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4

When I start to pull, inevitably my knee angle "wants" to open first to the point that my back is horizontal before the bar actually leaves the ground This sounds fine. Fully horizontal is a bit much, but lots of people get to near-horizontal and that's the way it should be. There's no need to keep your back angle constant from your setup. It's very ...


3

The reason for that advice may have resulted from a study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in March of 2011. Riemann, BL, Limbaugh, GK, Eitner, JD, and LeFavi, RG. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius activation differences during heel-raise exercise with three different foot positions. J Strength Cond Res 25(3): ...


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So I believe it depends on your progression. When you just start training there is really no need for a mixed grip until you can deadlift with good form and reach heavier weigths. However doing mixed grip only on really heavy sets (>90% of 1RM) can result in injury due to not getting used to mixed grip. So training it is important. Handeling really heavy ...


2

Under standing circumstances I would say look at your posture, if you're naturally inclined to a more donald-duck-like posture (your but sticking out) you should squeeze your glutes and thus facillitate backwards tilting of the pelvis. When you're more of a pink-panther-type (your but tucking under) you should stick your but out more, ?squeezing your lower ...


2

My Recommendation I advocate deadlifting with a double overhand with no hook grip for as many warm-up sets as possible, in order to develop grip strength. For heavy warm-ups and work sets, I think a hook grip with chalk is the best way to develop grip while still moving heavy weights. I don't use the mixed grip, and would only advocate it for PR attempts ...


2

This strategy looks like an emulation of the effect of a slingshot, a device which mainly sees use with people benching heavier weights (300+). I have not used this device, but I've spoken with users and they recommended it, mainly for dealing with shoulder injuries. When a shoulder injury occurs, especially for people benching these sorts of weights, it ...


2

I tend to descend to the left a little bit as well. Conscious effort to fix the form in a complex movement and then adding weight on top of that will probably not help the problem. I personally have found that too much conscious effort can be effective if you know for sure that you are hitting the right muscle groups because it forces them to work harder ...


1

I do something like this version of the dumbbell hang clean. Essentially: Stand up with the dumbbells at your sides or in front of you. Bend forward, maintaining the natural curve of the spine. This is also called a "flat back" or a natural back arch. Don't let the shoulders shrug forward and don't curl your back forward. When the dumbbells are just ...


1

For reference, here's a 2013 meta analysis from Chris Beardley on the various muscle recruitments (checked by EMG) during squats. There's not much there that really answers your question directly, but it's still a worthwhile read on the topic, especially because it graphs different levels of involvement across individual muscles in different squat stances. ...


1

Most people have horrible ankle mobility. You can see it on their squats -- ankles cave in, as do the knees. They cannot track their knees over their foot and get into biomechanically disadvantaged positions. Often the lack of hip and back mobility confounds the problem. This can be addressed by working up to overhead squats with a bar or dowel. I would ...



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