Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

I agree with doing a self-administered test. The tough ones aren't fun, but you'll know the truth. Run a 5k race or time trial hard, running the last 1k-800m increasingly faster. Sprint hard to the end. Find a long, hard hill (e.g., ~2 minutes from bottom to top). Run up it 2-3 times. Push hard as you get to the top. Run 2km on a track, increasing pace ...


4

220 - Age for maximum heart rate is one of the worst myths in sports. Your maximum heart rate may be less than 179, or it may be much more. For example, I am currently in my late 40's, and I regularly hit in the high 190's on hill sprint cycling workouts. There are various step tests and self administered tests that you can do outlined on the web, I would ...


2

After a training session you increase the metabolic demand on the body. That is, by breaking down muscles during strength training, you are sending a signal that they have to adapt and get stronger. They do so by increasing anabolism; water goes into the muscles to produce more efficient chemical processes, amino acids follow, waste products are removed. All ...


2

Heart rates can trend lower in a pool, because your body is horizontal and your heart is not fighting gravity to get blood back up from the extremities. It's along the same principle as your heart rate is lower when lying down than when standing. As far as the cardiovascular, a high heart rate does not automatically increase your cardio fitness. It's ...


2

There are times when your heart rate monitor will not measure the correct rate. For example if you chest is too dry or two wet or it is moving around and you loose connection. My Garmin HR monitor will often read my initial heart rate at 225 bpm for the first couple of minutes. I know my HR is not that high. (Actually physically counted it once when it read ...


2

Your gross oversimplification is roughly OK when you are comparing one species against another. It breaks down completely when you try to apply it individually. To provide a parallel, BMI correlates to body fat in a way that is statistically significant, but when applied individually may give the wrong impression about the amount of fat someone carries. ...


2

I had the same thought when I watched some documentary about that. Unfortunately I couldn't find any references either. What I did, though, was to start studying medicine, and things started to make sense. When you exercise there is an acute increase in heart rate. That increase is short lasting, and depends on your oxygen debt (thats what exercise ...


1

If my heart keeps pounding graciously for one hour, will this help aid weight loss in any way? No. Weight loss occurs when you are in a caloric deficit (eat less than you usually do)


1

As your level of fitness increases, the cardiovascular system gets more and more efficient at delivering oxygen and necessary nutrients to the muscles throughout the body - so the fitter you get, the more "effort" (as in physical work) you can put in at the same heart rate. If you get a heart rate monitor and always run at exactly your "optimal fat burning" ...


1

The max heart rate is genetically defined and decreases with the age, but there are young people with a "low" max heart rate and there are also old people with "high" heart rates. And both is ok with no health risks. Hope I could help you.


1

The stroke volume increases if you exert yourself more. The better trained you are, the more the stroke volume will increase as you exercise harder, which means that the heart rate will increase by a lesser amount. http://www.livestrong.com/article/403152-why-does-stroke-volume-increase-during-exercise/ Stroke volume increases depending on the type of ...


1

Im older than you (42) but my rest heart rate is at present 63 bpm too. Surprisingly, 140 bpm is another coincidence as well: I have it really hard to go higher than that at the stationary bike. I recently managed to achieve 150 but I had to push so hard that my knees hurted during days and I stopped biking altogether. I think it is a good sign that you ...


1

Max heart rate is not the benchmark for performance. VO2 Is also one component along with muscle endurance. You can not push the heart to go over a certain range in order to achieve a physical goal. Also, the body has very well defined mechanics to control the heart rate voluntarily which might not be altered as such...


1

Different people have different size hearts, and that will effect their maximum heart rate. I knew a women who had a working heart rate about 220; she just had a small heart. If you doctor has cleared you, I would not worry about it. It is generally better to use a perceived exertion scale for workouts instead of basing on heart rates unless you have a ...


1

I agree with Geoff Hutchison, but I also have to add that an exercise you don't know or you haven't done many times are always more physically demanding than an exercise which you perform for years, because your body remembers movements, so it seems easier to you.


1

Your maximum heart rate depends considerably on the activity. I haven't done crossfit before, but certainly you're involving more muscle groups than running. Biking and running have different HR zones because of weight-bearing vs. sitting. I suspect your HR zones for Crossfit and running are simply different. It sounds like you're working hard with both ...


1

A similar question was asked of Cecil Adams in his Straight Dope column about the differences in heart rate between exercising and caffeine. I think that the central takeaway is similar in both cases. Cardio exercise is not about raising the heart rate — that's just a handy metric for measuring relative effort — but about exercising all of the systems of the ...


1

You are really asking two questions. Your first question is "what kind of training plan should I be using to improve my 5K running times?" There are a lot of different plans online; they will prescribe heart rate ranges, typically based on your age. Those aren't particularly accurate, but they are a decent place to start. It is also possible to set training ...


1

This is a common and a good question. But, it is not an easy question. This is because there are several factors that influence what the "target" heart rate (HR) should be. These factors include: Goal (e.g. lose weight, race a sprint triathlon, race a half ironman). Activity (e.g. biking or running). Time (i.e. as you gain fitness, your heart rate zones ...


1

It's doubtful your heart rate was in sync; you can't really state that without monitoring. You can measure your stride: it's usually around 160 (strides per minute), with a lot of conventional running gurus touting 180 as better for a variety of reasons. Your breathing and stride can be matched up and this whole thing is known as locomotor-respiratory ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible