Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Take a dumbell bar and tie one end of a length of rope to it. Tie the other end to one of your weight disks. Hold the dumbell bar out in front of you, one end in each hand, and rotate it so the rope wraps around the bar. The weight should rise with the rope creating resistance. Twist the bar one way until the weight touches it, then reverse the direction all ...


10

Grip will eventually be a limiter, but there are things you can do: Hold the bar at the top for an extra 10-15 seconds on your last rep Change your grip to a stronger hold Do grip specific work The first option will help get your grip stronger pretty well. There does come a time when the weight on the bar increases faster than your grip strength, ...


8

If you're deadlifting about as much as you weigh with a double overhand grip, there's no need to worry about your grip as a specific thing. The deadlift itself will develop your grip strength just fine for a while longer, with just a minor tweak or two. The Least Intrusive Grip Improvements The important thing to do is to challenge your grip as much as ...


7

Grip is a big part of the deadlift, pull-ups, pull-downs, etc. It consists of not only muscular strength, but also the skin toughness and pain tolerance to hold a ton of weight. It is very common for grip to be the limiting factor early on. Don't give up - grip strength is incredibly useful in all aspects of life (working with tools, climbing, opening jars ...


6

If there's a place to do pull-ups, that would be better than nearly anything with those light weights. If you can do a few chin-ups, wrap a towel around the bar to make it thicker. Or, hang a sturdy towel over the bar and grip the towel directly. These are both well-known grip strength workouts that have the added benefit of working the rest of your body ...


5

I had this problem as well, where I was able to lift the weight easily enough, but my grip was giving out (I almost dropped the bar at one point). Your grip strength will increase as you progress with deadlifts, but sometimes you will need more so your grip can keep pace with your progressive overloading. Here are a couple of tips that have helped me out a ...


5

Instead of trying to do a special exercise just for grip strength, work it into whatever other exercises you do by squeezing the bar as hard as you can. Not only will this increase your grip strength, but it will help you create more body tension so that you can lift more and get more benefit from each workout.


5

I've been climbing, training for climbing, and reading books on the subject for a long time. If you are new to climbing, you need as much volume at the easiest grades possible. This is the best way to condition all of your body, as well as improve your technique. Go to the gym, do all of the easiest problems. Repeat them over and over. This will make ...


4

There are two answers to your question. Improving forearm strength is usually done through a combination of exercises. Grippers are good and generally you squeeze, hold for a second, and then slowly release. Repeat until you're too sore to continue. Do it again the next day. If your hotel rooms have door molding, you can practice finger tip hangs from ...


4

As I see it there are two things going on: not seeing the results you want from the activity you are doing, and not understanding why strength is not linear. I'm going to attack these in reverse order. Take a look at the chart below: Depending on the training stress, your body is too fatigued to demonstrate any kind of strength. It needs to recover, or ...


4

Hand Injury Hands can easily be injured because the tendons must glide thru a sheath. You describe “The binding of finger was not smooth, as if it was blocked. When the blockade was released, there was such click.” This American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons info link gives a nice diagram and explanation of how the tendon gets stuck and then ...


3

If it's just your grip strength (forearms giving out), you could always try to incorporate some forearm exercises into the end of your routine. I always try to do some Farmer Walks (with heavyish dumbbells) and some bending the back wrist curls. I sometimes try to reverse the motion of the curls and do it over a bench instead. If it's your fingers (hands) ...


2

I do a lot of rock climbing, and do a finger specific warmup for it, otherwise I get popping and clicking in my fingers, just like you describe. I don't use heavy grippers like you describe, so maybe someone else will have a more relevant post. I use grip putty like this. Some sort of physical therapy putty might also work. I usually squeeze it with my ...


2

I have no idea of cricket (other than some scenes from British movies that didn't help me in any way understanding the rules) and I'm not sure what a bowler does so I don't know how these translate but I do some gripping exercises for martial arts and use basically homemade tools for this. The easiest to build is a tennis ball. I have one in my office and ...


2

I recently purchased 200, 250 and 300 lb grips from Heavy Grip (http://heavygrips.com/). I'm closing the 200 with about 5-7 reps with both hands and just starting to close the 250's. So, to determine real progress, I would suggest grips with know resistance. In regards to having both hands un-equal, I think that's common for beginners and probably shows up ...


2

Chad gave a lot of good advice - the best way to build more climbing endurance is to climb more, even if you have to do laps on the easier routes. But you might also want to suppliment your climbing with some basic training for pullups and your abs. Technique is necessary, but "correct technique" sometimes depends on a certain threshold level of ...


2

Find extra, extra large jars, e,g. big pickle jars. [go to a local deli...they might have empty one's that they get rid of]. Start light, fill with some water. Close lid. Grip lid evenly with all fingers. You can hold standing for a specific time, or walk around with them (preferred). As it gets easier, add more water. You can do one hand at a time ...


2

When lifting heavy I use a combo of over/under hand grip (left and under and right hand over and on the next lift I reverse this) - I found that this gives me the ability to lift heavier (I also do the same when I get fatigued doing pull ups). You may also want to look into straps( http://www.bodysmart-usa.com/Consumer/Weightlifting/WLAC.htm), but don't use ...


2

There's two main types of grip: pinch grip and crushing grip. The exercises you use are different depending on what you need to develop. It will also help to know what you need to carry and for how long. That will determine if the problem is really technique related or strength related. There's a decent article with 7 grip exercises to get you started. ...


1

Don't listen to the idiocy of the weight lifters around here who buy 8 dollar supplements thinking it helps them. It's pretty simple to build wrist strength (wrist is where we get grip power). Knuckle push ups are amazing to build your wrist, knuckles, and forearm strength. Boxers and Martial arts do this exercise to build muscles in order to punch harder ...


1

If overhand and underhand grips are both painful, I can't think of anything other way of holding it that would help. So maybe the better question is what tool you can use to make it hurt less: Time and determination. There's no substitute for good old-fashioned skin toughening. Weightlifting gloves. Padded to fix exactly this problem. There are plenty ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible