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23

Tabata is a HIIT method and the process is very straightforward, from RossTraining.com: Tabata intervals consist of 20 seconds of maximum intensity exercise, followed by 10 seconds of rest. This cycle is repeated 8 times (for a total of 4 minutes)... you can apply this protocol to almost any exercise. A few popular examples include hitting a ...


12

Here's a link to the Library of Medicine article discussing the effectiveness. Yes, it's a form of HIIT, the basic idea is 8 - 20 second intervals followed by 10 seconds of rest. Is it effective? the studies performed have shown it to be and I can tell you from first hand experience that it's the most effective program I've used to build endurance and loss ...


10

What the author refers to as Burst Workouts most other people will call HIIT, or High Intensity Interval Training. The reason this is highly effective, compared to say slow-poking it on an elliptical for 60 minutes, is that it generates an "afterburn" effect that lasts up to 24h after your workout. Multiple studies shows this and a quick search on Google ...


9

After scouring the web for resources on the subject, I have come to the following conclusions: High intensity interval training ("HIIT") programs are typically defined by a 2:1 ratio of work to rest/recovery periods, with anywhere from 4 to 10 cycles of work/rest, for a total workout session between 4-15 minutes depending on its structure ([source]). An ...


7

I've seen you ask and answer questions, so I'm certain you have most of the theoretical answers you seek. Now, to make them realistic (aka broscience that's working for me). Don't eat when you are hungry. Eat when it's appropriate. Don't eat because you feel like it; eat because you don't want your body clinging to the fat you have. It's not just about ...


6

Found this research Which compared Endurance Training vs. HIIT showing that relative to the energy expended, HIIT was 9x as effective in reducing fat. (This isn't exactly the comparison I was looking for but it's a good start) But this other study contradicts that This study suggests that fat loss is a function of energy expended rather than ...


6

It might be fine if you worked up to that kind of training volume, but be careful of overtraining. Tabatas and other HIIT is supposed to be hard. I happened to stumble across this post from Robb Wolf just a short while before I saw your question. It's relevant. Training volume is one of those “U-shaped curves”.... Too little isn’t good and neither is ...


6

If you are training outdoors, when you train is largely dependant on the weather. For example, I'm from Dallas so in the summer I have to weigh lower temperatures and higher humidity in the morning versus higher temperations and lower humidity in the late afternoon/evening. In a more temperate climate, you may not have that issue. When I run sprints or a ...


5

Many will tell you the best time to do HIT is first thing in the morning on an empty stomach. The theory being that a lack of readily available carbohydrates will ‘force’ your body to burn fat. A secondary benefit is the metabolic boost that comes with HIT (or any exercise for that matter). Doing HIT in the morning means you’ll experience your ‘boost’ ...


5

The point of rest in Tabata protocol workouts isn't to let you fully recover, it's to let you recover a little in order to prolong the length of time you can sustain maximal effort without a dramatic decrease in output. There should never be a question of whether you pushed yourself hard enough during the work phase, because you should be exerting maximal ...


5

Hopefully, I can help you sort through some of the information. I think you have every right to be skeptical of the claims on the Stronglifts site, Medhi does tend to overstate things and not dig deep at all. However, broscience is still useful when actual science doesn't have any information on the subject. The good news is that there is still some ...


4

Strength training plus pool running You won't get a definitive answer to your question, because there are so many options that could possibly work for you, and here's one! Strength training (using a small set of full-body barbell exercises, like in Starting Strength, or Stronglifts 5x5) has been used by many people as an effective weight (fat) loss ...


4

I have a similar problem in that I have very low arches that are prone to injury from repeated stress. I have found that one of the absolute best exercises to utilize HIIT without foot strain is indoor rowing. the motion of rowing makes it ideal for intervals, and works the upperbody and core, as opposed to other low impact excercises like cycling. ...


4

Besides the answer from Moses, I would like to add: Ratio of work to rest. The 2:1 isn't typical for all sorts of HIIT. The Wikipedia article in the source also mentions the "Little method" where you have more of a 1:1 relationship. Personally, I have been exposed to "2 min run - 2 min rest"x10 or "15s run-15s rest" x10x2 protocols, depending on goals and ...


4

This is the single most exhausting training that you could take and yet it lasts so little. Regardless of the shape you are in, it's really hard. If you are in great shape, your sprint will be faster. If in mediocre shape, your sprint will be slower. But in general, if you push yourself, both types will be barely breathing at the end. :) I don't recommend ...


