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8

First, a bit about physiology. Just like some people have big feet and some people have small feet, some people have big hearts and some people have small hearts. Those that have smaller hearts have higher heart rates in general; their resting rates won't be as low and their maximum rates may be higher. That's just natural variability. It's also generally ...


6

Again, this is something that is subjective and going to vary from person to person. I generally monitor my HR a few times during the week first thing when I wake up, and occasionally when I'm just sitting around watching TV. These will give you baselines. When I finish a workout, I'll take my HR immediately, and once again in a minute or two. These are ...


6

Heart rate is extremely variable, and can go up or down with environmental factors such as heat or cold, foods containing stimulants like caffeine or depressants such as alcohol, standing up versus lying down/sitting, etc. The two ways that I usually use to recommend for using pulse as a gauge of fitness and/or overtraining, is to take it every morning as ...


2

Climbing steps will raise the heart rate more than walking. Generally, that is a good thing; you get more of a workout, burn more calories, and improve your aerobic fitness. If you are generally good help, the more stairs the better.


2

There are a couple of ways to use heart rate to estimate fitness. Take it as soon as you wake up in the morning. Lower heart rates are better. Take it immediately after stopping exercise (Such as a run) and then again a few minutes later. Both of these will require tracking, so that you can get a good estimation of your heart rate over time. If you ...


2

Exercise will help reduce your blood pressure, but you need to understand this is a case where a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Your blood pressure is spiking during exercise because your heart is working harder to pump blood to flush nutrients to, and waste away from, your muscles. The harder you work, the harder your heart has to pump blood, so ...


2

The reason for the difference in these two results is that the second formula that you cite is not a direct heart rate zone, but it rather is an assessment of heart rate reserve (HRR) (Karvonen formula). HRR is the difference between your maximum heart rate (MHR) (Either predicted or measured) and your resting heart rate. The theory is that as you get ...


2

The 'fat-burning zone' is a relatively unproven idea on heart rates and fat loss. If you wanted to you can look at the two results and split the difference and aim for about 133-135. However, how accurate will your heart monitor be in practise? If you are interested in weight loss, any substantial amount of cardiovascular activity combined with a calorie ...


2

Your gross oversimplification is roughly OK when you are comparing one species against another. It breaks down completely when you try to apply it individually. To provide a parallel, BMI correlates to body fat in a way that is statistically significant, but when applied individually may give the wrong impression about the amount of fat someone carries. ...


2

I had the same thought when I watched some documentary about that. Unfortunately I couldn't find any references either. What I did, though, was to start studying medicine, and things started to make sense. When you exercise there is an acute increase in heart rate. That increase is short lasting, and depends on your oxygen debt (thats what exercise ...


2

While I'm not as familiar with how Crossfit classes are structured, I am familiar with using a heart rate monitor for barbell training. I used to use it to time when I should start the next set so that I could keep the training pretty dense, but be relatively assured that I would hit the required reps. I'm getting back to using it to time when to do the ...


2

I think you may be overdoing the run, even considering your weight and training history. When they say run in the typical couch to 5k (c25k) program, they merely mean a jogging pace. If you ARE doing nothing more than a jogging pace and still hitting heart rates that are that high, I would go for an actual clinical stress test. (That's probably not a bad ...


2

Heart rates can trend lower in a pool, because your body is horizontal and your heart is not fighting gravity to get blood back up from the extremities. It's along the same principle as your heart rate is lower when lying down than when standing. As far as the cardiovascular, a high heart rate does not automatically increase your cardio fitness. It's ...


1

It's doubtful your heart rate was in sync; you can't really state that without monitoring. You can measure your stride: it's usually around 160 (strides per minute), with a lot of conventional running gurus touting 180 as better for a variety of reasons. Your breathing and stride can be matched up and this whole thing is known as locomotor-respiratory ...


1

There are times when your heart rate monitor will not measure the correct rate. For example if you chest is too dry or two wet or it is moving around and you loose connection. My Garmin HR monitor will often read my initial heart rate at 225 bpm for the first couple of minutes. I know my HR is not that high. (Actually physically counted it once when it read ...


1

Your heart rate will stay quite high for a while after your high intensity interval, this is perfectly normal. The period of time it stays high will reduce as your fitness improves. When i do interval training I will be looking for my heart rate to settle back down to around 65-70% of maximum before starting another high intensity interval. Basically at the ...


1

There is no simple formula, since both examples you provided could tell you different information about your current fitness level. You could probably run much longer at a HR of 160 than you could at 185. At 160, you may have the fitness to run a marathon. At 185, you may not be able to run much farther than a 5k. Is one "better" than the other? No. It just ...


1

It's not clear what training your advisor has, but it would be a great idea to consult with your physician, especially if there is a family history of heart problems. If you physician has concerns, she might order an exercise stress test to look for possible cardiac issues. As for your question, if you are just starting an exercise program, it's a good ...


1

The two main things you can keep track of are Resting heart rate - low is good Heart Rate Recovery - high is good


1

I had a look and was not able to find any evidence of harm from stair climbing. On the contrary, stair climbing is positively correlated with good heart health in previously sedentary women and post-college males. Unless you are at risk of heart issues, moderate stair climbing is no more dangerous than other activities.


1

You are within the normal limits. Anything above 60 beats per minute and below 100 beats per minute is normal for a resting heart rate. Once your heart rate dips below 60 bpm, you are in Bardycardia (means slow heart). After breaching 100 bpm you are in Tachycardia (means fast heart). Typically people that are more physically fit (cardiovascularly, not ...


1

The "fat burning zone" is a badly misinterpreted piece of information that has somehow become written in stone among exercisers. Your body burns fat at all times during exercise, the proportion of fat to other energy sources just varies according to how intense the workout is. Additionally, while you may exercise longer at a lower intensity, the total ...


1

I think that cyclists might do that, but it isn't necessarily optimal training. When I was cycling more (on road) I was advised to spend a lot of time (read: up to 4+ hours at a time) at <70% of my max heart rate, then once I was conditioned, include short bursts of speed at rates above my lactic threshold. There was a notion from more experienced ...


1

Palpitations can be a result of many things going on with your heart. Atrial Fibrillation, 1st 2nd or 3rd degree heart blocks, and a few others come to mind. The important thing to note is any time you heart starts doing something abnormal, even if you aren't sure if it is a normal response, CALL YOUR DOCTOR. Most exercise induced palpitations can be worked ...


1

Normal heart rate recovery is a decrease in your hr of 20-25 bpm (in 1 minute). For a fitter person it would be 30-45 bpm (in 1 minute). Abnormal heart rate recovery is usually defined as 12 or fewer bpm (in 1 minute). For the number 12 this is the ref



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