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6

Again, this is something that is subjective and going to vary from person to person. I generally monitor my HR a few times during the week first thing when I wake up, and occasionally when I'm just sitting around watching TV. These will give you baselines. When I finish a workout, I'll take my HR immediately, and once again in a minute or two. These are ...


5

Most definitely have it checked. Stress tests are one of the ways that cardiologists check for abnormalities in heart function, as the heart may exhibit dysrhythmia at that time (Under workload such as you are when running), and be perfectly normal at other times. It may be a touch of pleurisy (inflammation of the outside lining of the lungs) from the ...


4

The main things to look for in a heart rate monitor for exercise workouts is its accuracy, readability, functions and ease of use. Accuracy - Check your radial pulse and compare it to the heart rate monitor for accuracy. At rest you can check it for 60 seconds. During exercise you can check your pulse for 6 secs and multiply by 10. If you need a heart ...


3

Sure, it's a valid resting HR, but I don't think it's what you want. It is going to be different than a resting HR taken while you're awake, which is the generally accepted usable number. Other than academic interest or determining disease patterns (Generally done with a Holter monitor), I can't think of anything that uses a sleeping RHR as a base.


3

You can use max heart rate to determine training zones assuming you can get an accurate max heart rate. There are several calculations you can use to guess a max heart rate zone. However, max heart rates can very drastically and in many cases is NOT an indicator of overall health. Some people have really high max heart rates because they have a very high ...


3

Yes it is, this is the Formula when you dont know the VO2max (Maximal oxygen consumption) Male: ((-55.0969 + (0.6309 x HR) + (0.1988 x W) + (0.2017 x A))/4.184) x 60 x T Female: ((-20.4022 + (0.4472 x HR) - (0.1263 x W) + (0.074 x A))/4.184) x 60 x T HR = Heart rate (in beats/minute) W = Weight (in kilograms) A = Age (in years) T = Exercise ...


2

The strap has two areas that measure the heart rate by measuring the bio-electric impulse that naturally occurs when your heart beats. The strap itself is the measuring device, and the pod you snap on collects the impulse and transmits it to a receiver. The monitor begins its job as soon as the buttons are snapped in. In short, the strap does not need to ...


2

I think it comes down to preference as long as it takes your heart rate accurately. I prefer the HRMs that provide a strap that goes around your chest. Most machine will pick up on this so you won't always need your watch (unless you have timers set up on them). You can test the watch by finding your pulse (in your dominant hand) on the thumb side of ...


2

The galaxy gear actually links to your phone and can't do much without it (certainly not GPS), so it's not going to solve your problem with carrying your phone around. I believe the MIO alpha strapless monitor might be the sort of thing you are looking for ... there a review of it here. But that still won't give you GPS. GPS watches are rather pricey and ...


2

I just tried it again and now it works. I have no real idea why it works today, but didn't yesterday, but I'll describe what I did as precise as possible, so others might get some useful information out of it: Yesterday (didn't work) Activated Bluetooth on smartphone Put transmitter on strap, put strap around chest. Paired transmitter with phone. I'm not ...


2

Short answer: NO If you think critically about the activities you perform during weightlifting, and the activities that the fitbit tracks, you'll understand why. Let's dig in a little deeper: Fitbit tracks steps taken (i.e. pedometer) It estimates calories burned probably by the cadence of those steps and the total number taken It does not track heart ...


1

For your specific task (calculating burned cals), no matter what fitness band you choose, it's still a calculation to figure out how many calories you've burnt. With any calculation, there's a level of tolerance and you need to be able to accept the tolerance. If you're just worried about the number of calories burned, you could calculate it yourself and ...


1

O2 Saturation can, for the most part, be ignored. If your O2 Saturation levels are low, then your lungs are not getting enough oxygen to your blood. Are you not breathing very much? You have to breath more when you exercise. Did you just complete a very hard exercise (like cycle to the top of a very large hill)? Your blood may have just used up a lot of ...


1

There can be a couple things going on here: The strap needs to be wet to ensure good measurement of your heart rate. If you start dry, it takes time for sweat to do its job and the early readings can be thrown off because of it. The electrical impulses from the headphone wire can be interfering with the sensors. This is more probable if you listen to ...


1

Normal heart rate recovery is a decrease in your hr of 20-25 bpm (in 1 minute). For a fitter person it would be 30-45 bpm (in 1 minute). Abnormal heart rate recovery is usually defined as 12 or fewer bpm (in 1 minute). For the number 12 this is the ref


1

Alpha is strapless. It is not clear if it stored everything on the device, but technically it can beam continuously to a SmartPhone, and there seems to be some apps for it (I am investigating) Somebody edited in this:A review is here The review actually describes one day of continuous recording with a smartphone app (Bluetooth). Seems it worked well, ...


1

Timex Ironman Race Trainer Pro lets you sync with your computer and is compatable with either a PC or a Mac. I don't know if it meets your needs otherwise. It does have a strap and I don't know if you can recharge it.



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