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14

If you are looking to build mass, you should rest 45-60 seconds between sets of 8-12 repetitions for optimal gains. This timing builds optimal muscle mass and hypertrophy. If instead you are looking to improve your strength or endurance, you should be looking at a 3-4 minute break between sets. You'll want 4-6 repetitions with heavier resistance for ...


11

You can gain muscle while losing weight, but really only in specific circumstances, which you most likely don't fall into. You need to be fairly obese to start with, and eating the correct nutrients to support the lifting that you are doing. However, you are most likely not in that category, since you have been training regularly already. If you are in a ...


11

If you want size, you don't want to rest very long - perhaps under a minute between sets. Your goal in the gym is to get your muscles as fatigued as possible as quickly as possible (and then go home to eat!) I'm currently doing a hybrid workout to gain size (but I still want to work on strength a little, which is generally my long-term goal) and my workout ...


7

Myofibrillar and Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy do not lend themselves to being a black and white "it's either one or the other" result. Depending on your initial muscle mass levels, you may put on mass which will be sustained simply because it's muscle you should have had to begin with. In that case, putting on mass would not mean it's sarcoplasmic. Nor does ...


7

Many lifters, particularly novices, need to focus at least some of their attention on hypertrophy and mass gain in order to have a sufficient muscle mass to make strong. I'm not sure if it's appropriate for intermediates and beyond. I'm also not sure if this would call for a sarcoplasmic hypertrophy phase (in which I imagine one would focus on 10-12 rep ...


6

Question 1: Does hypertrophy training assist for a greater eventual neural output? Hypertrophy training probably does not help to increase neural drive. That is because of the anatomical properties of the muscles. Muscle fibers are innervated in groups, called motor units, by a single motor neuron (above figure shows a single motor unit). By doing ...


5

Firstly, somatotypes are completely bogus. The idea of ectomorphs, mesomorphs and endomorphs was originally used for psychology not fitness. If you aren't gaining weight like you want, you are not eating enough - it is as simple as that. Advice for gaining weight is exactly the same as advice for losing it - measure everything you eat and weigh yourself at ...


5

Creatine increases the high energy phosphate diffusion between the mitochondria and myosine heads. Furthermore it works as a buffer for pH changes, which can improve cellulair homeostasis. And a decreased PCr level stimulates phosphofructokinase, an enzyme which limits glycolysis, and thus replenishment of this will lead to an improved glycolysis which also ...


4

A bigger muscle does not necessarily mean a stronger muscle. There are two concepts centered around hypertropy. Training for hypertrophy(sarcoplasmic), and the hypertrophy that naturally happens when you lift. Sarcoplasmic and Myofibrillar hypertrophy are not mutually exclusive. When you train for power you will have a little Sacroplasmic and when you train ...


4

I run. Half marathons, 5ks 10k, and trail runs. building legs muscles are a lot like building other muscles. You can develop slow twitch and fast twitch muscle fibers. For running you are going to need both. The short answer is your legs muscles are going to take on your own unique genetic shape. Simple answer, keep up the endurance and run on flat surfaces ...


4

Interesting question. Personally, I don't think that neural training would specifically help with hypertrophy training, except in a general sense, which I'll explain. You can train neural pathways to the point where they approach the speed of a reflex. I'd have to dig up the studies, but they tested reflex transmission time against transmission times for ...


3

They are both correct, however, the way they are stated is the source of confusion. 1) There is no correlation between the number of fibers and the energy system used. There is actually an exogenous explanation. The increased recruitment of muscle fibers occurs due to an increase in tension of the muscle. I.e. the force production is increased. When you are ...


3

HIIT has a positive impact on cholesterol, the full text is at NIH.gov study. The abstract, with some sections highlighted is below: This study examined the impact of an 8-week program of high-intensity interval training on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and the atherogenic index (TC/HDL-C) in 36 untrained men ages ...


3

YES, both muscle size and strength need to be maintained. However, you need to provide much less stimulus to maintain said size/strength gains than you needed to grow them initially. E.g. going from a 5x5 protocol to a 3x10 or vice-versa shouldn't see any kind of strength or size loss, so long as you're keeping the same intensity and eating properly. That ...


