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The short answer is no. The long answer is maybe. The basic "model" of the body's energy supply is that it holds a certain amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood if the number gets too high, it binds the blood sugar with insulin and stores it in fat cells. If the number gets too low, the body uses glucagon to un-bind the sugar and return it to usability in ...


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I've had this before and although I'm a little cautious to throw the overtraining flag, research suggests there is correlation if not causation: These individuals became acutely overtrained as indicated by significant reductions in running performance from day 1 to day 11. The overtrained state was accompanied by severe fatigue, immune system ...


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I can only speak from experience as someone else that usually works out a few hours before going to sleep. I often have the same problem, particularly after cardio due to the elevated heartrate, but sometimes after weightlifting too. The best thing you can do for yourself is to establish a night-routine that will help relax your body between a workout and ...


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I had a lot of success doing bodyweight training for the couple of years that I was more-or-less forced to, living in a developing nation with no real gym options. If you go the bodyweight route, I'd recommend these strategies: Realize that "some pushups and pullups" isn't going to cut it. Just like most people in a gym have no idea what they're doing, ...


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Knuckle pushups, bodyweight squats, and sit-ups, as a program, would mostly increase muscular endurance and cardio. A 3x5 program like Rippetoe's Starting Strength would actually increase your strength and power. Muscular endurance is great for fighting, but A) you're probably already doing those exercises in class and B) if you're stronger you have better ...


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J.T. Hurley's comments about having protein available for muscle growth to occur can absolutely NOT be overstated. If you're intentions for working out are to gain muscle mass and increase your overall strength, you would be doing yourself a tremendous disservice by not having plenty of protein, calories, and water readily available before, during, and after ...


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Before you do anything, you should ask your doctor if there's anything you should avoid doing or anything you should specifically do. I'm not sure if there's anyone here with the training to speak to this specific circumstance. As a general rule, it's usually not a bad idea to start with walking, stretching, and manipulating extremely light weights. The ...


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It's doubtful your heart rate was in sync; you can't really state that without monitoring. You can measure your stride: it's usually around 160 (strides per minute), with a lot of conventional running gurus touting 180 as better for a variety of reasons. Your breathing and stride can be matched up and this whole thing is known as locomotor-respiratory ...


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It's a combination of things, actually. Anger causes the amygdala in the brain to go a little crazy, and it triggers the response of dumping adrenaline and noradrenaline into the body. This is similar to what happens when the "fight or flight" response is triggered. During this time, you are generally capable of greater physical feats than normal, driven ...


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In addition to the above information, I would recommend resistance bands. You can get those for a good price and they increase the variations you can do with body weight exercises. As a bonus, they are light enough that you can take 1 or 2 of them if you travel.



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