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8

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From ...


7

There is scientific evidence to support the opposite... Essentially Hans Selye put forth a basic theory around 1925 that governs our understanding of stress and adaptation called General Adaptation Syndrome. This theory has provided the foundations of both vaccinations and all exercise theory. In essence, when your body is put under some form of stress, ...


5

There are a very big difference between just completing a certain distance at a modest speed and running competitively for a good finishing time (e.g. with a time-goal). The following is true if you just want to finish, not if you run competitively. As I learned it many years ago, to finish a race up to and including Marathon, the rule is that you should be ...


4

I would suggest at least a few of your longer runs be at night, around the same time as the race will be. Most of the time, the reason for the early morning start times is a combination of it being cooler in the morning, plus there is (usually) less traffic to have to reroute for a half marathon route than during a race that occurs closer to mid-day. Other ...


4

Ask yourself this question: What's the likelihood of re-injuring the finger? The finger will take as long as it takes to get better, and running isn't going to change that significantly enough to worry about it if at all. As long as there is a low likelihood that you are going to hurt the finger again doing any activity, there is no reason to avoid ...


4

HR is a very accurate measure of effort, and as delayed as any other natural parameter, call it breathing, perceived effort, fatigue (or even sweat to give another example). Your heart doesn't know if it's cold or hot, uphill or downhill. Any factors that increase/decrease your heart rate will likely impact your performance The only thing that might be ...


4

Your max heart rate will happen typically at the end of the marathon, when you're making your final push for the finish line. Comparing your heart rate throughout the majority of the marathon to this maximum isn't very meaningful. Maybe you just worked really hard right at the end and you'd end up with your steady heart rate being a lower percentage of your ...


4

Do 3 main exercises each week in order to increase pace: Do repetitions of about 3 * 400m at 90% of capacity with 2 minutes off once a week. This should feel hard, and it's ok if you cannot do 3 to begin with. None of your other runs should come close to the difficulty of this. Do this twice a week. Do one "long run" a week, where you try to run, without ...


3

So you're primarily a lifter but want to compete in a half-marathon. It sounds like you're control but here's what I would suggest. Find time each week for a long, slow distance run on a day when you're not lifting. This is the key to any long distance training and you will have a very difficult time if you don't do this. This is where the ...


3

Interesting conversation and results. I like to use what is known as the Yasso 800 method named after Bart Yasso. Instead of using your half marathon time, base it off of repeated 800 meter efforts. To test, run a series of 800 meter controlled efforts with ~400 meter jog in between. The average time in minutes and seconds of your 800s will be your ...


2

You don't really need to follow a specific plan, make up your own. With a 1:31 HM, you've already got pretty decent speed. One of the better "programs" I've seen is from a guy named BarryP on the slowtwitch forums, it's called 3:2:1. Basically, you do 3 short runs, two medium and one long. Each one is double the previous run. So, if your short run is 40 ...


2

When I ran my first 20km (almost HM, which is ~21.1 km), I had previously run 5-10km, and twice 12km and once 17km, with about 1-2 runs per week over 1,5 months. Plus I trained acrobatics 3 times a week. I managed to finish, in just under 2h (so roughly 10km/h), but could barely walk up stairs the two days after. Half a year later, my first HM, I had ...


2

Your best frend is knowledge about your distance. It's 5 km, and you know that You will have to run the whole of it You will not need to run more So, first, you need do save energy for kilometers 2-5, thus do not run your maximum during the first km. Second, you can just stop and relax after you finish the 5-th km, so you can spend the remainder of ...


2

The only reason not to practice two days in a row is because the body gets fatigued, and a fatigued body will not have the energy and time to adapt to the training. How does the body get fatigued? When you perform one type of training, say long distance running, you are taxing one of several energy systems in your body, specifically, your muscles. In the ...


1

Considerations should be for when to eat. You need to be fuelled for the race, but not so full you are uncomfortable to race. YOu will need to see what works best for you. Whether to eat your last meal later or whether to fuel the race with snacks or a carbohydrate drink. The only way to know this is to practise during training. If it was me I could ...


1

As others have said, you can't do a marathon on half marathon training. But if the marathon is say 3 months after, you could use the half as part of your build up to the marathon. You need to teach your body to use fat for fuel,which is learnt during the long training runs. Your body cannot store enough energy through carbohydrates for the duration of ...


1

Blackened and/or losing toenails is very common among very long distance runners (half marathon and longer). One of the primary causes is the foot being too loose in the shoe, and being rammed into the front of the shoe repeatedly. Oddly enough, buying shoes one size bigger can lead to worse problems, and still not solve the original problem, as the ...


1

For ease, you could use Hal Higdon's Novice #2 program. I recommend removing weeks 2 and 4 since you only have 16 weeks if you start next week. Hal's program is straight forward but good for 1st time marathoners as it gets them ready for enduring the distance. Obviously you have good talent so if you'd rather learn some more, I'd recommend checking out ...


1

Seems you are just a smidge under the recommended low-limit weekly mileage (25 km - 40 km) for the Beginner Half-Marathon training program from Cool Running. But that program is for people who would like to finish around 2 hours which meet your requirements for a sub 2:30 hour finish. Cool Running also has some speedwork drills to help you increase your ...



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