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Heart rate is extremely variable, and can go up or down with environmental factors such as heat or cold, foods containing stimulants like caffeine or depressants such as alcohol, standing up versus lying down/sitting, etc. The two ways that I usually use to recommend for using pulse as a gauge of fitness and/or overtraining, is to take it every morning as ...


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I think you may be overdoing the run, even considering your weight and training history. When they say run in the typical couch to 5k (c25k) program, they merely mean a jogging pace. If you ARE doing nothing more than a jogging pace and still hitting heart rates that are that high, I would go for an actual clinical stress test. (That's probably not a bad ...


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Your gross oversimplification is roughly OK when you are comparing one species against another. It breaks down completely when you try to apply it individually. To provide a parallel, BMI correlates to body fat in a way that is statistically significant, but when applied individually may give the wrong impression about the amount of fat someone carries. ...


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I had the same thought when I watched some documentary about that. Unfortunately I couldn't find any references either. What I did, though, was to start studying medicine, and things started to make sense. When you exercise there is an acute increase in heart rate. That increase is short lasting, and depends on your oxygen debt (thats what exercise ...


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While I'm not as familiar with how Crossfit classes are structured, I am familiar with using a heart rate monitor for barbell training. I used to use it to time when I should start the next set so that I could keep the training pretty dense, but be relatively assured that I would hit the required reps. I'm getting back to using it to time when to do the ...


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Heart rates can trend lower in a pool, because your body is horizontal and your heart is not fighting gravity to get blood back up from the extremities. It's along the same principle as your heart rate is lower when lying down than when standing. As far as the cardiovascular, a high heart rate does not automatically increase your cardio fitness. It's ...


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There are a couple of ways to use heart rate to estimate fitness. Take it as soon as you wake up in the morning. Lower heart rates are better. Take it immediately after stopping exercise (Such as a run) and then again a few minutes later. Both of these will require tracking, so that you can get a good estimation of your heart rate over time. If you ...


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It's doubtful your heart rate was in sync; you can't really state that without monitoring. You can measure your stride: it's usually around 160 (strides per minute), with a lot of conventional running gurus touting 180 as better for a variety of reasons. Your breathing and stride can be matched up and this whole thing is known as locomotor-respiratory ...


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There are times when your heart rate monitor will not measure the correct rate. For example if you chest is too dry or two wet or it is moving around and you loose connection. My Garmin HR monitor will often read my initial heart rate at 225 bpm for the first couple of minutes. I know my HR is not that high. (Actually physically counted it once when it read ...


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It's not clear what training your advisor has, but it would be a great idea to consult with your physician, especially if there is a family history of heart problems. If you physician has concerns, she might order an exercise stress test to look for possible cardiac issues. As for your question, if you are just starting an exercise program, it's a good ...


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Your heart rate will stay quite high for a while after your high intensity interval, this is perfectly normal. The period of time it stays high will reduce as your fitness improves. When i do interval training I will be looking for my heart rate to settle back down to around 65-70% of maximum before starting another high intensity interval. Basically at the ...


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There is no simple formula, since both examples you provided could tell you different information about your current fitness level. You could probably run much longer at a HR of 160 than you could at 185. At 160, you may have the fitness to run a marathon. At 185, you may not be able to run much farther than a 5k. Is one "better" than the other? No. It just ...


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The two main things you can keep track of are Resting heart rate - low is good Heart Rate Recovery - high is good



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