Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Whether or not it is necessary to wait an hour depends on you, actually. Some people can drink a lot and go run, some people can't. However, unless you are chronically dehydrated or exercising in extreme weather conditions, you won't need water for most of your runs. You should be getting most of your hydration from your diet during the course of the day, ...


12

Unless you're running in extreme heat conditions, for 30 minutes to an hour you really don't need any on course hydration. Drink some water beforehand, and afterwards to replenish sweat loss, and you should be fine. I've run up to 2 hours without on course hydration in moderate conditions. There is some evidence that even 2% dehydration can start to cause ...


8

Answer for When are electrolyte/sports drinks necessary? It seems to me that you're basically asking 2 questions: Under what circumstances do most people need to drink sports drinks to recharge their electrolytes? When drinking large amount of water (it sounds like you drink up to 3 gallons per day), does a person need to make a special effort to ...


8

I wouldn't worry about reducing my water intake during a run in hot weather. Just because your fellow runners don't drink anything doesn't mean it is a good idea for you (or them). Particularly under the conditions you are describing I would recommend you keep drinking water. It will help you perform better. As to the weight loss during the run: are you ...


7

Joshua Carmody's answer is pretty good but I'd like to add an ultrarunner's perspective. Proper hydration and nutrition are one of the keys to completing a race, and completing one fast, so we're fairly knowledgeable about what works. The amount that Haphazard is drinking appears to be enormous to my eyes. However, as long as they are drinking for thirst ...


6

Not all sugars are the same. Glucose is a monosaccharide, and is easily utilized by nearly all cells of the body for energy. Fructose, also a monosaccharide, is not: it is almost exclusively metabolized by the liver. Excess consumption of fructose causes a variety of problems that would not occur with glucose consumption. Sucrose ("table sugar" or "cane ...


4

I've reduced my water consumption during bike races to a minimum, see my question about this. I try not to drink anything within the first hour of activity, depending on the temperature this time varies, of course. While running is a bit different from biking I think it isn't absolutely necessary to carry something to drink while running, if you are unsure, ...


4

Well, hydration relies on some basic principles: Drink a bit of water, all the time (not at specific times) Under physical activity, increase frequency Use mild temperature water (20-22ºC is the recommended tmp. if I'm not mistaken) (cold water refreshes but does not hydrate, mild water hydrates but does not refresh) Include non-dry fruits & vegetables ...


4

Let me start by saying that no amount of water will keep the doctor away. There're still many things that can go wrong. The 8 glasses of water is not backed up by any meaningful scientific evidence, it's just a rule of thumb. But it includes water from all sources including food. Making genral recommendations about things like fluid intake is bad idea as it ...


4

Water's water. As long as it is water and does not contain known poisons like pathogens or heavy metals then you'll be fine. You don't need much Mg for proper function. The well respected authority on the sceince of running, Dr Tim Noakes, is quoted as saying: Magnesium is another intracellular ion that, like potassium, is lost in sweat and urine ...


4

Your caffeine consumption, practically speaking, probably does not affect your workouts positively or negatively. As @JohnP pointed out, caffeine studies are on greater amounts than a couple of cans of tea per day. According to the Sports Med. 2001;31(11):785-807, "ingestion of caffeine as coffee appears to be ineffective compared to doping with pure ...


4

At this point, recommending anything specific is just as likely to cause bad effects as it is good. By this I mean that you have no time to test during a race type workout that a drink with additives (Such as electrolytes, calories) won't give you an upset stomach or similar. By now you should have been on several training rides of at least the same ...


4

Why would you want to cut your water intake? The sweating is your body attempting to shed heat and cool itself. If you deliberately cut your water intake, you are short circuiting your cooling efforts. Also, you are not only losing water weight. You are also using up glycogen, which has a weight to it. An hour run is long enough you will see a significant ...


4

Hydration is paramount with any form of exercise. Hydration is a necessary component of all metabolic processes. This includes building muscle. However, hydration is also a bit more than just drinking water. Proper hydration requires that you keep your electrolytes in balance. Electrolyte imbalance is more critical in endurance training than ...


3

Water intake should mainly be used to stave off dehydration, which can happen as early as a 1.5% body weight loss. Depending on how much/quickly you sweat, the time for this to happen can take a short period of time or a long one. Most likely, with exercise under an hour long, you're not going to lose that much water. If you want to see if you're hitting ...


