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10

The short answer to your question is that the extra digestible fiber and denser construction of whole-wheat bread means that your stomach has to work harder to break the food down. This turns into more of a roiling motion that can splash acid around and cause heartburn. So the basic answer is 'yes'. However, you should absolutely not go back to eating ...


9

The more processed and isolated the nutrient, the easier it is for your body to digest and make use of it. That's as true for protein as it is for carbs and fats. That said, you will never have 100% absorption rate of any nutrient. Some of it will be lost in the digestion process, and the protein powders from GNC (much less Starbucks) are not as ...


4

You are right, the reaction to this book from the scientific community has been a complete silence. I would not call it pseudoscience though; there were scientific studies showing negative effects of high fiber diets for people with pancreatic insufficiency and certain metabolism deficiencies. Too much fiber could increase malabsorption, impair the ...


3

Typically you would prorate it. That means if 1525 kcal (or Calories) is 61% of 2500 kcal you simply multiply everything by .61. However, there are a couple things to consider: The amount of protein you need to consume to protect your muscles doesn't change. The body needs at least 21g of Fibre a day to stay "regular" (i.e. no constipation) In the ...


3

Fiber is, by definition, indigestible carbohydrate. It either gets processed by the bacteria in your colon or it goes on to the exit. If your gut flora uses it, the "good" bacteria will produce some vitamins and short-chain fatty acids from it (which you metabolize and are good for you) plus some toxins, and the "bad" bacteria will just create toxins. ...


1

Even the bullet points you enumerate early on are arguable for various people. For diabetics, you absolutely want a greater amount of calories from protein and fat - taking in 40% of your calories by carbohydrates is too many for a diabetic's damaged endocrine system to handle. For athletes, the distinction becomes even more complex. What sort of athletes ...


1

Accourding to the following, blending has no effect on fiber content per say. http://www.oprah.com/health/Does-Blending-Fruit-Reduce-Its-Fiber-Content Like the article says, the main issue, is that you digest a liquid faster than you do a solid. This is probably what your nutritionist means when she says the fiber becomes "more digestable". However, ...


1

I'd suggest you some diet tips: When calculating your RDA (Recommended dietary allowance) for calories, protein, Carbohydrates, fat, fiber, salt etc.first check these factors. Because RDA always changes with these factors Age, sex Height, weight Any disease condition (metabolic disorder) Bowel habits Physical activity (Exercise) Lifestyle (sedentary, ...



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