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9

Don't Confuse Size with Genetics and Training My former coach won the genetic lottery as someone who can just naturally get beastly strong. An example of that genetic pool, he took his mother to the weight room and she squatted over 300 lbs on her first day with no prior training. I'm pretty sure she was sore after that. There are several power lifters ...


8

Stop Making Excuses Don't tell me that fat doesn't make people stronger because it does. Of course many fat people are strong. Of course people get stronger faster if they aren't trying to stay under a certain weight while training. But there's that key phrase: 'while training'. The examples you cite fight sumo and lift weights. There's no magic here: ...


7

A difference of 0.3" (a little more than a quarter of an inch) is within acceptable measurement error on something like this. The answer to your question is: BMI does not matter for individuals A perfect example for the reason why is with the two tickets you included in your question: On Mar 4 2014 you had BF% of 16.2% and BMI 25.5 On Mar 23 2014 ...


7

I've seen you ask and answer questions, so I'm certain you have most of the theoretical answers you seek. Now, to make them realistic (aka broscience that's working for me). Don't eat when you are hungry. Eat when it's appropriate. Don't eat because you feel like it; eat because you don't want your body clinging to the fat you have. It's not just about ...


6

It's a fallacy that fat people unleash bigger bolts of strength. Can fat people hurt you? Absolutely! Why? Because Force = mass X acceleration and fat people have a higher mass; with a decent speed, the force generated can hurt you. It's the same reason why a fat person will injure you if they sit on you; the force (weight = mass X gravity) the weight ...


5

Food plus lifting equals get bigger It seems like you're saying that when you walk a lot, eat moderately, and do nothing else that you lose a little bit of weight--likely fat, but perhaps also muscle. It also seems like you're saying that when you add heavy lifting and a lot of eating that you gain weight. Nothing about that is surprising: (Lots of ...


5

Hopefully, I can help you sort through some of the information. I think you have every right to be skeptical of the claims on the Stronglifts site, Medhi does tend to overstate things and not dig deep at all. However, broscience is still useful when actual science doesn't have any information on the subject. The good news is that there is still some ...


4

One of my other issues is my diet I believe. My TDEE is calculated to be 2439 calories/day, How do you know that? What source? which if you take off 20% makes it 1952. I eat below 1952 every day but don't see any weight loss and I think it's because my body is used to what I eat. I don't think it works that way. If you are not getting ...


4

That's a very overarching question, but I'll do my best to answer it: First off, the activity you do does not matter that much if your goal is to lose fat weight. Although it does matter if you want to keep lean body mass (i.e. muscle weight), so let's dive a bit deeper into this. Basically, every diet is calories in vs. calories out. If you use up more ...


4

One possible explanation for the height discrepancy: consider that throughout the day, your precise height is not constant. In the morning after you wake up, you are actually slightly taller than you are in the evening when you go to bed. Another explanation is variability in posture, as well as measurement imprecision. As has been mentioned elsewhere, ...


4

BMI simply measures the relationship between your weight and height and doesn't care if the weight is muscle-based or fat-based. You're focusing on the wrong thing: your body fat in the first measurement was 16.3% and it changed to 13.3% in the second. The second value fell within the range of your ideal body fat. You also lost over 2-kg in body fat, all ...


4

What you're referring to is "spot reduction", which is the idea that you can reduce fat in one particular area. This is a myth, and proven to be untrue in numerous studies (2011 study and 1983 study). There was no significant effect of abdominal exercises on body weight, body fat percentage, android fat percentage, android fat, abdominal ...


4

Everybody loves anecdotes so I'll start with one. I got to pick the brain of this great bodybuilder named Bernie Cooper once on Christmas Eve in a bar in Edinburgh. The man obviously did have some "assistance", but he told me the only thing he ever changed when "cutting" was that he added some cardio to his routine. Anyway, the fact is this: You'll only ...


3

First, your BMI is something you can safely ignore given that you have ways to determine your body fat. BMI is an easy 'statistical' tool for getting rough 'population' obesity numbers. BMI for individuals does not have a dependable relationship to obesity and/or to obesity related health issues. Your body fat percentage is what matters, and looking at that, ...


2

Actually I have to disagree with Baarn. There is such a thing as "omentum fat" which is visceral fat located near the stomach. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_omentum. It is not terribly uncommon among men to have larger fat deposits here, which is actually underneath the abdominal muscles, which is why the belly seems harder. A more thorough answer ...


1

Just to recap our discussion. At your weight and height, you are not obese. I would highly recommend exercising and following your macros, that can be calculated here A very good site, to track your macros is myfitnesspal If would also look into something called intermittent fasting But, since you said your family has a history of diabetes i would strongly ...


1

I'm in favor of low carbohydrates for two primary reasons: Ketosis is legimate, effective, and safe way to cut down on body fat. There are examples of native people who historically ate very little carbohydrates for generations. Most of the sinister cheap calories in a western diet come from carbohydrates. Even following a "low carbohydrate diet" still ...


1

Wikipedia led me to this reference, which says 29% saturated, 65% unsaturated.


1

You are really asking two questions. Your first question is "what kind of training plan should I be using to improve my 5K running times?" There are a lot of different plans online; they will prescribe heart rate ranges, typically based on your age. Those aren't particularly accurate, but they are a decent place to start. It is also possible to set training ...


1

Regarding being thin and wanting to put some strength on, there's a very well written answer over here I'd recommend checking out. I usually skip meals or eat little. I drink a lot of juice (Apple Juice) which I know has a lot of sugar. Juice is pretty terrible to be honest: it's like all the bad parts of fruit with none of the good parts. Your body ...


1

The body is a funny thing. There is no real way to predict how and where it will store fat. The one observation I have made with my own body is that I typically lose fat first from the places I have most recently put it on. The hardest places to lose it are the places that have had it the longest. I am sure you have heard that you cannot spot reduce. This ...


1

What are you goals? My experience (anecdotal and exercise physiology knowledge) says that for more broad ranging adaptions, 4-6 minute intervals are superior to very short term (i.e. 20 seconds). 6 minute intervals (at the highest relative intensities you would be able to maintain) largely stimulate both anaerobic (first 2-3 min) and aerobic pathways ...


1

From both personal experience and things I've read, losing belly fat is more about diet than exercise. Sugar intake, specifically, is something that should be severely limited when trying to lose belly fat. For most adults (myself included), alcohol is a major contributor of sugar intake. The point in my life during which I had the least amount of stomach ...


1

Carlories are "energy", yes. They do NOT equate to strength; strength is a function of how well the muscles are converting that energy into force. Stored calories do affect stamina, if you have trained your body to access the stored energy (eg, if you've learned to ignore the discomfort that comes from starting to relatively rapidly metabolize fat). Of ...


1

Calories in/calories out relates very well to the first law of thermodynamics. You consume calories, but they're never created or destroyed, they can only change forms. If you don't use that energy when its available, it gets stored as fat. At other times, it converts into the heat that each of our bodies give off. Think TDEE, or total daily energy ...


1

Keep the article at the back of your mind as a caution to not to under-feed yourself; besides that, there's little reason to think about it. If you exercise your body to a fatigue level, your body'll alert you before reaching this stage. If you pay attention to your body, you can easily identify when you've overworked it. If you do happen to fall into ...


1

Well I see people in my work succumb to "metabolic damage" in the sense that stress takes a toll on their physical/mental health. And I skimmed the article, from what I gather, the whoe "eat less exercise more" paradigm taken to the extreme can cause the same. The high cortisol and sympathetic stimulation can lower testosterone, mess with the thyroid, and ...



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