3

Your questions suggest to me that you have not done major distance on an elliptical machine (or the road) before. Therefore, I strongly recommend that you treat this like a road marathon and follow all the normal advice for that e.g. if you can do 10km now then a 4 month programme will have you in shape to complete this. Clothing, nutrition and hydration: ...


3

For everything less than 15 km, you really don't need any special preparations compared to a normal training run of the same length. Neither for the day before, the hours just before the run nor during the run itself. If the run is in the morning, I usually try to avoid anything excessive spicy or greasy the evening before - this is just to make sure I don't ...


3

Nathan makes some amazing hydration products that are specialized for distance running. I found the Minimist to be the best of their camleback-like products. It only weight 6.5 oz when dry, holds 50oz of liquid and has enough pockets for fuel for a 4 hour run. The cavity that holds the bladder is a bit bigger than the bladder and you can use that space to ...


2

I've seen camelbak-type packs (like this one), bottleholders of various types (usually hand/arm holder or belt, like the one @michael linked to), or even runners carrying plastic water bottles by hand. Possibly the most comfortable solution is not to carry water, but to have someone else carry it for you - hydration stations at marathons come to mind. The ...


2

I would just get a smaller camelbak. Honestly, people drink more than they need. If you're running efficiently, you don't need that much hydration. If I'm running a marathon, I'll skip by most of the hydration stations, I don't think more than 500ml is really necessary (maybe 1L if you're larger and a profuse sweater).


2

I want to say just ditch the camelbak and and one of the bottles and limit yourself to 700mL, but maybe your body actually needs more water. More likely though, you're just drinking more than you need (most people drink a lot more than they really need, thanks to Gatorade/Powerade marketing), so try exerting self control, and see if you can have yourself ...


2

I would eat and drink normally the day before the race and the day of the race. Do exactly what you've done during training. If you need to stop eating a certain time before training then stop eating at the same time before the race. A 5km is not going to dehydrate you. It's basically just a really long sprint.


2

This recent post on Science Based Running is relevant. The above answer is exhaustive, but the article covers some of the same ground with information from Tim Noake's The Art of Running. The author of the post also provides a brief analysis of some popular sport drinks.


2

To add to the two previous answers alerady... Hydration as a WHOLE needs to be addressed more so than the hydration one understakes right before running. One should be adaquately hydrated in general. You do dehydrate as you sleep though through breathing (especially in the winter when the air can be dry) and sweat. You could also drink a less amount of ...


2

I don't mean this so much as a definitive answer so much an anecdotal one. A few years ago I discovered that my morning run times were measurably better, and I FELT much better, if I drank a whole liter of water right before bed. I continue to do this when I plan on running the following morning.


2

When the human body goes from laying prone to standing up there is a rapid, and brief, change in blood pressure. This is the likely cause. Some people are more susceptible than others, and it's called orthostatic hypotension, or sometimes, "vertigo." “He's Dizzy when he Stands Up.” An Introduction to Initial orthostatic Hypotension Orthostatic hypotension ...


2

It is not exactly clear what your intentions are. If you drink tons of water your kidneys are not happy. You will have many bio-breaks ;) In case of (muscle) workouts you can increase the amount of water in your muscles by using creatine. If your intention is only to drink enough water before a training session you could eat vegetables/fruits with a high ...


1

It is impossible to say what and how much "is enough" without more detailed information. But in general, if you are exercising at an intensity where you are sweating, then failure to replenish will definitely impact your performance. Coconut water is well studied and one of the most natural hydration substances available. I just wanted to mention it ...


1

You need to factor in what keeps your body hydrated before breaking a sweat. If you've heard the term "Electrolytes", it is simply a blood mineral made up of sodium, potassium, chloride, etc. In order to be replenished before and after cardio activity, your body needs to have high enough levels so that it can function. For instance, if I'm breaking a sweat, ...


1

Congratulations! I am doing the same thing although I am starting with a half marathon. I am new to running for long periods of time. I made sure I had a good base running of 30 minutes four days per week before I started the training for the half. I then picked a half 12 week training program for a half marathon that slowly increases by distance each ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible