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7

It is possible to train the human body into needing much less sleep. It is sleep quality and not amount that counts. I have heard about people from military elite educations, who make their body used to no more than 4 hours of sleep at night. And they are still fit and surprisingly energized the next day ready to continue their rough training. ...


7

Everyone is different. I wouldn't be able to workout even just 3 days a week if I was only getting 6hrs of sleep, but maybe you'll be able to. Experiment and observe :) Watch for signs of overtraining and if it happens cut down on the workouts (or preferably, try to increase how much you sleep). The type of workout is also important. I've noticed that ...


6

Interval training of any kind would count: swimming, sprints, barbell exercises, et cetera. So would high-intensity exercises done for short periods, whether you repeat or not. Twenty-rep barbell squats, for example, certainly count as high-intensity conditioning. So do burpees, and kettlebell swings, cleans, or snatches done for time (e.g. 5 minutes) or ...


5

Can my current regime still be classified as HIIT? Yes, most definitely. The time intervals you're using are short enough and the numbers you posted make it sound like you're doing very well so far. What is an effective way of gradually increasing the intensity of the overall workout? You have a few options... Option 1 - Gradually increase ...


4

One work-out routine for high-intensity is "Tabata", see this search on this site: Search:tabata and this question: What is tabata? How effective is it? Answering your question, you would do 20 seconds of burpees, rest for 10 seconds and repeat this for e.g. 8 times. That would take you about 4 minutes. The more fit you are, you can add more sets. ...


4

No danger for the muscles, joints or ligaments really. If you are used to walking and spend several hours taking a walk outside with a friend will that be bad for your body? Doing a lot of push-ups will just develop endurance, if that's what you want then go for it. Last time I checked the world record for non-stop push-ups was 10,507 and was set by Minoru ...


3

The bottom line is that you need to burn Calories, and have a way of measuring the Calories you are burning. If you have a heart rate monitor that is calibrated to where you are right now, you'll have a pretty decent indicator of the progress you are making. That said, the most amount of Calories I've burned in one session was about 1,400 Calories over 1.5 ...


3

HIIT stands for High Intensity Interval Training. The "interval" portion suggests short duration intervals followed by rest intervals. The "High Intensity" portion does suggest that you give a maximal effort during that short interval. However, for this technique to be effective you must include the short rest intervals to allow for recovery so that you ...


3

HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) as you describe is a very acceptable, if not a prefered method of training. According to the Tabata study: .. adequate high-intensity intermittent training may improve both anaerobic and aerobic energy supplying systems significantly, probably through imposing intensive stimuli on both systems. Can HIIT be ...


3

Take another day off so that you can sleep in and give your body a chance to repair. The body repairs and strengthens itself in the time between workouts, and continuous training can actually weaken it.


2

See the answers on my similar question from March 2011. Both guys who answered said that the type of muscle fiber has presumably no influence on the agenda of the workouts.


2

There are several ways to improve your work capacity. The following work pretty well: Start with longer rest times, and shorten them each time. For example 1m work, 2m rest for one session. Then 1m work, 1.5m rest the next session. Multiple times a day. Essentially this is a variation of the previous point where some of the rest is much longer. Keep ...


2

The two previous answers detail two DIFFERENT workout protocols. Answer # 1 details HIIT, which is High Intensity Interval Training and as answer # 1 suggests the "interval" is necessary for this to be considered HIIT. To achieve HIIT, train 90 - 100% of your maximum capacity (not your MHR which is really only a guideline and does NOT necessarily measure ...


2

That is a form of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). HIIT is an effective conditioning tool that improves markers like your VO2 max, your cardio capacity, and your fat burning potential. I say potential because the actual fat burning depends on the exercises used, etc. Typically, you burn more Calories in a shorter period of time. In essence, in ...


2

It seems like the exercises are a form of Tabata interval training, see Tabata questions on stackexchange and http://tabatatraining.org/. The benefits this exercise versus running from my personal experience are: that very few people can run that intensive for 30 minutes probably less likely to cause injuries in knees, legs and hips and you also work more ...


2

When you perform an exercise in high reps, you're preparing your body for enduring long-time load. The body will adjust towards its most efficient way of sustainably performing under these circumstances, which is by having small muscles - they burn less energy. That's how best marathon runners tend to look like - quite lean. When "toning", you very likely ...


