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1

Is 6 days better? Yes. You can bring more energy to each workout and get the same work done to higher quality which leads to better progress. Also you have more room for variation to keep you progressing. But you need to lay out the routine correctly. There are no black and white answers. Can you give an example of the routines? Ideas for setting it up ...


2

When you look at building more lean muscle mass you must remember the fundamental rules of hypertrophy, which I feel is sometimes forgotten among everything else going on within your training program. There are 3 really key fundamentals which all go towards building muscle: Increased Tension To illicit a hypertrophic response you need to stimulate the ...


5

The first routine is low on overall weekly volume in terms of sessions in the gym and I would recommend if you chose this route to achieve hypertrophy what you understand that as you develop into a intermediate/advanced lifter that the time you spend in the gym during these 3 session will increase to a significant amount. Whole-body programs are designed to ...


3

Psychological issues aside (as requested), there is the big, BIG issue of physiological restitution. You've probably heard of the muscle group rest period of 48-hours since both your layouts seem to follow it. But your central nervous system (CNS) is going to be taking a hit 6 days in a row if you follow the second routine. While your muscles may be ...


-4

I do a full-body, two-hour workout twice a week. I progress at a normal rate. With that said, I can lose about two to three pounds of fat a month (roughly 240 to 360 calories loss a day). It's not much, I know, but it's better than nothing. All you need is 1 gram of protein per lean body weight, and just enough carbs for workout days to get you through. ...


0

Great question. Before you can understand the answer, you need to understand some of the principles involved in how "tempo" relates to performance. Performance relating to either hypertrophy and endurance or power/strength. It is generally well known and accepted that to invoke proper hypertrophy, you need to introduce enough stimulus to the muscle to ...


2

Time-under-Tension is when you are moving, holding and otherwise doing work to keep the weight in a particular position. Think of doing a slow bodyweight squat, this will get hard if you repeat it because your muscles are under a constant strain, building up lactic acid and creating a few micro-tears. This principle is why doing a plank works out your abs, ...


1

Specific tempo advice for maximizing strength, power, hypertrophy and endurance will depend on: Your exercise of choice (sqauts for example require a much greater recovery time than curls) Your level of training (beginners and those who have been lifting for many years recover at very different speeds) Generally, I will say that strength and power ...



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