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31

Firstly, do not eat a large meal just before sleep. This will trigger your digestion system and will affect your sleep. See this answer: Heavy meal at night effects on sleep and more Also, I'm surprised that you find exercising before bed beneficial. That contradicts everything I've ever heard. But compared to everything else you describe, changing this ...


16

One calorie (with a lower case c) is the amount of energy required to heat 1 gram of water by 1°C. A kilocalorie is 1000 calories, and Calorie (with a capital C) and kilocalorie are synonyms. On food labels, nutrition facts are in terms of kilocalories/Calories. (Wikipedia) Just like with grams vs. kilograms, units are used in a way that the number most ...


15

Energy metabolism is not a very well understood system in the sense that while the biochemical reactions are well known, their dynamics is highly variable depending on the individual. I find it disturbing that so many people have their own understanding of how their body work, without any sound reasoning behind it. Below I'll try to give some background ...


10

There are many factors that contribute lack of energy, but nutrition-wise, one of the reasons is "fast" carbohydrates (especially sugar). Carbonated soft drinks are usually the worst offenders. After you consume sugar, it immediately ends up in your blood, so your blood sugar level rises rapidly. Your body counters it by producing more insulin to maintain ...


7

In an effort to support the very thorough answer given by @Berin Loritsch, here is a more explicit conceptual picture. The mass food that is taken into the body (A) has 3 potential fates: 1) it will not be digested or absorbed by the digestive system (gut) and will pass out of the body via the anus. There are many factors that affect this but mainly it is ...


7

Try taking some melatonin before bed. Melatonin tends to be hit-or-miss in my experience, people I know who have tried it have had either great results or none at all. You can pick it up in any drug store, so it's worth a shot. You mentioned being tired during the day, does this happen even when you are getting enough sleep? You could have sleep apnea, a ...


7

If you really can't get away from screens, take a look at f.lux, which changes the brightness and colors of your screen according to the time of day where you are. It won't fix the problem of screen-time near bed-time, but I've found that it mitigates it. It can be switched off quickly and easily if you have color-sensitive work to do.


7

One way of looking at aerobic function is as the bodies ability to burn fat for fuel at a given pace or speed. Anaerobic function then is the bodies ability to burn sugar for fuel when we move beyond the pace at which we can burn primarily fat. Heart rate is often a good indicator of which mode we're in. Intervals and speed training, then, burn mostly sugar ...


7

Your question doesn't sound like you are overweight and need to watch your calories. In my opinion you could replace the brownie with some whole grain energy bar, replace the simple sugars with some more complex carbohydrates and maybe have some additional fibers, too. But the question is if you should. I think this is more a mental thing, the boost ...


6

Sounds like you have two goals. Fall asleep faster Fall asleep earlier First, I'd suggest you learn about your own sleep patterns. Lifehacker had a nice article on technology that can be helpful. By keeping closer track of the experiments you've done that are mentioned above you might notice things like, you need two days of consistency to make staying ...


6

I will do my best to address this question in a practical manner. Namely, I think the best way to burn fat and spare muscle while training is to construct a hypocaloric diet and workout plan with muscle preservation in mind. Steps I would take: Ensure diet is hypocaloric so that you actually lose weight over time. Continue weight training while dieting. ...


6

Should you switch to something less enjoyable but healthier? That depends on how much you enjoy it, and how integral to your habits this has become. If you find yourself "going to the gym so you can eat a brownie", then the brownie has probably become integral to your exercise as a reward for your workout habit. Exercising regularly is better for you than ...


6

It's a fallacy that fat people unleash bigger bolts of strength. Can fat people hurt you? Absolutely! Why? Because Force = mass X acceleration and fat people have a higher mass; with a decent speed, the force generated can hurt you. It's the same reason why a fat person will injure you if they sit on you; the force (weight = mass X gravity) the weight ...


5

To answer that question it would require a long discussion about the pancreas, the colon, the kidneys, the liver and general digestion. I believe the thyroid also has a role to play. The one organ that is most involved with regulating the fat stores is the pancreas. When your body has a surplus of blood sugar, it secretes insulin which stores the excess ...


5

Here's a related question: How to get rid of oversleeping? Although your situation sounds worse. If you're taking a nap during the day you should stop. Are you exercising at all? If not, try going for a run after work or lifting weights at the local gym. Exercising will help you in many ways: it will make you physically tired, it will get your mind off of ...