2

Besides Dave Liepmans answer, I would like to add: High intensity cardio is when your physcial exercise is so hard that oxygen isn't sufficient for the energy demands, that is, you create an oxygen deficit, see EPOC . Typically, this can't be done for longer periods of time and is stressful. If you overdo this and doesn't balance it with lighter workouts, ...


2

I'd just like to clarify - there's a difference between interval training and HIIT. What you are doing is most likely interval training. HIIT is meant to be short periods of max effort. In other words, sprinting as fast as you possibly can for short intervals with short rests. I recommend trying this outdoors because sprinting at max speed is difficult on a ...


2

The awesome thing about HIIT is that it isn't just a cardio, but it is also a muscle building form of exercise. Allow me to explain. When a person runs on a treadmill for about 30 minutes at a steady pace, they are in essence getting an endurance workout because the fibers that are getting burned are the slow twitch ones responsible for endurance. When a ...


2

My advice would be to continue. If you have a normal life with all sorts of commitments, you your are bound to miss work-outs and not follow all dietary advice during the 60 days that the program prescribes. This shouldn't matter for a robust work-out routine. Also, given that Beachbody's "go to market" model is based on "multi-level marketing", see ...


2

You could experience: lack of energy/motivation or general fatigue muscle/strength loss hormone imbalance/low testosterone There are two fixes which come to mind: decrease activity level (# of days of activity or # of hours per session) increase cals to around maintenance (+200 or -200 should be a good range) Personally #2 sounds like the more ...


2

The phrase is a marketing slogan. That said, it is based on the principal that if you do the same thing time and time again, your gains will plateau at some point. By varying what you are doing and targeting the muscles in different ways, it will take your body longer to "get used" to a particular routine/exercise which results in plateauing.


2

You could likely see greater improvements by moving your HIIT workout to before your long run, and by shortening your HIIT intervals. Moving the HIIT training to before the longer run will allow you to attack it with a greater intensity, which works well, as intensity is the key component of the HIIT strategy. A 50 minute run at 8.5mph is tiring for the ...


1

Work out harder but less often is likely to lead to improvement. HIIT takes a lot out of you; to be able to do it well - and you need to be able to do it well for it to help you out - you need to be well rested. If you are doing it every day, you can only work out "kindof hard", not really hard, and kindof hard isn't going to put enough training stress on ...


1

First off slow rep training is only one method of HIT. Standard HIT (since the 70's) uses a 6 sec rep which is a 2 second positive followed by a 4 second negative. Time under tension will range from 40 seconds up to 120 seconds depending on who you talk to or which muscle groups you are working. 40-70 seconds is typical for strength and hypertrophy whereas ...


1

The "HIT" you describe is a very specific kind of HIT, in that they're specifically advocating one set of as many repetitions as you can stand: Almost all high intensity training methods involve only performing one, all-out work set per exercise. That's contrary to the sports science definition of intensity in the context of lifting, which I've usually ...


1

I did about 500 per day combined with a restricted food intake over some period of time and lost about 25 pounds. Here is the deal. I went to prison & only had muscle&fitness mags & men's health to study. This was my formula I discovered that worked four me... 200lbs 6`0=over weight now 173 & nicely baring a cut/tone. Take your body ...


1

I would reiterate what some people have said about addressing your diet first before going gungho on exclusively burpees. I know for myself I used to run a couple miles every day (not super regularly but often enough I thought should have made a difference). Nothing really changed for me until I made dietary changes. In my experience the following holds ...


1

If you don't like spending a lot of time doing exercise, bodyweight is the wrong way to go about it. To make gains you need progressive overload, and the only way to get progressive overload with bodyweight exercises is to increase your reps or sets, and that's going to draw your exercise out. To get things done quickly, you need to lift heavy weights, as ...


1

Maybe there are other ways to do it, but when I do high intensity workouts, I work as hard as I can. I don't think there is any point to worrying about heart rate or being in some particular "zone." As for rest, only if you are so tired that you can't complete the next rep, take a very short rest (e.g., 2-3 breaths) and get back after it. If you rest longer, ...



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