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7

What you are describing is called Isometric training. It’s a little used, and much misunderstood, form of training in which the muscle tenses without changing its length. Each contraction is typically done for 6 to 10 seconds at a specific angle. For example, think of a bodybuilder holding a front double biceps pose. During a competition, poses are ...


6

The number of sets you do increases what we call the total volume of work being done. The more volume of work you do, the stronger signal your body gets that it needs to grow. If you do only one set, you aren't giving your body a very strong signal to grow. If the set is heavier than last time (even if you push it to failure), you give a slightly stronger ...


4

I've written a previous answer about this, which I would recommend reviewing. In short, DOMS is not a good indicator of muscle stress, growth, recovery, or training effectiveness. It is brought about through a combination of factors, primarily eccentric exercises. From Wikipedia: Muscles undergoing heavy eccentric loading suffer greater damage when ...


3

100%, I've been training for about 5 years now and there was one spell were due to work I was living off about 4-6 hours sleep a night for a month. I still exercised and dieting like i normally would but I actually loss muscle strength. Sleep is were all the hard work pays off, its the chance for your body grow and recover. Without the proper recovery you ...


3

Short answer: Yes. But don't. Long answer: It is a huge waste of your time, because you're not going to be doing more than 1-2 muscles at a time. And the set of muscles that can be worked like this is very slim. For instace, how are you going to train your lower back? Seems like the only reason you'd do this, is because you don't want to go to the gym. ...


2

Protein powders are not different than "natural" high protein foods such as cottage cheese, poultry, eggs, etc in terms of "being natural". It's sort of real food with other ingredients removed so you'll be able to consume a lot of protein without consuming other organic compounds. In addition, I actually read about a few researches which state that high ...


1

If I recall the optimal amount of sleep for "standard" athletes is around 7h30 (+/- 30 minutes) going on the higher side if your other recovery factors (food, stress, etc.) are diminished (e.g. you're dieting down and training hard, you're in the middle of a high volume cycle, you live a stressful life, etc.). I'd recommend you read sleep, part 1 and sleep, ...



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