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1

Seems like everyone has giving you some good advice. However, I agree with JohnP the most because your health should be the most important aspect of your life. Find something you like, get up and take breaks frequently to drink some water throughout the day is cheap and possibly would give you the most health benefits while you are at work. Since you are ...


0

Your heart is a muscle running 24*7 and putting it in the red zone day in day out may not be the best decision. The ideal approach will be to make the heart habitual of controlled stress (Most athletes follow this approach) and let it go back to its green easy zone aka rest period. Doing cardio 4 times works for many as they get the motivation and the ...


0

I second on Tabata protocol , note however , that the (very good) endurance increase is subject to 2 issues: 1) you should be pretty fit to doing tabata 2) the gains will stall after 3 weeks (or something like that), so you could expect 6 to 12 good training sessions , that will do you good. after that you will gain nothing.


1

If all you have is 5 minutes and your goal is physical endurance, High Intensity Interval Training exercises are strongly recommended. Cardio exercises are very good for the heart and when performed with high intensity periodically, they build physical endurance. Also, by nature of HIIT, they are supposed to be performed in a relatively short period. ...


1

The good news is that, while sitting will kill you, the research seems to show that as little as a two minute walk each hour largely reverses the effect. Either set yourself an alarm or get up and get coffee or water on the hour. Add the recommended 20 minutes of moderate exercise three times a week and you should be fine.


4

What not to do First off, if you're doing situps on the floor, stop it immediately. Floor situps are harmful for your back, and provide little to no effect in terms of abdominal muscle growth. While pushups are more beneficial, I have to start by saying that 5 minutes isn't enough time to do any work from which to enjoy physical benefits. It might serve as ...


0

The simple answer is that it is safe. Whether it is effective depends upon your goals. If you are starting from an untrained condition, then it pretty much doesn't matter what you do, and working out every day will work fine. Once you get somewhat trained, things change. If you are not well-recovered, you simply cannot work hard enough to stress your ...


0

The short Answer: It is safe to do cardio daily. The use of "intense" really depends on your body. If you build up your routine by starting with 20 minutes of running daily and then the week after 30, 40, etc. eventually getting to an "intense" cardio workout, then it is fine. Throwing yourself into an intense routine every day without the build up may ...


1

Cardio can be good, but I'd recommend doing weights a few times a week aswell since you have a desk job and are inactive for most of the day. Putting on more muscle will mean you're burning more calories throughout the day while at rest. Weight training is also more fun than cardio on a machine in my opinion :) Good luck!


0

I would say don't worry about it as your cardio machine is probably innacurate anyway. Yes as you lose weight your metabolic needs go down, but all you have to do is readjust your calorie intake and keep going. FYI For more accurate calorie tracker is this from Journal of Sports Science http://www.braydenwm.com/cal_vs_hr_ref_paper.pdf Calories Burned = ...


1

Calisthenics (body weight exercises), my friend, is one of your best options. Most calisthenic exercises do not require a lot of equipment and are very effective as they're combinations of cardio and strength training. Not only can you perform them at home, you can even perform some of them at work, right by your desk. Of course, the most famous ...


2

You could try doing some circuit training while out on your walks. Things like push ups, sit ups, box jumps(if you find a rock/bench or something to jump on), there's so many things you could add in. Could maybe also try some HIIT(bit different to jogging as it's done in short intense bursts). Also could give yoga a shot. This can be done pretty much ...


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The Bare Minimum of Exercise Major health science organizations recommend a minimum of substantial aerobic activity and several strength training workouts per week. For instance, the CDC says that according to the evidence, Adults need at least: 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., brisk walking) ...


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Honestly, if you can do 30 minutes of cardio every morning, that's perfectly fine, so long as you realize that your diet has to be aligned with your goals as well. It seems like you have that covered though. Obviously, there is no way we can tell you that instead of 30 minutes, you should be doing 28 or 41 minutes, because we're all different, and even ...


2

With weight training, find a program (I do 5/3/1) and follow it exactly. In other words, you find a program (there are many, many programs), be honest about your lifting numbers, and progress just as it says from there. With cardio, no more than an hour really makes sense - you have to live a little, and pumping away on a treadmill for more than an hour ...


