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12

Common warning signs of overtraining include: Washed-out feeling, tired, drained, lack of energy Mild leg soreness, general aches and pains Pain in muscles and joints Sudden drop in performance Insomnia Headaches Decreased immunity (increased number of colds, and sore throats) Decrease in training capacity / intensity Moodiness and irritability Depression ...


11

Let's start at this point: Some exercise > no exercise In short, if you are doing something, anything, you will make positive steps toward fitness. The problem with stopping there, is that usually the something people choose, doesn't maintain their interest. This can be a result of not perceiving any benefit, or shear boredom. Your goals are stated ...


9

If it helps, I do about 1 hour 3x per week. You might be able to get away with 1 hour 2x per week and still make some gains--albeit a bit more slowly. The key to being efficient with your time is to perform exercises that recruit as many muscles at the same time time as possible. That also means no machines. We're talking free weights here. A beginner's ...


8

What it sounds like you are asking is how can you improve cardiovascular health most efficiently with the use of activity. First off, heart health is mainly achieved through dietary adjustments but regular activity plays a vital role as well. Any activity can improve the health of your heart provided you are reaching the right intensity. Indicators we use ...


7

There are both physiological and neurological reasons to build in rest. Even elite athletes who take on volumes of training most of us would not be able to comprehend have smart periods of lighter training and even full rest periods. Physiologically training works by stressing the body just enough that the adaptation allows you to recover and the body ...


7

The good news is that there is more than one way to achieve your goals. That means that you can have two answers that vary within a certain degree and they will both be right. In short, there is no "best". The related question that @Informaficker linked to in his comment applies to this conversation. It's also important to understand that many successful ...


6

IF the sessions you mention are done every day, then the answer probably is, that you have too little rest. Muscle needs rest to be able to recuperate and grow. Usually muscle won't grow properly if you do the same muscle group exercises 2 days in a row, but twice a day could actually diminish your muscle mass more than they grow. Therefore, You should try ...


6

You're right, you should still get results, albeit slower. However, you might consider lifting twice and running three times a week rather than the other way around. Given enough intensity (and proper rest), it is easy enough to see progress with lifting on just two sessions a week. Or you might switch between blocks with focus on lifting (3xlift 2xrun) ...


6

The Short Answer About Your Friend's Advice A movement being functional (whatever that means) does not disqualify it from causing an overuse injury or overtraining. Either your friend is wrong or we are not understanding your friend's argument. What is a Functional Movement Anyway? Classifying a movement as "functional" is a fuzzy endeavor. He might be ...


5

I've been climbing, training for climbing, and reading books on the subject for a long time. If you are new to climbing, you need as much volume at the easiest grades possible. This is the best way to condition all of your body, as well as improve your technique. Go to the gym, do all of the easiest problems. Repeat them over and over. This will make ...


5

From Training Dimensions: Greasing the Groove is a technique used to practice any strength movement at a high volume without requiring a long period of recovery. If you are new to pullups, greasing the groove allows you to practice pullups often, teaching your central nervous system to perform the movement more efficiently. In greasing the groove, you ...


5

To answer your question about overtraining and injury separately: Overtraining is putting your body through greater stress than it is equipped to handle. If you were talking about adding external weights to your pushups and chin-ups then you might hit that threshold. You can do pushups daily and not put your body through enough stress to overtrain it. ...


5

No. To my knowledge, there is no conclusive amount of exercise for children that is all-encompassing. Realistically, just look at your kids. If they're fat, they need more exercise and less food, providing that there are no other health issues at hand. If they're too skinny (read "too skinny" as "malnourished"), they need more food, once again taking into ...


5

According to the ACE Personal Training Manual (American Council on Exercise (2003). ACE Personal Trainer Manual (3rd ed.). San Diego, CA: American Council on Exercise.): Because the muscle rebuilding process typically requires about 48 hours, strength workouts should be scheduled on an every-other-day basis. Clients who prefer to train more ...


5

Yes, you will see improvements, but they will be slow. The residual training effect table on exrx.net (found here, screenshot below) describes how the body retains changes in body state and motor control after ceasing to exercise for a certain time period: The table shows a 15 day (+/- 5 day) retention period on strength endurance. This is defined as: ...


4

If you're doing a full body workout 6 days a week, you absolutely need the rest week. If you are working different muscle sets each day then it's less important. The body does need time to catch up to the new muscle that you are building. The body's internal organs have to gain strength to handle working those muscles, and without the rest, your body can ...


4

As long as your progress is still good, you should be fine. When it starts to slow, stop, or reverse then you want to consider the possibility that it's because of overtraining. Another thing to look for is pain that doesn't seem "quite right". It sounds like you've been working out enough to know the difference between normal muscle soreness and something ...


4

According to Body By Science, you can develop strength and cellular aerobic exercise with a 15-20 minute workout every 7-10 days. In fact, this book argues that more frequent exercise may even be counterproductive. Mind you, these brief infrequent workouts are quite intense and are design to simultaneously exhaust all four muscle fibers and drain their ...


4

There are two answers to your question. Improving forearm strength is usually done through a combination of exercises. Grippers are good and generally you squeeze, hold for a second, and then slowly release. Repeat until you're too sore to continue. Do it again the next day. If your hotel rooms have door molding, you can practice finger tip hangs from ...


3

I think the CDC has a concise answer for you in their physical activity recommendations for health benefits. They break it down into moderate intensity exercise (150 minutes per week) or vigorous intensity (75 minutes per week) or a combination of the two. As you improve, increase to 300 minutes of moderate intensity exercise or 150 minutes of vigorous ...


3

I think you could do a running program consisting of 2 runs a weeks and still achieve "good results". One run should focus on a shorter and faster effort after a nice brisk warm up walk. And the other run should focus on a longer and slower effort after a nice brisk warm up. The shorter run should be closer to your 5K pace goal. The longer effort could ...


3

I would have to agree with RMX that high-intensity weight training can cause mental sluggishness. For me, over-training might mean edgy mood and thoughts racing through my head. This sometimes causes reduced appetite and inability to fall asleep. There are general signs of mental stress. I see these signs in athletes of competitive sports, such as ...


3

I don't think there's anything wrong with doing mini workouts throughout the day, especially if you wouldn't do them otherwise. Unless you're specifically trying to improve your pushups and chinups, you may want to include some other simple body weight exercises as well. Some I could think of off the top of my head: Squats Planks Sit-ups Lunges


3

I highly recommend reading "Practical Programming for Strength Training" by Dr. Kilgore and Mark Rippetoe. The first few chapters will help you better understand what happens in your body as you exercise. The part that applies to this answer is that the 48-72 hours of rest applies to beginners and novices, not to intermediate or higher athletes. A program ...


3

You're going to experience novice gains almost no matter what you do, so expect that the first six weeks or so will be great. If the CrossFit gym is properly run, you'll get stronger and better at not getting tired. CrossFit varies greatly from gym to gym ("box" to "box"), but the basic formula is generally constant: basic gymnastics, power- and Olympic ...


3

No. This way of exercise is very common for top-athletes. By isolating muscle groups you can, as you describe, theoretically train and work on your muscle building continuously. It is very effective. It is though a tough way of exersicing, and it requires a lot of self discipline, planing and routine. It is very difficult to totally isolate specific muscle ...


3

Personally I wouldn't use a workout like that at all. The problem is that the areas you are working on each day are not complementary. You're also over-working your arms and under-working your legs. A common exercise failing. Think about it like this. Each of your major muscle groups has a complementary group. Your chest has your back, biceps have triceps, ...


3

The biggest thing you have is a back to back session of Wednesday/Thursday. My knowledge of Crossfit is that the focus is on General Physical Preparedness (GPP), so the whole body is being hit every time. I would expect Thursday to be the day you struggle the most due to residual fatigue from Wednesday's session, but if that's not the case then the culprit ...


2

It sounds like you are focusing too much on exercises in the gym and too little on your diet. I have been weight training and exercising for about 10 years now and nutrition is the absolute most important part. I suggest that you read The Abs Diet. It really has helped me over the years to understand what causes fat and what types of food you need to gain ...


2

Chad gave a lot of good advice - the best way to build more climbing endurance is to climb more, even if you have to do laps on the easier routes. But you might also want to suppliment your climbing with some basic training for pullups and your abs. Technique is necessary, but "correct technique" sometimes depends on a certain threshold level of ...



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