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I'm a long-distance cyclist and I lift now and then. I have a few thoughts... First, I suspect your cadence is far too low. If you are used to squatting you are used to pushing a ton of force into your legs. If you push a big (ie "high") gear, you are going to wear your legs out really quickly. You can get a cheap computer for your bike or you can just ...


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Ok, day-to-day strength. What you want, or rather, what you want to avoid, is the kind of exercise some people do to look strong, i.e. workout arms, abs and chest. There's nothing wrong with strong arms, but strong arms don't do much good without a good back. No matter what workout you do, even if it's rather light, I'd recommend not doing it two days in a ...


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If you're squatting full depth 260lbs, I doubt it's a strength issue. I used to race competitively (road and mountain), and I can offer up a few places to get started. 5MPH is extremely slow. Like so slow that you can almost tip over because you're not carrying enough velocity to track in a straight line. At a good clip a hiker with a full pack can move at ...


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It sounds like your legs have a hard time buffering the lactic acid build up you get from cycling. You might have a lower percentage of slow twitch muscle fibres in your legs than the average person, which could effect your endurance. What about carbohydrate intake ? If you are lacking sufficient glycogen content in your muscles it will definitely have an ...


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A study on Ironman triathletes found that supplementing sodium during a triathlon had no real effect on blood sodium. (source)


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Hitting the wall means that your liver is running out of glycogen. This doesn't mean that you are completely out of energy, because your body can still burn fat. But burning fat is a harder way to get energy. In order to improve your body's ability to deal with hitting the wall, you should go on some longer rides 1-2 times per week and cycle until you hit ...



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