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8

I've often felt there were two aspects to using a weight belt. The first being the psychological sense of security that the belt provides. Belts make us feel “locked in” and ready to lift thus providing a positive framework to perform the lift. The second and more important aspect is the potential support that a belt provides thus reducing the ...


5

In short - belt gives better stabilization. Why not to use it? Well, you wish to have great stabilization... You would like to use that muscles, not to support them. Is it cheating - since that is legal - it is not cheating. Same as wrist/knee stabilization, special pants. All that helps you lift higher values - if that is your target? On the other hand ...


4

The safety bars should be set a few inches below the lowest the bar could conceivably go during a successful squat. This way, if the squat goes wrong in any way, you just lower yourself to the bottom of your squat. Do this fast if necessary; release tension in the core, if necessary; jump forward (if the bar is on your back) or backward (if the bar is in ...


3

My personal philosophy for using straps is to use them when I don't want my grip strength to limit the effect an exercise will have on a muscle group I'm trying to work. If I'm doing Romanian deadlifts, barbell shrugs, barbell rows after deadlifts (conversely, I don't use them on Pendlay rows since I reset the bar between reps), or Kroc rows, I'm more likely ...


3

I'd go with the larger one. Looks like it won't be as sore sitting on your shoulders. The small one also looks like it will only take small plates. This will really limit how much weight you can put on. You should ask them can they get olympic barbells in as these are what people normally use.


3

Rowers that are used in gym and club settings typically suffer from two problems. Insufficient maintenance by the club and incorrect form by those using the equipment. The average gym member does not know how to use a rower correctly. Their poor technique typically results in the foot straps loosening because of the urge to “lift” the toes on the finish ...


3

As AlexL suggests, since you are in a power rack, you can simply set the safeties to a couple inches below squat depth. Then if you need to bail, simply lower your squat beyond your usual squatting depth, rest the bar the safeties, and wiggle your way out. Similarly for the bench press. You should be able to set the safeties in such a way that when your ...


3

Great question! Especially coming before actually having had bail out (that's the terminology) of a squat. I'm guessing you're back squatting. When failing to stand up during a rep you'll at least have some power left to slow the weight down on the way back down. Use this opportunity and don't hesitate. Release your hands, sit up so the moves backwards, ...


2

I'm in the no-strap no-glove camp. I trained for a while in powerlifting, and if you lift raw you can't use straps. So I'm of the mindset that a deadlift is how much you can lift, and that includes how much you can hold onto. To that end, once I get up north of my 5RM I'll use a mixed grip. I think if you need help holding onto the bar at 5RM or lower then ...


2

I'd find a new gym. But if this is your only option there's pros and cons to both. Without knowing the length I'm not sure which I'd use. The longer one I would fear would snap in half under tension, but if you're just starting out this might not be a valid concern. I would be cautious putting 300+ lbs on that though... I might be cautious putting 100 lbs ...


2

You can do a lot of core exercises on these. Examples: Pullups/chinups on the high bar. On the two low parallel bars, you can do different variants of dips. Usually, there'll be a very low bar to lock on your feet - so you can do situps. And the ground layer is soft and nice(but firm), making it really good for pushups(rather than on concrete). Nothing too ...


2

As others have mentioned it increases IAP. An effect of it is that it may also allow your core muscles to fire harder by giving your CNS a reason to reduce limits on certain muscles. It probably isn't cheating I disagree with the apparently common belief that wearing a belt will reduce the opportunity for the lower back to get stronger. Numerous studies ...


2

I'd suggest foregoing the machine altogether and focusing on these two things: Try and find some kind of fun, 30 minute or so, workout plan that includes a mix of resistance training and cardio. Do this ~5 days a week. Reign in your diet. A lot of these workout plans come with meal plans and suggestions. Small changes can go a long way. If you keep ...


1

Or am I just retarded and the pronged belts don't give as much support as the lever belt? Opinions seem divided on whether a lever and prong can be made just as tight. Some say the lever can be put on tighter, but apparently using a rack as an anchor point when putting on the prong belt can get it just as tight as with a lever. I still have at least ...


1

Previous answers all missed a crucial aspect... the belt works by allowing you brace your abdominals against it. It doesn't "support" the back. It allows YOU to better support your midline/trunk/core/fad-name-for-that-area more effectively. Generally, you should do as much work as you can without the belt (get used to generating that intra-abdominal force ...


1

Due to the small market for the disabled, you really need to be creative. In some cases the disabled person will have equipment special made for them, and in others they will make do with something off the shelf. In the video, it looks like the person in question used an off the shelf strap that was tied in a way to anchor the bar. I've seen injured ...


1

In my humble opinion (I'm not a physician nor a personal trainer)if you want to lose weight the better option is (as other have pointed out)changing your diet (that could just be reducing the daily calories. But since you asked for a machine I'll suggest a rower. Why a rower and not an exercise bike or treadmill ? Because it's equally (if not more) ...


1

Exercise bike is great as it's not that hard on the body like a treadmill is. You can perform hiit or steady state cardio on it. Bare in mind weight loss is achieved through calorie deficit and exercise is just a means of assisting in creating a deficit. If you eat more than you burn it won't make a difference what exercise you do, you won't lose weight


1

From the website you linked to: The surface of the push up bars are inclined at a slight angle to provide comfort to your wrist when performing push ups. Traditional push up bars have a flat surface which forces users to twist their wrist & lean their body forward. In Addition, the inclined surface of the new model helps you work your entire chest ...



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