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According to Dr Stuart McGill, twisting your spine is generally safe without a load, not safe with a load (discussed around 20:00 here). However, things may be different for people with bad backs: For example, flexion-intolerant backs are very common. Stretches such as pulling the knees to the chest may give the perception of relief (via stimulation of ...


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"Listen" to your body. If you feel pain during exercise (not one of lactic buildup in muscles), with or without injuries, it's best to immediately stop. Make sure you are doing the exercise properly and that you don't have an underlying condition that limits your ability to perform the exercise safely. That being said, I'm occasionally doing twists, ...


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For compression specifically - in my experience, it's often quite the contrary. Wearing compression sleeves, braces and especially belts all the time, leads to certain muscles staying relaxed or more strained in compound exercises when they shouldn't be. Your nervous system learns how to activate (also under-activate and over-activate) muscles based on ...


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I'm not a doctor but I'm theorizing a little here. Your hands don't need much blood when you're running - thus you're body is taking blood from them and sending them where it's needed (i.e. your breathing muscles and your legs). That could explain the cold hands. I'd probably just wear some gloves for a while until your body adapts. The sugar-craving and ...


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It would depend on the grip and the width of that grip on the swiss bar. The suprispinatus abducts the upper arm (Moves it away from the torso), so if you do a swiss bar with a wide grip, you are still going to need to move the upper arm out to accommodate. The primary thing the swiss bar would achieve is rotation of the grip (And thus the forearm), which ...



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