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I have read this article on the topic and I think is a very good read and very informative piece of advice http://hypertensionnaturalremedies.com/is-it-safe-to-exercise-with-high-blood-pressure/


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According to Dr Stuart McGill, twisting your spine is generally safe without a load, not safe with a load (discussed around 20:00 here). However, things may be different for people with bad backs: For example, flexion-intolerant backs are very common. Stretches such as pulling the knees to the chest may give the perception of relief (via stimulation of ...


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"Listen" to your body. If you feel pain during exercise (not one of lactic buildup in muscles), with or without injuries, it's best to immediately stop. Make sure you are doing the exercise properly and that you don't have an underlying condition that limits your ability to perform the exercise safely. That being said, I'm occasionally doing twists, ...


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The simple rule is this: Replenish the fluid you lose. It's worrying to see gymmers sipping on electral or glucose water when your body doesn't need the electrolytes or calories they contain. Drinking glucose water sends your blood glucose levels into a tizzy, pushing you towards a mild addiction to sugar. You need it only if you play an outdoor sport like ...


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Another 500-1000kcal coming from natural unprocessed food is unlikely to have negative side effects. I would be more concerned with the amount of calories you are about to start introducing to your diet. If you don't reduce anything else (which you probably will, subconsciously), 500-1000kcal is quite a huge increase. Start with 50-100gr and further increase ...


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Let's take a look at the three nuts mentioned (peanuts, cashews, almonds) on Nutritiondata to see what looks interesting. Peanuts. 100 grams amounts to 567 Kcal. 49 grams fat, of which only 7 grams saturated. 16 grams carbohydrates of which 8 grams fiber and 4 grams sugar. A nice 26 grams protein. Peanuts have an outstanding amino acid profile making them ...


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You don't "start over" unless you stop lifting for several months. The point is to always be stronger for the rest of your life. The point is not to lift the weight and then pretend you can't lift the heavy weight. If you miss a rep on one exercise, it doesn't affect the others. They track separately. If you miss one rep of, say, a squat, then try that ...


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For starters, it might be useful to distinguish "push/pull" and "push/pull/legs". In PPL, the legs get a separate day. Let's assume PPL for the rest of this post. The way I see it, but I could be wrong, is that for the intermediate or advanced lifter (it isn't that great for a novice) PPL is simply very convenient. A novice would want to do 3 full-body ...


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The reason you shake, especially if your a beginner is because of autogenic inhibition. For example on bench press, your arms will shake because as the tricep (agonist) is contracting the bicep(antagonist) is being stretched, therefore your muscles spindles are detecting this strength and sending signals to contract to protect the bicep from over stretching. ...


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It sounds like the pain in your hip is coming from your hip-flexors. This group is comprised of the: Illiopsoas; Sartorius; and Rectus Femorus. Their purpose is to: Flex your hip joint; Flex your trunk forward; Pull your thigh upward; and to help stabilize your lower body (at the pelvis). This picture doesn't do a great job of showing the weight ...


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A little while ago I was playing Dance Dance Revolution and finally managed to make it through the most intense song I'm currently capable of without dying. That is, running out of health meter in the game. But I also didn't die physically. I wear a heart monitor while playing and at the end it showed 203 BPM. My age at that moment (it's about a month ago) ...


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The premise for this notion is based upon glycogen depletion. Replenishing glycogen allows the body to recover better and start working on muscle repair, however, You would need to work out for a few hours to consider that your glycogen might have been depleted. Assuming your friend is an athlete like you claim he probably trains for hours at a time and ...


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What your friend is referring to is commonly called the "Golden hour" or the "Golden Window". It is also dependent on the type of exercise that you are doing. Many studies have shown that for endurance exercisers that have a need to replace glycogen in both muscles and body storage, that sooner is better, as the body is primed to deliver glycogen to the ...


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To answer which one burns more calories, that's pretty straightforward math. Steady state cardio burns calories based upon intensity level x amount of calories per minute . In order to get that number you would need to know your heart rate during exercise and either have the hr monitor calculate the calories burnt totals for you or plug it in to a online ...



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