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7

I've seen you ask and answer questions, so I'm certain you have most of the theoretical answers you seek. Now, to make them realistic (aka broscience that's working for me). Don't eat when you are hungry. Eat when it's appropriate. Don't eat because you feel like it; eat because you don't want your body clinging to the fat you have. It's not just about ...


7

A difference of 0.3" (a little more than a quarter of an inch) is within acceptable measurement error on something like this. The answer to your question is: BMI does not matter for individuals A perfect example for the reason why is with the two tickets you included in your question: On Mar 4 2014 you had BF% of 16.2% and BMI 25.5 On Mar 23 2014 ...


6

It's a fallacy that fat people unleash bigger bolts of strength. Can fat people hurt you? Absolutely! Why? Because Force = mass X acceleration and fat people have a higher mass; with a decent speed, the force generated can hurt you. It's the same reason why a fat person will injure you if they sit on you; the force (weight = mass X gravity) the weight ...


5

Food plus lifting equals get bigger It seems like you're saying that when you walk a lot, eat moderately, and do nothing else that you lose a little bit of weight--likely fat, but perhaps also muscle. It also seems like you're saying that when you add heavy lifting and a lot of eating that you gain weight. Nothing about that is surprising: (Lots of ...


5

Hopefully, I can help you sort through some of the information. I think you have every right to be skeptical of the claims on the Stronglifts site, Medhi does tend to overstate things and not dig deep at all. However, broscience is still useful when actual science doesn't have any information on the subject. The good news is that there is still some ...


4

One possible explanation for the height discrepancy: consider that throughout the day, your precise height is not constant. In the morning after you wake up, you are actually slightly taller than you are in the evening when you go to bed. Another explanation is variability in posture, as well as measurement imprecision. As has been mentioned elsewhere, ...


4

BMI simply measures the relationship between your weight and height and doesn't care if the weight is muscle-based or fat-based. You're focusing on the wrong thing: your body fat in the first measurement was 16.3% and it changed to 13.3% in the second. The second value fell within the range of your ideal body fat. You also lost over 2-kg in body fat, all ...


4

One of my other issues is my diet I believe. My TDEE is calculated to be 2439 calories/day, How do you know that? What source? which if you take off 20% makes it 1952. I eat below 1952 every day but don't see any weight loss and I think it's because my body is used to what I eat. I don't think it works that way. If you are not getting ...


4

That's a very overarching question, but I'll do my best to answer it: First off, the activity you do does not matter that much if your goal is to lose fat weight. Although it does matter if you want to keep lean body mass (i.e. muscle weight), so let's dive a bit deeper into this. Basically, every diet is calories in vs. calories out. If you use up more ...


4

First of all, this all depends on the protein he is taking and some other life style aspects. My initial answer is that this is not a problem because supplements are simply meant to supplement your diet. getting 30 grams of protein from a shake isn't really different than getting 30 grams of protein from chicken or any other source of protein for that ...


4

What you're referring to is "spot reduction", which is the idea that you can reduce fat in one particular area. This is a myth, and proven to be untrue in numerous studies (2011 study and 1983 study). There was no significant effect of abdominal exercises on body weight, body fat percentage, android fat percentage, android fat, abdominal ...


4

Everybody loves anecdotes so I'll start with one. I got to pick the brain of this great bodybuilder named Bernie Cooper once on Christmas Eve in a bar in Edinburgh. The man obviously did have some "assistance", but he told me the only thing he ever changed when "cutting" was that he added some cardio to his routine. Anyway, the fact is this: You'll only ...


3

First, your BMI is something you can safely ignore given that you have ways to determine your body fat. BMI is an easy 'statistical' tool for getting rough 'population' obesity numbers. BMI for individuals does not have a dependable relationship to obesity and/or to obesity related health issues. Your body fat percentage is what matters, and looking at that, ...


2

Actually I have to disagree with Baarn. There is such a thing as "omentum fat" which is visceral fat located near the stomach. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_omentum. It is not terribly uncommon among men to have larger fat deposits here, which is actually underneath the abdominal muscles, which is why the belly seems harder. A more thorough answer ...


2

Your aim should not be to become fat, rather you should aim to gain healthy weight/build up muscle/gain some lean mass. To do this your body needs to be in a calorie surplus. I.e. you eat more calories than your body actually needs. These calories should be from a good source, i.e. oats, eggs, fish (If you are a pesco pollo vegetarian) etc. If you are ...


1

What are you goals? My experience (anecdotal and exercise physiology knowledge) says that for more broad ranging adaptions, 4-6 minute intervals are superior to very short term (i.e. 20 seconds). 6 minute intervals (at the highest relative intensities you would be able to maintain) largely stimulate both anaerobic (first 2-3 min) and aerobic pathways ...


1

From both personal experience and things I've read, losing belly fat is more about diet than exercise. Sugar intake, specifically, is something that should be severely limited when trying to lose belly fat. For most adults (myself included), alcohol is a major contributor of sugar intake. The point in my life during which I had the least amount of stomach ...


1

Carlories are "energy", yes. They do NOT equate to strength; strength is a function of how well the muscles are converting that energy into force. Stored calories do affect stamina, if you have trained your body to access the stored energy (eg, if you've learned to ignore the discomfort that comes from starting to relatively rapidly metabolize fat). Of ...


1

Calories in/calories out relates very well to the first law of thermodynamics. You consume calories, but they're never created or destroyed, they can only change forms. If you don't use that energy when its available, it gets stored as fat. At other times, it converts into the heat that each of our bodies give off. Think TDEE, or total daily energy ...


1

Keep the article at the back of your mind as a caution to not to under-feed yourself; besides that, there's little reason to think about it. If you exercise your body to a fatigue level, your body'll alert you before reaching this stage. If you pay attention to your body, you can easily identify when you've overworked it. If you do happen to fall into ...


1

Well I see people in my work succumb to "metabolic damage" in the sense that stress takes a toll on their physical/mental health. And I skimmed the article, from what I gather, the whoe "eat less exercise more" paradigm taken to the extreme can cause the same. The high cortisol and sympathetic stimulation can lower testosterone, mess with the thyroid, and ...


1

Listen to your body. As long as your energy level is staying high and you're hitting your workouts, then you're fine. Fewer carbs/calories will mean faster results. The key here is to keep listening to your body - you may feel energetic on those 2000 calories during the first week, but if that deficit starts to catch up with you and your energy levels ...


1

You said your main goal is "losing stubborn belly fat". Although you can't spot burn fat, if what you're doing now is achieving that goal for you (fat loss in general), and you are overall happy with the results you are getting and the training routine, don't change anything. Cardio combined with strength/weight training is a great way to burn fat while ...


1

I am not sure whether you actually want to be "fat" or look muscular and fit. You are actually looking towards having a more balanced and attractive physique. Getting muscular or getting thin, both requires effort and time and does not happen in a couple of months. You need to have patience and track your progress on a weekly basis. Diet and workout both ...


1

I recently started a nutrition plan based on very low carbs and low calorie with daily vigorous exercise, so it has made me curious about these body processes (fat and protein metablolism/catabolism). One thing is definite, it is a very complicated process and apparently not completely or widely understood, even by "experts"--so opinions abound. In ...



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