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3

My personal philosophy for using straps is to use them when I don't want my grip strength to limit the effect an exercise will have on a muscle group I'm trying to work. If I'm doing Romanian deadlifts, barbell shrugs, barbell rows after deadlifts (conversely, I don't use them on Pendlay rows since I reset the bar between reps), or Kroc rows, I'm more likely ...


3

Rowers that are used in gym and club settings typically suffer from two problems. Insufficient maintenance by the club and incorrect form by those using the equipment. The average gym member does not know how to use a rower correctly. Their poor technique typically results in the foot straps loosening because of the urge to “lift” the toes on the finish ...


3

I'd go with the larger one. Looks like it won't be as sore sitting on your shoulders. The small one also looks like it will only take small plates. This will really limit how much weight you can put on. You should ask them can they get olympic barbells in as these are what people normally use.


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This is a complete myth: there is absolute no evidence to suggest that weightlifting may stunt your growth. The reason that this myth came about was that by exercising, your body requires more calories and nutrients to make up for the increased rate of exertion therefore if you don't consume enough then your growth may be impacted.


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I'm in the no-strap no-glove camp. I trained for a while in powerlifting, and if you lift raw you can't use straps. So I'm of the mindset that a deadlift is how much you can lift, and that includes how much you can hold onto. To that end, once I get up north of my 5RM I'll use a mixed grip. I think if you need help holding onto the bar at 5RM or lower then ...


2

I'd find a new gym. But if this is your only option there's pros and cons to both. Without knowing the length I'm not sure which I'd use. The longer one I would fear would snap in half under tension, but if you're just starting out this might not be a valid concern. I would be cautious putting 300+ lbs on that though... I might be cautious putting 100 lbs ...


1

Due to the small market for the disabled, you really need to be creative. In some cases the disabled person will have equipment special made for them, and in others they will make do with something off the shelf. In the video, it looks like the person in question used an off the shelf strap that was tied in a way to anchor the bar. I've seen injured ...


1

If you look up the term "suspension bands" on youtube you will get a variety of exercises that you may be able to adapt to your jump rope. The exercises target your trunk or core muscles, upper and lower body giving you a very good functional workout. TRX is a popular band and this video shows a variety of exercises with the strap using your body weight as ...


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They use various accelerometers and detect motion on numerous algorithms to count at activity. It won't be 100% accurate but it's not "sorry, you didn't swing your arm buddy... NO REP" either.


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Try it out? Go for a walk without swinging your arms and see if it counts a reasonable number of steps. Technically speaking, the accelerometer will definitely be able to record your steps even if you don't swing your arms.


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Not aware of any other retro fitters, but technically a bespoke system would be a trivial exercise; wondering if you've considered an alternative that may be cheaper, be less hassle to run, especially if you have no desire to capture the results from any trip computers your equipment currently carries, or a desire to issue RFID keys to your clients, and ...


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From the website you linked to: The surface of the push up bars are inclined at a slight angle to provide comfort to your wrist when performing push ups. Traditional push up bars have a flat surface which forces users to twist their wrist & lean their body forward. In Addition, the inclined surface of the new model helps you work your entire chest ...


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Inclined bars allow you to shift your center of gravity, by altering the angle of your body to the floor. A steeper angle moves your center of gravity towards your feet, essentially shifting the effort required to do a pushup in that direction, so there's less strain on the upper body. Move down the bars and you increase the upper body effort required to do ...



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