5

These have often been helpful to me in this area: Exercise Proper vitamins such as B and Magnesium Reduce or eliminate alcohol intake as this can act as an inhibitor Proper eating (smaller meals more frequently) Include short bursts of intense activity with lower intensity activity in your workouts several times a week Ensure you are not depriving your ...


5

A goal weight is a terrible goal. If you were 58kg were mostly fat with very little muscle mass, would you be any happier that you are now? Additionally, during your last month you might have lost two pounds of fat, but gained two pounds of muscle, making you stronger, an potentially leaner without you realising. Does this make the last month a waste? You ...


4

Maybe your calorie reduction is too drastic to support increased activity. Try figuring out how many calories you are consuming, and comparing that number to the calories you need to maintain your weight (you can find tools online to help with this). To lose a pound a week, you would need a deficit of 500 calories a day. If your calorie deficit is too large, ...


4

Actually, Sustained Energy and Perpetuem from Hammer Nutrition can be concentrated into a paste. With this, you don't really need to drink a ton of water. But, if you are running for a few hours, you'll definitely want to consume 20-24 oz of water in addition to your fuel. Another great company is Infinit Nutrition. They have some very good products ...


4

Sleeping the same amount every night is important, but it's just as important to go to sleep at the same time and wake up at the same time every night. For example, if you sleep 10pm-5am one night, then midnight-7am the next, and 3-10am on weekends, you'll probably still feel tired even though you're getting about 7 hours of sleep every night. Our bodies ...


4

Here is one more possibility to throw out there: you may be dealing with sleep apnea. Sleep apnea doesn't have anything to do with your physical activity or your diet. Both my friend and I deal with the ailment, and long before I started getting active he has always been active and healthy. Yet we both deal with it. What is sleep apnea? Sleep apnea ...


4

Your premise is a bit off. Protein and Carbohydrates have essentially the same number of Calories. It's fat that has more calories. Protein: 4 Cal/g Carbohydrates: 4 Cal/g Fat: 9 Cal/g In order to understand how Atkins and other ketogenic diets work, you need to understand a bit about energy systems and a very important pair of hormones. ...


3

You should be to try and get your circadian rythm back on track. This is not a quick fix, it requires patience and effort, but should be your best bet. The first order of business is basic sleep hygiene. Try to go to sleep at the same time every day. Avoid anything that interferes with your sleep, such as caffeine late in the day eating close to bed, or ...


3

It is still confusing, because both terms (with and without the kilo- prefix) covers the same amount, and it is only a capital letter that differentiates beween 1 and 1000. This would be equal to having Gram (with a capital letter) and kilogram being the same, and gram being 1/1000 of that. I hopy everyone can see how stupid that would be, and this is ...


3

I doubt that one granny smith apple will affect your energy, although it might make you feel better, which might in turn improve performance. I don't think that it will be significant in terms of the bad effects associated with overconsumption of sugar. There are a number of implied sub-questions in your post so the answer is complicated: Will eating an ...


3

It means the equation isn't perfect, but just an estimation. You happen to have found one case where it fails quite a bit. Of course, it doesn't help that you didn't describe an actual human being (the shortest verified person is 54.6cm, that is 21.5 inches). I don't feel like doing the path, but I'm sure the formula provide reasonable estimations for ...


3

If you take a look at A Biometric Study of Human Basal Metabolism, where Harris and Benedict introduced their formula, you will see one important sentence: These equations have been tabulated for values of weight from 25.0 to 124.9kgm. [sic], for stature from 151cm to 200cm., and for age from 21 to 70 years, so that the most probable basal metabolism of ...


3

It goes without saying (?) that these rep ranges are to some kind of failure. The idea is that failure occurs because some system is depleted/damaged and with rest it will be repaired and eventually strengthened. 1-3 reps is thought to stress out your neurotransmitters so you fail and the body's response is improved nerves and muscle recruitment that ...


3

Technically speaking, the energy used by the muscles is not glycogen, but the phosphate bonds in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). When energy is needed, one of the phosphate bonds is broken, resulting in an energy release and the creation of the subsequent adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and waste materials. This is one of the main reasons that creatine phosphate ...


3

They are both correct, however, the way they are stated is the source of confusion. 1) There is no correlation between the number of fibers and the energy system used. There is actually an exogenous explanation. The increased recruitment of muscle fibers occurs due to an increase in tension of the muscle. I.e. the force production is increased. When you are ...



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