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6

The bottom line is you want your shoulder in a neutral position. That doesn't necessarily mean full scapular retraction, but it's a cue that helps a lot of people. Considering your level of experience, and the fact you came off of injury I would advise you to use that scapular retraction, but only to the point where your shoulder is in a neutral position. ...


4

When I start to pull, inevitably my knee angle "wants" to open first to the point that my back is horizontal before the bar actually leaves the ground This sounds fine. Fully horizontal is a bit much, but lots of people get to near-horizontal and that's the way it should be. There's no need to keep your back angle constant from your setup. It's very ...


3

Based on you not knowing what your shoulder muscles are called, I'm going to take a guess that you're not really doing any shoulder exercises to speak of, or at least over-emphasizing your bench press. A good rule of thumb for shoulder health is to overhead press at least as often, and more like twice as often, as you bench press. Additionally, you'll want ...


3

There are a few ways to obtain the information you want. Some colleges/universities offer a major in Kinesiology and Exercise Science. You may want to see if there is one in your area. They may provide learning programs available to the general public. A more widely accepted and cost effective source of information is to locate a certified fitness ...


3

Learning proper form in any exercise, is something that's hard to judge on your own. But that's not to say that you have to have a personal trainer with you. A lot of people these days post form check videos, where they film themselves from different angles doing an exercise, and post it online for response from a fitness community. I haven't seen any of ...


2

This has happened to me a lot over the years. I found it was caused by tightness of the levator scapulae and middle and upper trapezius and a weak lower trapezius and serratus. All largely sorted through fixing muscular imbalances, using a mixture of self myofascial release and targeted resistance work on the weak areas. Release tension in pec major/minor, ...


2

It may sound unnatural, but squeeze your glutes (butt cheeks) as hard as you can during the lift. It will prevent your back from bending. Stronglifts explains it very well. The section "Common Pains" explains how to avoid injury.


2

One thing that can happen as you bring your hands in is the tendency to shift your shoulders forward to compensate for being in an unnatural position. That tendency is something that you much not fall in to. Keep in mind: You have a hand placement that allows you to lift the most weight Every inch closer or farther apart will diminish your ability ...


2

If you have trouble with the close-grip bench press, but you want to target the pectoralis muscles more intensively, I'd suggest you implement some flies into your program instead, while working on your possible injury. The chest fly can be done with dumbells or cables, and can be done standing up, or lying down on a bench. Alternatively there are machines ...


1

I don't retract my shoulderblades fully, but engage pretty forcefully the muscles that retract the scapulae in most major exercises: front squat, back squat, deadlift, overhead press, pull-ups, and so on. If you're rounding your upper back forward during any of those then something is weak and wrong.


1

I dont think that there is a general approach, there are some practical advices and each person need to test the effiziency and benefit of them. Here are some recommendations that I follow, they might help you too: I contract while benching the whole movement through as I feel more stable, I also focus on keeping the shoulders low (away from the ears) ...


1

We do not receive wisdom, we must discover it for ourselves, after a journey through the wilderness which no one else can make for us, which no one can spare us, for our wisdom is the point of view from which we come at last to regard the world. -Proust Adhering to proper form means picking a form to hew to. Picking a form requires you to choose: ...


1

Without seeing you running, it's very difficult to determine much about your running form. I assume that you're keeping up speed with your peers, right? However, perhaps it's possible to guess away at this if we can get feedback from you. My first bet is that it's a matter of how upright you are. For whatever reason, it makes a large difference in the ...


1

I do something like this version of the dumbbell hang clean. Essentially: Stand up with the dumbbells at your sides or in front of you. Bend forward, maintaining the natural curve of the spine. This is also called a "flat back" or a natural back arch. Don't let the shoulders shrug forward and don't curl your back forward. When the dumbbells are just ...


1

There can be many reasons for muscle spasms/pulls in the neck area, including (in no particular order): Insufficient food: the muscles lack the glycogen stores required and overcompensate Insufficient sleep: your nervous system is impacted when you are in a sleep deprived state, and I've had most of the neck spasm issues when in this state Bad hydration: ...


1

Their answers hold weight... I've noticed the pull or tear when the weight was a little heavy or a lot heavy. Also every time you actually move your head forward or look down to do the weight, it's possible to strain or tear it. Keep good posture, eyes forward and head straight. Stabilize or don't use your neck while moving the weight.


1

Most people have horrible ankle mobility. You can see it on their squats -- ankles cave in, as do the knees. They cannot track their knees over their foot and get into biomechanically disadvantaged positions. Often the lack of hip and back mobility confounds the problem. This can be addressed by working up to overhead squats with a bar or dowel. I would ...



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