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12

There's an aspect not covered yet. Knuckle pushups place more stress on the bones of the hand compared to the open palm pushup. Martial artists take advantage of that fact as a way to toughen the bones in the hand so that when they punch something hard, the hand doesn't break. Essentially, the body responds by increasing calcium deposits at the knuckle ...


10

Good form is for safety. Deviating from good form means that you think that the situation is so high-stakes that it warrants risking your safety. So armed with knowledge, you can choose your own adventure. You need to be careful with taking cues from YouTube. It's possible that the people you watch have different goals than you, like hypertrophy rather than ...


8

Double OverHand (DOH) grip is most commonly taught to beginners for a couple reasons: It feels more natural It avoids the feeling of twisting inherent in mixed grip It's more important to start deadlifting that listening to complaints about how weird it feels. That said, there is a limit to how much you can hold that way. You can improve your grip using ...


8

The number one thing you can do is train with a coach who knows about good running form. Many cities have various track clubs that are friendly to people who are less than lightning fast. However, that costs money, takes time, and may not be ideal. One activity that I used to learn a lot about my running style was setting up a video camera to record me ...


8

The majority of studies show that squatting just below parallel is perfectly safe and in fact, even beneficial to the knee. However, there is a difference between just breaking parallel and squatting until your hamstrings hit your calves (ATG). My personal opinion is that even ATG squatting is safe for the knees and studies of weightlifters - who squat as ...


7

Footage would be great. I have to re-correct this in my squat form periodically. There can be a number of issues that contribute to it: Bar too high or too low on the back: pushes out of the optimal bar path, and can cause excessive leaning. Knees traveling too far forward: pushes the hips up and the upper body forward. Weak upper back or core: unable to ...


6

It's correct form. If your elbows are too much out, you are risking injury of front shoulder and shoulder joint. By placing elbows closer to rib cage, triceps is taking more load (from shoulders). 45° or lower is considered safe zone. If you want to try some of bench press modifications, you could try to place wrist much closer (putting load on triceps), ...


6

I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but after watching the videos you posted, what you are doing is barely a half squat. Your technique is pretty damn far off and it has very little to do with "heel flexibility". I strongly recommend that you start from scratch. Pick yourself up a copy of Starting Strength. This book should be a pre-requisite for ...


6

There is a certain technique of foot strike that runners use for distance running, and that's known as midfoot striking. Your issue, commonly known as runner's knee, seems to be likely from the biomechanical issue discussed in this article. In essence, if your footfalls are striking hard on the heel, then the entire shock of the impact is traveling ...


6

Short of getting coached directly, the best tool for the job is taking video. There are a number of digital video recorders that have at least an hour of video available on the device. When you are training by yourself, you want a video recorder that can stable enough for you to stand up and trust that it won't fall over while you are lifting. You may ...


5

The advice I was given by a professional physiotherapist was to concentrate on stride length, and landing on the back of the foot/heel (I pronate though, so this was probably foot shape specific). It may have been very generic advice and not something an Olympic champion would care about, but it helped my pace/lap time quite a lot. Squats and glute ...


5

I like to add a summary of my personal experience with open-palm and knuckle push-ups. I have done at least 100 push-ups a day since 1983, even when travelling (in airports and hotels). In 1999 I developed wrist pain and changed to knuckle push-ups, first on hard surfaces (until 2003) and subsequently on a towel or on carpet as a preventive measure for ...


5

Two benefits of doing push ups off your knuckles: You can extend your range of motion, which in turn puts even more focus on the chest. You avoid unnecessary strain on the wrists. For these reasons I prefer doing push ups this way. Although extending your range of motion is not always a good thing. If you have shoulder problems, for example, then you ...


5

Here's a link to Ripptone explaining how much to arch the back: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=lBNeeeTId1M Some people have a 'big' arch, this is the person using the legs/hips to drive the bar, usually intended to push heavy weight. So, neither is wrong, it depends on what your goal is: building strength or building ego by ...


5

In order to use your hips to get your legs up, they need some opposition. This means all the muscles all the way up to the bar have to be active and involved in some way. Simple check is, if you feel your entire trunk equally involved, oblique muscles working just as hard as your center line, you have enough shoulder activation. If it feels like you're ...


5

First, I don't think you have the correct notion of ATG based on this sentence: For example, if I lay on my side with my legs in line with my torso and try to pull one foot straight back, I can't get my heel to touch my glutes. In an ATG squat you are going down until your calves are in contact with your hamstrings. Simple physics state that two ...


5

Use a small foam block that is just the right height so that if you are barely are touching it with your stomach, your hips are neither sagging nor lifted too high. The foam block should be very soft, so that it's not actually capable of supporting you at all.


5

Everything depends on the coach; however, bad form will prevent you from lifting heavier weights. If anything, form is more important with power lifting where the goal is to have the highest total on the platform. That said, there is a decently wide range of what constitutes good form, and it comes down to finding a coach who can help you find your optimal ...


4

A mixed grip is stronger and allows for heavier weight to be held. This is generally the "default" grip for deadlifts and prevents grip from being the limiting factor in terms of how much weight can be lifted. (Note that it is a good idea to switch the mixed grip for even development.) An overhand grip is weaker overall, but can be used to strengthen your ...


4

You're probably past this point but the advice I give beginners about running form is to stop looking down while they run. My girlfriend improved her running form and speed remarkably in about 2 minutes just by following this advice. When you look down while running, you lean forward too much, your feet land too soon and your stride becomes more of a ...


4

My guess is your issue is any one of the following. You are resting the bar too far forward. I see a lot of people in my gym with the bar resting almost on their neck. This is very dangerous and hard to watch. It should be resting across your rear deltoid. Refer to the picture in @BerinLoritsch's answer to this question for proper bar placement. It should ...


4

A video of your movement would be very helpful. However, a common cause of this is poor hamstring flexibility. The good news is that squatting is a great way to stretch out that muscle. For now you might resolve this by spreading your feet further apart, which will allow you to sit your butt down further without tipping forward. Also, a good mental cue is to ...


4

Mobility & Chest UP! Without a form check video--which is really the gold standard, putting this text-based feedback to shame--this sounds like a mobility issue combined with not keeping your chest up. Your back and hips (and ankles, from the sound of your other question) are not flexible enough to get into a deep squat position while maintaining a ...


4

The barbell squat is primarily a quadricep exercise. Secondary muscle groups include glutes, hamstrings, lower back, and even abs. The best way to target your quads during a barbell squat is to keep your feet at shoulder width with your toes pointing out a little bit to avoid putting unnecessary pressure on your knees. If you want to activate your glutes ...


4

This problem is called "valgus" knee. Its is more common for females due to the anatomy - wider hip and slight larger Q angle. However, here are some very common problems for most people with valgus knee, especially during squatting and landing: Weakness in hip abductors Weakness in hip external rotators Pronated feet (flat feet) Weakness in posterior ...


4

You can lay down flat on your stomach and then lift your feet up. You don't only lift your toes off the ground, but you also lift your feet up to the point where your knees are also leaving the ground. You then repeat this for several repetitions. This will cause you to feel a certain burning sensation in the lower back muscles. The idea is, once you feel ...


4

No, a frog stance and a crane pose are not the same thing. That second picture is a terrible example of a frog pose, but the article you linked has a much better one here: As you'll notice the big difference is the lack of contact between the knees and the elbows that is in both of the photos you linked. Part of the challenge of the frog stance (and ...


3

The suits provide some compression, and more of a spring loading when you change from the eccentric to the concentric portion of the lift (bench press and squats). As a result, it will help you get out of the hole much quicker and more strongly. This in turn helps you lift heavier weights than you normally would. The unexpected side to lifting with the ...


3

I'm not a weightlifter, but I "tried" doing it years ago. From personal experience, you do not want to overbear yourself with large and heavy weights that are beyond your current ability level. One reason is to avoid injury that you might cause to yourself (especially if you work out alone). You don't want to overstrain your muscles or joints nor ...


3

I'm assuming you're doing a classic squat with feet and knees hip-width apart, knees pointing in the same direction as the toes and bending to 90 degrees at the lowest. In safe squatting form, in which knees stay above the shoelaces, the ankles are not too deeply flexed, so you shouldn't need any more flexibility than you'd need to walk. If your heels are ...



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