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7

What you are describing is called Isometric training. It’s a little used, and much misunderstood, form of training in which the muscle tenses without changing its length. Each contraction is typically done for 6 to 10 seconds at a specific angle. For example, think of a bodybuilder holding a front double biceps pose. During a competition, poses are ...


4

I've written a previous answer about this, which I would recommend reviewing. In short, DOMS is not a good indicator of muscle stress, growth, recovery, or training effectiveness. It is brought about through a combination of factors, primarily eccentric exercises. From Wikipedia: Muscles undergoing heavy eccentric loading suffer greater damage when ...


3

Short answer: Yes. But don't. Long answer: It is a huge waste of your time, because you're not going to be doing more than 1-2 muscles at a time. And the set of muscles that can be worked like this is very slim. For instace, how are you going to train your lower back? Seems like the only reason you'd do this, is because you don't want to go to the gym. ...


3

100%, I've been training for about 5 years now and there was one spell were due to work I was living off about 4-6 hours sleep a night for a month. I still exercised and dieting like i normally would but I actually loss muscle strength. Sleep is were all the hard work pays off, its the chance for your body grow and recover. Without the proper recovery you ...


2

I have a the same problem I usually do lots of dumbbell side raises on low weight just to get the shoulder pumped, this exercise really adds mass to the side of the shoulder (1 muscle of 3). Also the wide shoulders are an illusion created by a thin waist so you tend to look broader if you have a small waste. So basically loose the love handle :). But I must ...


2

Weight lifting will not affect your general growth, including height, as long as you don't starve yourself. If you want broader shoulders and a slimmer waist, do shoulder exercises and lose fat.


1

If I recall the optimal amount of sleep for "standard" athletes is around 7h30 (+/- 30 minutes) going on the higher side if your other recovery factors (food, stress, etc.) are diminished (e.g. you're dieting down and training hard, you're in the middle of a high volume cycle, you live a stressful life, etc.). I'd recommend you read sleep, part 1 and sleep, ...



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