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12

No, you should not exercise with with temporary illness such as a chest cold, flu, or fever. A runny nose or sore throat shouldn't prevent your exercise routine though. Once you have an infection or illness that effects your cardiovascular or digestive system, you should sit it out and let your body have the time needed to heal itself. People with chronic ...


10

No, keep resting would be the commonest medical answer for this (acute bronchitus). My view is: given all the hours of training you've put in, it's better to complete the marathon slightly slower than to escalate the condition in the cold air and not complete it at all.


5

Definitely rest. The importance of resting during the last weeks before a marathon is already hugely underrated. You also risk more serious problems for just a couple of days off. Rest! A few very easy miles should be ok (they may even help) but nothing more until you feel you are ok. You still have enough time to catch up (maybe throw in some intense ...


4

First, understand that stress in any form depresses your immune system. Lifting weights is a training stress, and in particular deadlifts can really push you over the edge. The goal is that when the stress is lifted and you recover you are at a stronger position. I have no idea what your current stats are with the squat, bench, deadlift, overhead press, ...


3

You have to be careful with running and hydration and having a cold a lack of water can exacerbate your cold. Also, if your body is still fighting the virus you need sufficient amount of rest. So if running is going to make you feel exhausted this is a sign that your body still needs more rest. That being said, if I am on the mend I prefer to do regular ...


3

I often hear the advice that if the symptoms are only from the neck up (ie stuffy nose) it's OK, if neck downwards (aches and pains) you shouldn't exercise. I usually sit it out if I feel any way under the weather. When I don't feel my best I just get frustrated and this has further detrimental effect.


3

First let's start off with the answer for this specific scenario: Being only 1 month into the program, it is unlikely that you are at a significant enough weight that would warrant a deload. Additionally, with only 1 week of missed workouts, it is unlikely you have had a significant enough deterioration in strength to warrant a deload. Given this, unless ...


3

Your doctor is closer to being right (but probably not 100%). The body starts eating muscle when you're out of glycogen. If you're drinking sugary beverages (i.e., not diet) that will delay the onset of chowing down on muscles, at least to some extent. You'll become marginally de-conditioned after five days, but not radically; most of the issues will be ...


2

Muscle "pump" is nothing more than increased blood flow into a muscle from exertion. If you have a higher pump sensation than usual, then I'd look at something else as the cause. More caffeine or salt than usual, dehydration, other factors that would contribute to this.


2

You aren't telling us about your diet or sleep schedule. Both these factors are important when considering illness. [This part should be a comment, but I can't comment yet] Answer: If it is directly related to going to the gym you might want to make sure you are washing your hands thoroughly after a gym session. The gym is a great place for germs to spread. ...


1

It sounds like your in a tough situation with doctors, so I'll suggest some options, but keep in mind that if you get the chance to see another doctor you should do so. I've never suffered from anxiety attacks, but I do have exercise induced asthma, and before my diagnosis had some pretty scary situations where I couldn't breathe. For me, the best response ...


1

Hi Iain, Do you take multi-vitamins? If not, you need to add multi-vitamins to your daily intake. Vitamin C is especially needed for immune system boost. Since you've already sought medical help and nothing obvious could be found, I would start with taking the multi-vitamins. Our bodies can't produce all the nutrients it needs; that's why ...


1

The approach has to be in the following order: Figure out what went wrong. What you experienced is not normal. It could be anything from bad dehydration to a latent neurological or cardiovascular problem. It might even be dietary or simply a really bad flu. You'll be working with your doctor on this. I presume you are writing your question some days ...


1

First and foremost consult with your doctor about taking on a fitness regimine - never sacrifice your health. That being said, fitness is an important part of health and can often help speed recovery, if your doctor thinks it is safe to do so. Assuming you are ready and able, the key is to start somewhere and listen to you body. If you can't run 5 miles, ...



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