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4

I sweat a lot. When my grip slips because of sweat, I blame the sweat and not the bar. This approach works pretty well. I wear sweat-bands on my wrists and carry chalk. I wipe the sweat from both sides of my hands onto a towel or my shirt, then chalk my palms copiously. This keeps my grip mostly dry.


4

This a multitude of things you can use. Here's a list that I suggest: Lifting straps Chalk Sand (I do this when I do my spartan races, right before the pull up bars) Of course, if there isn't any sand, I suggest bringing a little chalk to rub on your hands before you do your chin ups. This dries up your hands and enables you to lift yourself much easier. ...


4

I do barbell rows overhand, like exrx recommends and like Arnold does and like this StrongLifts-doing guy does. I think underhand would turn them into curls when they're challenging. StrongLifts specifically recommends against the underhand grip.


4

It really isn't that big of a concern. The biggest difference in stress on the back is that the shoulders are hit slightly differently. The overhand grip spreads the weight of the bar across the whole shoulder, and the suppinated grip hits between the spine and shoulder blade. So yes, there is a slight imbalance. But a big part of it is just like your ...


3

The biggest factor of the grip is whether you'll twist it off or snap it off. The wooden one you posted on the left is at a high risk of that happening. The carbon fiber one on the left could still be at risk of twisting, but at least it won't have part of it snapping off. Ideally, it'll be a single piece, rather than having the grip glued to the shaft. ...


2

For support grip and crush grip you use two different muscles (both are used, but in either movement, there is a different main muscle). For the support grip, you flex the distant part of your phalanges (fingers) by the action of the flexor digitorum profundus. For the crush grip, you flex the proximal part of your phalanges by the action of the flexor ...


2

In general, neutral grip presses are much easier on your shoulder. This is true of the dumbbell bench press, pull ups, etc. By easier, I mean less stress on the connective tissue (ligaments and tendons), rotator cuff, as well as being more mechanically advantageous. That means you can load it heavier with a neutral grip (palms facing) than the open grip ...


2

Although chalk works amazingly for grip (as a rock climber I can confirm from experience), I'm going to try to provide another answer rather than repeating what the others have already answered. You could just obtain grip tape (like for tennis rackets) and wrap it around the bar (it's made to survive the elements, and wouldn't be damaging the bar, I don't ...


2

I agree with the gist of the prior response -- it is mostly a matter of personal preference. I coach and I never tell paddlers which to use. I would add that the T grip can make any problem with blade angle in the transverse plane (whether the power face is turned you or, more rarely, away from you, rather than straight back) easier to notice and correct. ...


1

Get a thick rubber band, and do them a lot. I had the same problem as you, but I started doing crossfit, and there they are the standard movement. I did not really get that much stronger, but I just did them a lot, with a band to begin with. I think it is mainly a motor skill, where you need to practise activation other muscles. Don't feel bad if it is ...



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