0

Different units and commands have their own fitness thing going on. Navy wide, there are minimum standards and in most of the Navy, especially once you've been in for a year or so, you're on your own to maintain your fitness. Some units, SEALs and CSAR units in particular obviously have much tougher fitness requirements. In most of the Navy, it's up to ...


4

One study reflects that 0 calorie drinks may actually cause weight gain: “On average, for each diet soft drink our participants drank per day, they were 65 percent more likely to become overweight during the next seven to eight years, and 41 percent more likely to become obese,” said Sharon Fowler, M.P.H., faculty associate in the division of ...


2

If you're talking about a flat bench press, and if you were to follow something like the Madcow 5x5 linear weekly program: You will gain ~5 pounds a week. You have 45 pounds to gain. It will take you 9 weeks. This is predicated that you aren't over trained, you don't have any injuries, you eat and rest well, and you follow the program properly. I'd give ...


0

I'll add a slightly different take on the other answer: Yes, you can do 2 or 3 hours of cardio in a day. But you should build up to it. You'll find that many cyclists and runners will do a longer workout or two on the weekend, but maybe just an hour on weeknights at a more brisk pace. A rest day isn't a bad idea either. The important thing that you've ...


3

You can definitely maintain and even get stronger muscle wise in 80 minutes a week. After taking a managerial role at my company while having two young kids I started a "different" workout to maintain. I noticed that I didn't gain a lot of mass but didn't lose any and definitely gained strength and composition (slowly). I hit each major body part 1 day a ...


1

If you stop exercising you will, after about three to four weeks, slowly lose muscles. Muscles are "expensive" tissue and will only be conserved if there is a need for. Depending on how much muscles you have and how active you are outside the gym, your body will reduce the amount of muscles. Muscles don't turn into fat, but when you start losing muscles ...


7

Go to one-handed desk pushups. Spread your legs a little more and leave the supporting hand off-centre: you will get a more intense workout, building strength in the arms and adding some additional core muscles. If you can do 25 with two hands you can probably do 5 with one - if needed, start against the wall and go lower as you build additional strength.


5

Since you are already getting up every hour to stretch, I would do the 25 pushups every hour, as that will add less than a minute to your stretching routine. As your endurance builds you can gradually increase that amount as desired. However, if you want to increase muscle mass and tone, then the approach you are taking is going to be of extremely limited ...


4

The sad truth is, if you can do as many as 25, you're not building strength by doing it any more. You're building endurance. You won't be getting leaner, or build bigger muscles. But if you're doing it anyway, do 25 every two hours instead, because you should be taking mini-pauses in your seated work-day regardless. Hell, once an hour would be even better. ...


5

I don't think you'll be able to survive for very long doing 3 hours of running (as an example) eating 1500 calories a day. 2,000 - 3,000 calories per day of deficit (depending on your needs) is really hard. I'm assuming this is for weight loss, and I think you'll have much better results following the tried and true mechanisms for fat loss and body ...


3

Always check with your doctor before attempting a new exercise program, especially if as in your case you have a problem. Although you have "flat feet" you may also have other problems that cause pain and swelling of your lower legs with walking or running. Your doctor will give you a diagnosis and may suggest a podiatrist (foot doctor) or physical therapy ...


3

I wouldn't say that the study is flawed per say, but it's not overly encompassing and is too easily taken out of context. It targets obese people who haven't done anything, and tracked them for ~5 months. This study to me is akin to the "you can eat Twinkies all day and lose fat". It's true in a very isolated sense, but zoomed out a bit and looked at it ...


3

Having read what you posted, I can’t say I’m surprised by the results. I think it bolsters the opinion that there’s no one perfect (”best”) way to achieve an individual’s fitness goals. Too often, we lose sight of the fact that we all react to training stimuli differently. Suggesting a specific training regimen or diet modification without prior intimate ...


1

This is a complete myth: there is absolute no evidence to suggest that weightlifting may stunt your growth. The reason that this myth came about was that by exercising, your body requires more calories and nutrients to make up for the increased rate of exertion therefore if you don't consume enough then your growth may be impacted.


2

Probably the biggest takeaway is that almost any exercise will work if done with sufficient intensity, and combined with the proper calorie deficit. Thus, clients should be free to pick exercises that interest them, that they can stick to. And I would advise emphasizing that those involved in the exercises did do them regularly and with intensity.



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