4

That's a very overarching question, but I'll do my best to answer it: First off, the activity you do does not matter that much if your goal is to lose fat weight. Although it does matter if you want to keep lean body mass (i.e. muscle weight), so let's dive a bit deeper into this. Basically, every diet is calories in vs. calories out. If you use up more ...


4

One of my other issues is my diet I believe. My TDEE is calculated to be 2439 calories/day, How do you know that? What source? which if you take off 20% makes it 1952. I eat below 1952 every day but don't see any weight loss and I think it's because my body is used to what I eat. I don't think it works that way. If you are not getting ...


4

I can see why this sounds confusing, but most runners record there training in miles or kilometres per week. So if you were to take 10-15% of your weeks running miles, I would think that's what it means. However, if your target is to improve your 10k, you may be better to do 10-15% high intensity running. Personally, I would think this will be more ...


4

You've acknowledged that it is a mental barrier you are facing. The most effective strategy here is going to be to break through it mentally. You say you "usually for some reason...just get off", well, in all honesty, my advice is simply to not get off. Recognize when you are approaching this point that there will be pressure from your body to stop, then ...


3

If you are in bad shape then your high intensity will be adequately lower that that of a trained person. Just use a stationary bike your risk of injury is basically zero. If you still have doubts about it then just stay under your perceived limit at the beginning and slowly work up towards it. I would say it's not necessary though. Keep in mind those ...


3

You can see examples of resistance HIIT workouts at least a couple of times a week on the CrossFit main site. Aside from the "strictly endurance" or "strictly strength" workouts, nearly all CrossFit workouts are HIIT workouts. For example, this Wednesday's workout: Five rounds for time of:   20 Strict ring dips   135 pound Thruster, 14 ...


3

If you can go harder by "running" rather than "jumping" then you should do that. Anything that you can do for 1 to 2 minutes isn't "all out". You need to find a way to go all-out, 100%, in that 25 seconds. Messing with the edges of the protocol--5 seconds less rest or more work effort--isn't going to solve this central issue. Increase or decrease the ...


3

First of all, there is no wrong time in doing HIIT training. But if you want to do it in the morning, you have to mind some important aspects. DON'T do HIIT on a empty stomach in the morning and right after waking up. Let your body wake up for 30 Minutes, and take a Proteinshake or a small breakfast an hour or an half hour before workout. If you don't eat, ...


3

HIIT stands for High Intensity Interval Training. The "interval" portion suggests short duration intervals followed by rest intervals. The "High Intensity" portion does suggest that you give a maximal effort during that short interval. However, for this technique to be effective you must include the short rest intervals to allow for recovery so that you ...


3

Do you own a smartphone/tablet? If it's available then get yourself an app for Tabata/HIIT. I personally use „Bodyweight Training by Mark Lauren“ (also available as book), which is progressive, customizeable and has a ton of exercises (and video descriptions for the iPad). A timer for tabata and a sample HIIT workout is also built-in. I think you get the ...


3

Per a 5/3/1 article by Jim Wendler on T-Nation, you're supposed to have supplemental cardio two or three times a week: The Triumvirate uses three exercises per workout, one of which is a core lift. Before each workout, do a warm-up that includes mobility, flexibility, something to raise your core temperature and heart rate (like rope jumping), and foam ...


2

Several things can affect the size and makeup of your muscles: What you eat. Eating carbs post workout can help increase the size of the muscles for a time. Also, more fat in your muscle tissue adds to the bulk. If you burn that fat, the muscle appears to shrink even though the strength is unaffected. How you train. Long endurance work makes muscles ...


2

The two previous answers detail two DIFFERENT workout protocols. Answer # 1 details HIIT, which is High Intensity Interval Training and as answer # 1 suggests the "interval" is necessary for this to be considered HIIT. To achieve HIIT, train 90 - 100% of your maximum capacity (not your MHR which is really only a guideline and does NOT necessarily measure ...


2

"Burst" workouts, or high intensity interval training, can't be better than cardio. They are cardio! They're just stop-and-go or do-this-do-that-rest-do-this-again or do-this-now-faster-now-slow-down-now-faster-again cardio instead of "steady state" do-this-one-thing-at-a-constant-speed cardio. Interval cardio is definitely efficient for improving ...



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