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5

There is considerable overlap between these modalities; the physiological changes that occur are very similar, however, the effects differ slightly. From an anatomical point of view: Hypertrophy training is the only modality that stands out when it comes to an increase in the muscle cross sectional area. Training power (slightly) and strength (more so) ...


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My nutrition is standard low carb diet (about 40% protein / 60% fats, I eat cake/sweets max 2 times a week no more than 100g). Ding ding ding! We've found the culprit. Your body relies on carbohydrate for most of its energy. If you go low-carb, you're relying on transitioning from using carbs to ketosis, where you're using fats. Many people report ...


3

I boxed for four years and came out of one of the best gyms in the midwest. It was no frills and no excuses type of place in one of the worst areas of the US. But they were popping out guys for the Olympic team like candy. We also had a trainer that is recognized internationally. I will let his methods answer your question since you are more or less ...


3

To date there is no evidence that marathon participation is harmful for children. A Scandinavian researcher, Bengt Saltin, found in a 1995 study that active Kenyan school children covered on average 8–12K [~5-8 miles] a day. That's a weekly total of 35–50 miles. William Roberts, M.D., medical advisor for the Twin Cities Marathon, has conducted ...


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+1 zero carbs kills your energy and your mental capacity/health (your brain is the largest consumer of glucose). In the short term this is OK for gains like boot camp weight loss or training for an event, but it's no way to live well. Avoid the soda and candy, but make room in your life for "good carbs" (longer chain) like almonds, sweet potatoes, kidney ...


3

Hi DoubleDouble, There's this general myth (usually by people who spend countless hours at the gym) that one needs to visit a gym in order to exercise effectively. While going to the gym is a good idea, it's not a must. It works effectively for some people and not for others. Many people have gotten stronger without stepping into a gym. It seems that it ...


3

No, I don't think it's ok to continue running barefoot or minimalistic. The ankle pains are a clear indication you still need better footwear at this point. It could be that your calf muscles aren't strong enough, or even that you don't have the build to run without proper protection of conventional running shoes. My advice is to temporarily stop all ...


3

There is a concept known as "training stress". When you put stress on your system and then give your body time to recover, you will improve. When you started, it was easy for you to put stress on your system, but over time, your body adapted, and now you only put enough stress on your system to stay where you are. The solution is to change up what you are ...


2

Low carb is indeed a very good basis to start of from. Its however not directly suitable for doing high intensity workouts. Your body is perfectly capable of producing sugar from fat and protein and will happily store that in your liver and muscles to fuel short bursts of strength. Ones your stores are exausted however, your body won't be able to produce new ...


2

The big trouble with "hitting the wall" is that your body does physiologically react differently, and you need to train for that transition and working under the "post-wall" stress. The best way of doing this is "bonk training". Bonk is the runners term for the act of hitting the wall, and training and aiming to bonk means you are prepared when it happens ...


2

Ok, day-to-day strength. What you want, or rather, what you want to avoid, is the kind of exercise some people do to look strong, i.e. workout arms, abs and chest. There's nothing wrong with strong arms, but strong arms don't do much good without a good back. No matter what workout you do, even if it's rather light, I'd recommend not doing it two days in a ...


2

If you're squatting full depth 260lbs, I doubt it's a strength issue. I used to race competitively (road and mountain), and I can offer up a few places to get started. 5MPH is extremely slow. Like so slow that you can almost tip over because you're not carrying enough velocity to track in a straight line. At a good clip a hiker with a full pack can move at ...


2

You should have no problem doing that in 10 months. I don't agree that her physique is a heavy-lifter's physique. Women who lift heavy are generally much more curvy (bigger butt, trunk). I would say that she probably runs and does high intensity interval training (HIIT) type exercises -- and that's what I'd recommend. Take a 20-30 minute run every day ...


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Lots of programs are "scientifically based". That doesn't mean that looking for "scientifically based" programs is a good way to find a program that works well for you. Most quality, applicable strength and conditioning research is done with athletes, sports teams, and gyms--not generally in universities or by people who write their results up in a ...


2

For endurance and eventually speed increase, 25 minutes, six days a week would be better than 50 minutes 2-3x per week. The best advice I've ever seen for running is: Run. Run lots. Mostly slow, sometimes fast. One of the best programs I've seen for running comes from a triathlon and cross country coach that I've talked with a few times, and it's 3:2:1. Say ...


1

As the person who wrote that answer, I'd say that no one has any idea how long it will take. It depends on your specific level of fitness at those tasks now, which you haven't told us. In general, I'd say that most fit women should plan for a few months of training to reach the goals you stipulate. However: It's impossible to be more accurate than that ...


1

Warming up, sleep, stretching (do it after, not before!), hydration, and proper shoes/surface are more important and would be the main factors in her getting hurt or physically "stressed". At her age though, she shouldn't need to train for endurance. Better to practice actual skills like juggling a ball, passing/receiving with a wall or partner, or skills to ...


1

You're not going to be able to increase endurance with a 1.25 mile bike ride. HIIT/Tabata would have you pedal at 100% effort - an unsafe practice unless you are on an exercise bike or a closed track. Plus, as you already mentioned, you don't have shower facilities at work. Instead, why not think of it as an emotional "workout." Go slower. Ride relaxed, ...


1

Looking at that picture, you must not only lose fat, but build a fair amount of muscle as well. but a trainer told me women should do lower weight, more reps This is absolute nonsense. While cardio is certainly beneficial as well, you need to start lifting heavy if you want to look like her.


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If you're talking about entering ketosis via a ketogenic diet that's pretty interesting that you felt problems lasting for weeks. Most research I've seen, and my own experience, shows ketones consumption happening ~48 hours after carbohydrate restriction. I'm sure there's a huge variety in there, but 7 weeks seems excessively long. In this 2004 study that ...


1

Well, it's pretty simple. Pretty much any training that you do that improves your aerobic capacity will increase your fat-burning potential. Interval training is a traditional - and successful - way of doing this. If you increase your aerobic capacity, you can generate more power from fat and will therefore need to use less carbohydrate for a given power ...


1

Hitting the wall means that your liver is running out of glycogen. This doesn't mean that you are completely out of energy, because your body can still burn fat. But burning fat is a harder way to get energy. In order to improve your body's ability to deal with hitting the wall, you should go on some longer rides 1-2 times per week and cycle until you hit ...


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A study on Ironman triathletes found that supplementing sodium during a triathlon had no real effect on blood sodium. (source)


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Try doing sprints on a bicycle or aqua jogging. Both are less impact and should eliminate the pain while in the exercise. I would change out one of the runs for one of these exercises until you can consult a doctor and figure out what exactly is causing the pain. If the pain subsides then you might consider slowly adding more intensity or running (split the ...


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Well, without seeing your squat form, anyone giving any recommendations would not be correct. It seems like people think running is a great exercise; well it is not :) It can create problems, and many of us don't have any idea about running properly (not talking about you specifically) HIIT is not a must in order to lose fat, or exercise. You can do both ...


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I am in this sport too, I am a team captain of a german club, from Berlin. So eveyone is always thinking about what is the best way to train and get better. Since I am studying fitness, I began to ask what sort of training would be the best, I talked to some of my professors and to collegues. I've been reading and thinking about it a lot. My first ...



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