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7

At a first glimpse the standing desks seem like another "improvement" companies throw to an item to make customers upgrade and re-buy the same thing. Essentially it's just a desk, right? That's what I thought until I started my current job which provided me with a standing desk. My job is sedentary and very static. I experimented and on some days remained ...


7

First let's look at what your acquaintance actually does to the diet itself. Suppose that his normal TDEE is 2500 kcal. That means, at his regular activity level given his job and physique, training not considered, he'd need about 2500 kcal per day to supply his body with the energy it needs. Eating that, there would be neither weight gain from excess ...


6

Yes, it's entirely possible. Exercises such as squats are compound muscle exercises, which means they work many muscles at the same time. These are generally considered as "must have" because they do work so many muscles, and generally give good results. The other exercises are what are called "isolation" exercises, since they mostly work one muscle group ...


6

The bottom line is you want your shoulder in a neutral position. That doesn't necessarily mean full scapular retraction, but it's a cue that helps a lot of people. Considering your level of experience, and the fact you came off of injury I would advise you to use that scapular retraction, but only to the point where your shoulder is in a neutral position. ...


5

a realistic weight loss is around 1 pound a week. If considered obese then 2 pounds a week is fine. If the bodyfat level is below 10 percent then half a pound a week is probably best. Muscle gain for a beginner who eats the right amount of protein, enough food and follows a good mass building routine consistently I would say slightly under half a pound of ...


5

Research is pretty divided. On one end, there are claims that it reduces performance and muscle growth by slowing muscle reaction and displacing calcium: Regular intake of caffeine reduces your muscles strength and resistance training performance by slowing down the muscle contraction and relaxation cycle. High intake of caffeine also displaces ...


5

Though it's a very general question, here's a few guidelines I follow for a healthy life: Go active. The Western culture have become way too inactive, a way of life our body is not accustomed to. Especially if you spend hours in a deskjob, make sure you exercise or perform some jogging on daily basis. Saying that, you shouldn't go hard & heavy everyday....


5

A recent meta-analysis of 23 published studies is MacEwen, MacDonald, and Burr, "A systematic review of standing and treadmill desks in the workplace," Preventative Medicine 70(January 2015):50-58. The article is here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 Quoting from the paper's summary: Treadmill desks led to the greatest improvement in ...


4

The safety bars should be set a few inches below the lowest the bar could conceivably go during a successful squat. This way, if the squat goes wrong in any way, you just lower yourself to the bottom of your squat. Do this fast if necessary; release tension in the core, if necessary; jump forward (if the bar is on your back) or backward (if the bar is in ...


4

According to Dr. Jos Verbeek of The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, "What we actually found is that most of it is, very much, just fashionable and not proven good for your health."


4

G_H covered more or less everything regarding this topic but there is something else that's pretty crucial that most people are completely uneducated about. First, it's important to understand that fat isn't simply just a storage tank for excess calories or "potential energy." Fat is actually an endocrine organ, like a thyroid or adrenal gland, for example. ...


3

Here's the secret to many of these makeovers or rapid weight loss success stories: Start with somebody who is already active and fit, but has to take some time off due to injury. Have them gain a lot of weight while recovering from the injury. After they've recovered, have them go back to their old active and fit lifestyle and add in whatever miracle ...


3

I hurt my back in a football injury in 8th grade. Speared right in the middle of lower back. Was out a few days and have now had the exact same problem that you have for the past 20 years. My family has pictures of me stretching out and dying in lines at DisneyWorld because I wasn't able to workout on vacation. Why do you feel better? Blood flow and ...


3

As AlexL suggests, since you are in a power rack, you can simply set the safeties to a couple inches below squat depth. Then if you need to bail, simply lower your squat beyond your usual squatting depth, rest the bar the safeties, and wiggle your way out. Similarly for the bench press. You should be able to set the safeties in such a way that when your ...


3

Great question! Especially coming before actually having had bail out (that's the terminology) of a squat. I'm guessing you're back squatting. When failing to stand up during a rep you'll at least have some power left to slow the weight down on the way back down. Use this opportunity and don't hesitate. Release your hands, sit up so the moves backwards, ...


3

How have you done the chin-ups? Take care that you keep tension all the way during the repetition especially at the bottom of the exercise. Also if you go to wide you can injure your rotator cuff. Here is some good advice on chin/pull-ups: http://jasonferruggia.com/the-shocking-truth-about-chin-ups/ it simply says that the best way to do those exercises ...


3

Specifically, I think your biggest issue will be cognitive impairment. The image of two kids in a basement toking and curling is honestly quite hilarious, and probably isn't going to be too much of a problem in and of itself. More to the point: Curling is a terribly inefficient exercise unless you're a rather advanced body builder, which I'm going to ...


3

Correlation - two events happening together (like observing if carrying lots of muscle and living long go often together) shouldn't be confused with causation (hyphotesizing the more muscle you have, the longer you live). High protein, higher calorie diets, typical to people that carry lots of muscle, add strain to your liver and kidneys. Lifting heavy and ...


3

You are correct, the human body wasn't made to sit down for long periods of time. It is very unnatural, but with the information age, it is basically inevitable. I work as a software developer and understand your pain. There are a few things you can do. You can get a stand up desk, so that you limit straining your lower back and engraving an unnatural ...


3

Anecdotal, I've been using a standing desk for about a year. I write software so it used to be ~8hrs sitting. Now I'm always standing. Dont notice a difference tbh. Some days my legs and lower back are sore if I happened to walk to work that day. If anything, now when I sit for a long time my lower back feels some soreness on getting up.


3

If depends on your regular exercise routine. If you only do light exercise then it's not a problem to skip exercising for a week or longer. People who do heavy exercise almost every day may experience problems. Heavy exercise burns a lot of energy (1000 Kcal in my case), it is burden on the body that has become part of the regular routine. You are used to ...


2

Assuming it is legal to smoke marijuana where you live, I would suggest waiting until after you work out to enjoy a smoke. Smoking while your body is under stress from the weightlifting makes it harder to reap the benefits of working out.


2

To be honest, assuming you're not a good collegiate or elite athlete, as long as you're not eating McDonald's every day, your running won't be affected as much as you might think. Eating well will help you feel better, perform better, and be healthier, but most food will be just fine to sustain consistent running. However, you are probably interested in how ...


2

Congratulations on already getting a good start. You are young and can create your own healthy habits and a lifestyle that will serve you well for the rest of your life. There are some good answers on this site about getting back in shape so I'll refer you to those for more information. Diet is really key. If as you say you are eating snacks (junk), ...


2

Train hard, and recover harder. This is a very complete schedule, but I would warn you to be careful of the other part of the equation that is recovery. Your body is a machine that is tuned to respond to external stress (dieting, strength training, aerobic training are all stressors) and that stress needs to be increased slowly so as to not cause yourself to ...


2

For the heel-strike, the short answer is that neither one is inherently more or less healthy. The natural tendency among walkers is to heel-strike when walking along a smooth surface and to use toward the toe when walking along elevated or uneven surfaces. The next time you go for a walk outside, do it barefoot and pay close attention to your feet. In my ...


2

A healthy diet means a healthy body, I'm not saying to start a diet, but to eat healthier, more greens, fruits, vegetables, less processed/fast foods. Hair loss can be related to stress, and judging by your work, study field I'm assuming you can be put under a lot of it, B-complex can help you out lowering down your stress levels, there's also some shampoos ...


2

It means that there is 100g of fat total, and out of that, 30g is saturated.


2

Every time you have an opportunity to do something physically exerting, do it. Health & Safety Executive recommends: short, frequent breaks are more satisfactory than occasional, longer breaks: e.g., a 5-10 minute break after 50-60 minutes continuous screen and/or keyboard work is likely to be better than a 15 minute break every 2 hours; ...


1

Exercise-induced (EI) hypersensitivity disorders contain EI-asthma, EI-bronchoconstriction, EI-rhinitis, EI-anaphylaxis and EI–urticaria. They can occur in both recretional athletes and elete athletes as mentioned in the question. The reasons for EI hypersensitivity contain airway dehydration (risk for EI-asthma and EI-rhinitis), increasing exposure to ...



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