3

Myosatellite cells are basically inactive structures that are found in mature muscle cells. Depending on the stimulus, they can develop into different things in the muscle. As I understand it, they have a couple of functions. They can increase the number of nuclei, create new muscle fiber or spawn off daughter cells. The increase in muscle fiber content is ...


3

I'll try to stay tight to your "science" and "evidence" clauses, because there's a whole lot of non-science reasons to use free weights. (Just off the top of my head, there's cost, versatility, compactness, and portability.) This roundtable discussion (PDF), with copious references, is one of my favorite sources for the machines/free-weights science. Among ...


3

In general, runners tend to have more slender, leaner looking legs than other athletes. This is because low weight, high repetition exercising such as distance running (pretty much anything other than sprints, so anything above 400 meters, really) does not really lend itself to building bulky muscle, and is in fact counterproductive because of the extra ...


2

It will increase it indirectly. Creatine draws more water and nutrients to muscle, so if your nutrition is good, more protein will come to muscle and build into it. Also creatine gives more power and improves recovery time, so again, it indirectly helps our muscle grow by helping us with our gym training without witch there is no muscle growth.


2

In terms of stretching the biggest risk isn't the muscle, but the connective tissue (ligaments and tendons). Overstretching that hurts the tendons will produce tendinitis, same as lifting heavy weights with improper form. However, you are correct in that some forms of stretching will affect muscle size and adaptation. Certain forms of dynamic stretching, ...


2

Geek, The correct technique for seated row is pretty simple. http://www.getfitchimp.com/exercise/seated-cable-row Keep your knees slightly bent to reduce stress on your knee joints Do not hump your upper back as this will increase stress on your shoulder joints Do not hyperextend your lower back when you finish as this may put more stress on your lower ...


2

I'm going to start off with that there is no universally best routine. Only what is most appropriate for you given your level of training, physical development, and your goals. Advice in the world of bodybuilding (i.e. hypertrophy work), opinions are so severely divided that it's even hard to compile a list of routines. That's probably due to the fact a ...


1

To an extent. As long as you're progressing in volume it would be hard for you to lose mass when going back to low rep/heavy weight training. I enjoy doing both. So for instance training 5x5 on a monday. Doing high rep work on a wed and then heavy weight, low rep on friday.


1

The best routines for natural lifters are 5x5 routines for the most part. Stronglifts, starting strength and bill starr routines all stand out above the rest for achieving maximal results in the shortest time. If you are a natural lifter make sure to stay away from body part splits, these are useless in my opinion. As for gaining size a caloric surplus is ...


1

Cellular oedema would reverse rather quickly after exercise. As far as pump goes, there is one simple explanation, and one complicated one. Cellular oedema due to an influx of Na and H2O probably contribute, but not as much. The simple one is that while exercising, there is local hypoxia and hypertension. This causes the vascular resistance to decrease, ...


1

Generally, it's possible to get stronger without building muscle once you reach a certain point. The problem is, to reach that point, you'd probably still build muscle and get bigger. Also, please view this answer as a theoretical rambling instead of a recommended course of action. Theoretical ramblings: First off, you don't need to gain size to gain ...


1

Front Lever progressions have really help me to really isolate my lats and make them grow. My progressions initially was to be able to hang on to a pull-up bar for at least a minute without feeling too much muscle fatigue (which i had a lot before). Then I'd start with tucked front levers, progress to straddle front levers, then single leg front levers and ...


1

It's genetic mostly. Hypertrophy is not only caused by high intensity and low reps. If you do any exercise long enough this will lead to hypertrophy to some extent (the extent is genetic and proportional to the stimulus you are applying). Those skinny elite distance runners you see that run 100+ miles a week, that's genetic. Their body simply doesn't want ...


1

Pump-style training (if one knows what they are doing) usually aims to train through fatigue and force enough blood into the muscle so that the muscle facia is stretched. I see many guys in the gym over the years that only do this kind of training. They do it month after month, year after year, because it feels good and they look good in the mirror - while ...


1

Absolutely. First, why WON'T it happen? Aerobic activity following Strength training impedes the mTor pathway. What the heck does that mean? It means if you lift and then run, the hormones responsible for hypertrophy will be inhibited and prevent mass gain. When strength training, rest periods greater than 3 minutes allow the ADP-CP system to refill ...



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