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Being immobile in one position (whether sitting or standing) for long periods of time is just not good for you. Sit too long and you get all those posture problems and what not. Stand too long and blood pools to your calves. The natural state of man is to go between periods of rest and motion. Either you are laying around loafing or MOVING (walking, ...


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A recent meta-analysis of 23 published studies is MacEwen, MacDonald, and Burr, "A systematic review of standing and treadmill desks in the workplace," Preventative Medicine 70(January 2015):50-58. The article is here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 Quoting from the paper's summary: Treadmill desks led to the greatest improvement in ...


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G_H covered more or less everything regarding this topic but there is something else that's pretty crucial that most people are completely uneducated about. First, it's important to understand that fat isn't simply just a storage tank for excess calories or "potential energy." Fat is actually an endocrine organ, like a thyroid or adrenal gland, for example. ...


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First let's look at what your acquaintance actually does to the diet itself. Suppose that his normal TDEE is 2500 kcal. That means, at his regular activity level given his job and physique, training not considered, he'd need about 2500 kcal per day to supply his body with the energy it needs. Eating that, there would be neither weight gain from excess ...


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Anecdotal, I've been using a standing desk for about a year. I write software so it used to be ~8hrs sitting. Now I'm always standing. Dont notice a difference tbh. Some days my legs and lower back are sore if I happened to walk to work that day. If anything, now when I sit for a long time my lower back feels some soreness on getting up.


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According to Dr. Jos Verbeek of The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, "What we actually found is that most of it is, very much, just fashionable and not proven good for your health."


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At a first glimpse the standing desks seem like another "improvement" companies throw to an item to make customers upgrade and re-buy the same thing. Essentially it's just a desk, right? That's what I thought until I started my current job which provided me with a standing desk. My job is sedentary and very static. I experimented and on some days remained ...


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If depends on your regular exercise routine. If you only do light exercise then it's not a problem to skip exercising for a week or longer. People who do heavy exercise almost every day may experience problems. Heavy exercise burns a lot of energy (1000 Kcal in my case), it is burden on the body that has become part of the regular routine. You are used to ...


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Every time you have an opportunity to do something physically exerting, do it. Health & Safety Executive recommends: short, frequent breaks are more satisfactory than occasional, longer breaks: e.g., a 5-10 minute break after 50-60 minutes continuous screen and/or keyboard work is likely to be better than a 15 minute break every 2 hours; ...


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You are correct, the human body wasn't made to sit down for long periods of time. It is very unnatural, but with the information age, it is basically inevitable. I work as a software developer and understand your pain. There are a few things you can do. You can get a stand up desk, so that you limit straining your lower back and engraving an unnatural ...


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I agree with most of the above. But please remember to Enjoy life. There is no reason to live a long and healthy life if you spend all of it being worried about making it healthy or long enough. Live life for life's own sake, life is not a Travelling Salesman Problem to be solved. So, if I were to be so bold, I'd amend Neria's answer a little: Go ...


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I agree with Neria answer, but he missed one crucial point: Cold showers (cold exposure in general) has immunostimulating effects. You can see for example this study http://jap.physiology.org/content/87/2/699.short The cold showering is often overlooked, because it is way too painful in comparison with exercise and diet.


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Though it's a very general question, here's a few guidelines I follow for a healthy life: Go active. The Western culture have become way too inactive, a way of life our body is not accustomed to. Especially if you spend hours in a deskjob, make sure you exercise or perform some jogging on daily basis. Saying that, you shouldn't go hard & heavy everyday....


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Correlation - two events happening together (like observing if carrying lots of muscle and living long go often together) shouldn't be confused with causation (hyphotesizing the more muscle you have, the longer you live). High protein, higher calorie diets, typical to people that carry lots of muscle, add strain to your liver and kidneys. Lifting heavy and ...



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