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10

Being able to touch the toes depends mainly on two things: hamstring flexibility body proportions (relative length of legs, torso, and arms) It is not possible to change body proportions, so, to reach the toes, someone with longer legs and shorter torso/arms will need to have more flexibility in the hamstrings. It is possible for anyone to reach that ...


6

I am rather convinced that there is nothing productive to do relating to fitness while actually driving. For the duration they're going to be sitting in a bad position, they're going to be slightly asymmetrical with their limb usage, they're going to be sedentary. The Inescapable Tragedy of Sitting Here's the thing, as Joseph Stromburg summarizes for Vox: ...


4

Is there a weighted shirt or similar which one could use for everyday wear? ... Is there a more discrete option for this kind of training? The most popular and simultaneously most discrete option for this kind of training is using ankle weights. These can be hidden, or at least mostly obscured under pant legs. And naturally people should be more ...


4

If the concern is keeping up their fitness while in the car, thats not possible nor is it wise. While driving, focus on driving, not fitness. However, if you look at this part of your question: What can they do to burn more calories and stay healthy while behind the wheel? If they (or you on their behalf) are interested in their calorie deficit, ...


3

It's possible, but I wouldn't call it "likely" in the sense that "this is the most probably reason". The most likely reason is simply lack of flexibility. If one, over a longer period of time, works on their flexibility, most people (barring certain "disabilities") will be able to reach their toes, or even palm the floor.


2

Depends a lot on how long you've been training, and what level of technique you have right now. Assuming you can make some technical gains as well as strength wise gains, and assuming you're quite new to lifting I'd say you can increase by about 15-25% in 3 months, i.e. bench 60-65 kg etc. I would suggest including leg exercises and avoiding the isolation ...


1

Broadly speaking, two things: one, there may be a difference in total volume (60 reps at that weight versus 61 reps at that weight; in this case it's negligible but in other cases it can be substantial), two, you get the benefits and drawbacks of going to failure when you go to failure and not when you don't. Going to failure--that is, doing reps until you ...


1

Focus on the ~14 waking hours per day. As outlined in Dave's answer, sitting for long periods is bad, no way around it. Where I work, I have a stand up desk with a high chair. If I want to stand up, I hop off the chair. If I want to sit, I sit my butt down. A few times a day I work on my third-world-squat. Stand up in meetings. Have walking meetings. If ...


1

For your case, go easy on the complex carbs and sugars with your lunch. On your commute, have a pre-workout bar/snack about an hour away from the gym. Have a cup of coffee (or similar caffeine intake) about 15min from workout start. After heavy lifting, have a nice post-workout meal.


1

How you should react totally depends on what your specific medical diagnosis is, which we can't speak to. However in a (perhaps?) similar situation, what worked was a drastic temporary reduction in shoulder lifting volume and a less-drastic reduction in overall training volume. This gave my shoulder time to de-inflame so I could gradually work back up. ...



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