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15

Using an exercise ball as a desk chair is not a magic bullet. It will not work for all people and may actually hurt some. There is no replacement for strength training if you want a stronger core (including back muscles). Some articles I've read (I couldn't find a source other than the article themselves) suggest that you may be compressing your spine and ...


8

According to this paper, about 4.1 kcal per hour above what you would have burned sitting in an office chair. .... Sitting on a therapy ball or standing may be a passive means of increasing energy expenditure throughout the workday. The purpose of this study was to determine the energy expenditure and liking of performing clerical work in ...


6

Depends - If you tend to sit for prolonged periods without moving, sitting on an exercise ball (for part of the time) can help by giving you a more dynamic posture as your trunk muscles make frequent adjustments. I think of the effect as improving muscle control, so in that respect you could say it is strengthening your core and postural muscles. For me, ...


5

This depends on a couple of factors such as how tall your desk is and at what hight will you be able to have proper wrist position. When I purchased an exercise ball for this purpose, I would go to the store and get the biggest one they had (I'm 6'3"). This usually ended up being 30 inches (75cm) in diameter. I would suggest you do the same thing and get the ...


5

AskMen.com has a nice beginners' exercise ball routine including: Trunk Extensions for your lower back. Core Crunchers for your abs and core. Basic Crunches for your abs. Elevated Pushups for your pecs, shoulders, triceps, and abs. Bent Knee Bridges for your gluts and hamstrings. Abdominal Rolls for your abs. Opposite Limb Extension for your lower back, ...


4

I was looking for a general guideline as I am to purchase an exercise-ball online. According to this article: Knees should be level or slightly lower than the pelvis - creating an angle of 90 degrees or slightly greater at the hips and knees (thighs parallel to ground or pointing down slightly). They also give a general guideline on choosing the ball ...


4

There is some evidence that using an exercise ball as an office chair may do more harm than good (source: PubMed). This study found that there was a higher level of activation in the low back muscles on an exercise ball than on an office chair. This doesn't sound like such a bad thing, but according to the authors: It seems ... that low-level activations ...


3

I did some small, very unscientific testing myself. I sat on a chair and ball for 2x30 minutes and averaged the heart rate and kcal/5 min. The bump at the beginning was caused by me drinking coffee. As you can see the heart rates are very similar and the difference in kcal is pretty negligible too. On average I burn about 1-1.1 kcal / minute, which is ...


3

Based on Barbie's excellent answer, I suspect we should view the exercise ball exactly for what it is: a ball to exercise on. It might help you train to get a better posture, which is useful for when you sit in a regular chair, but it isn't meant as an alternative for your permanent seating. In your specific case: pain while sitting is never a good sign, ...


2

The Bosu can be used on both sides - standing on the rounded blue side or the flat black side. Both sides provide an "unstable" surface that makes your ankle muscles adjust to control your movements and stability of the ankle. Progressing from Sitting to Unsupported Standing This video shows a progression of ankle exercises beginning in sitting, ...


1

Sorry if this answer is way too late to help you at all but extra exercise in this form is certainly not going to hurt your goals. Having an exercise ball is definitely going to complement your physique with loads of exercises to do such as planks/crunches etc. I would recommend still hitting abs though as its going to get important as you progress more with ...


1

You can do trunk extensions flat on the floor. Or if you prefer you can use pretty much anything to lift you up a little eg a folded blanket or cushions. http://www.brianmac.co.uk/exercise.htm


1

You might want to pay attention to the texture of the ball. Some exercise balls have latitudinal ridges that help the ball grip onto surfaces. These may make a ball more comfortable to sit on since the ridges can prevent the ball from sliding around too much on wood or tile floors. This however might also make the ball less comfortable if you can actually ...


1

The main reason for using a bosu ball is to increase the number of muscles and muscle fibers recruited for the activity, and to increase the proprioception. I had to use the Bosu quite extensively for my Achilles rupture rehab, and here's a few the exercises that I was doing (My PT guys were creative sadists, but they were good.): Chop squats - Put the ...


1

Here's another link with some exercise ball workout videos. I think exercise/swiss balls are a great addition to any program, but don't get into the 'new toy' syndrome and focus on just using that, you'll become bored, your body will get used to the routine(s) and the rest of your body will be neglected. Determine what your goal is and use whatever tools ...



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