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5

First every HR monitor will read your HR differently. To get an actual reading you will need to do a Vo2Max test at a Doctor. 2nd You are listing quite a large range for 30 minutes. There is a difference between 30 minutes at 171 and 30 minutes solid at 190. What is your average? Finally, the VO2Max is only attainable in the lab and a formula is only a ...


5

A little while ago I was playing Dance Dance Revolution and finally managed to make it through the most intense song I'm currently capable of without dying. That is, running out of health meter in the game. But I also didn't die physically. I wear a heart monitor while playing and at the end it showed 203 BPM. My age at that moment (it's about a month ago) ...


3

The relationship between your: resting, maximum and recovery rates has been shown to correlate with your bodies ability to consume Oxygen (VO2max), which itself correlates with the conversion of fats and sugars to ATP, to fuel your muscles. So a few pulse measurements is a fairly commonly used and easy means to assess / estimate fitness. Have a read of "101 ...


3

As Julii alludes to, "zones" are pretty much arbitrary, as you are burning fat as a fuel in all zones, just the percentage to which it contributes to the whole is different for different effort levels. As you get higher in intensity, the more you rely on stored carbohydrates (glucose), and the lower in intensity, the more you rely on fat. They are both still ...


3

There is a rule of thumb that anything below 80%HRMax is working within the aerobic zone, whereas above you are heading towards threshold and anaerobic zones (being able to sustain these harder efforts for less and less time). Personally, when training aerobically, I aim for roughly 75% and not higher, even when it comes to hills. There is thought within the ...


2

I suppose those are really good questions, because most the formulae just work on rules of thumb & probably we're all too individual for the formulae to work perfectly for everyone reliably. But the question makes me wonder if the whole idea of zones is just a bit hokey, since the transition points are probably not fixed even for individuals; probably ...


2

Your max heart rate is the maximum your heart will beat at and can be determined with a stress test designed to push your heart to that level. All of the formulae are for estimating a maximum heart rate based on a statistical analyses of measured max heart rates. Survey of max heart rate studies Those estimators really should include confidence intervals, ...


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Option d) Get lucky and find a bunch of slightly overweight but otherwise well trained and motivated guys who took it really easy uphill for the majority of the course and some huge teams near the end to draft. Was struck by the competition devil and did lead for quite some distance but tried to keep my peak pulse below 160 bpm. No issues up to 3:00 and ...


1

Firstly, well done! That is great progress over 12 months. Welcome to Physical Fitness SE. Whether you should continue to train at your current rate is entirely down to your body. You need to listen to your body and understand if it needs more food/rest to keep up with the exercise you are doing. I know a few ultra marathon runners in their late 50s, ...


1

I think you should c) not do something you aren't ready for. Sorry to be a bummer, but unless you've worked up to a level where a 120 km bicycle race seems like a fair challenge that might be difficult but not too far outside of your comfort zone, trying to force it seems like setting yourself up for either disappointment, injury or a very long recovery ...


1

Your cardiovascular fitness and genetics are likely to play a larger role on your heart rate than your body fat% Normally I would recommend long durations of lower intensity exercise in order to build cardiovascular exercise (long slow runs, etc) however you say "I feel I am quite adapted to this routine". Can you tell us what your resting heart rate it? ...


1

Exercises with kettlebells can be as hard as barbell work, sprinting or high end sport activities if done correctly. 'Kettlecise' sounds like a group class which is typically aimed at anybody. So it might not be suitable for someone already quite fit. Try it out and then increase the weights as necessary. A 8kg kettlebell in a class feels a lot different ...


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If you enjoy it and feel great (and still do, after a week) then you aren't doing damage. But you may not be optimising your results either... Perception of effort is a better guide to exercise intensity than HRM and "rules of thumb" about training zones. If you can train for 30 minutes at steady output (as measured by the exercise bike) then you are ...


1

Heart rate: yes, it's possible that your heart rate was elevated. After very strenuous or prolonged and difficult physical activity, your heart rate tends to be elevated. Sometimes, in sports such as running, athletes become overtrained, which means that they ran too fast for too long (a matter of weeks or months), and their body couldn't recover fast enough ...


1

Two ways, but first figure out what the dizziness feeling is or at least make sure your training with someone else who knows they need to keep an eye on you. I cant think of a time I was dizzy after stopping fast, so that would scare me. So you know, to compare, my heart rate doesn't drop too fast after a certain point. After training at 160 bpm it will drop ...


1

Short while ago i did dinghy sailing for a couple of hours. The wind was strong but i was sailing with little effort under reduced sail. My heart rate was very high not because of physical exertion but out of alertness. My watch predicted that i burnt 1.800 calories in two and a half hours which is waay off. The formula does not include factors driven by ...



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