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8

It very much depends on what is causing the pain or discomfort. First of all, if you are worried, see a doctor or physiotherapist, they will be better able to diagnsoe the problem. As for substituting a deadlift, its not really possible as its a complex compound exercise that involves a lot of muscles. However, if you can move smaller weights relatively ...


6

If the pain is in the joint, it is likely to be an inflammation based problem known as tendinitis. Tendinitis happens when you have bad form, inadequate warmup, poor equipment, and/or unbalanced work. There is likely some swelling, even if it's not visible on the surface. For the most immediate relief, the protocol I use is: Compress the joint--should ...


5

If your doctor has recommended not running for a month, I would suggest not running for a month. Sure you can exercise now, but it will probably lengthen your recovery time and potentially aggravate your injury further. When in doubt, a doctor who has assessed you the internet. If you want a second opinion, try another doctor or a physiotherapist, but I ...


4

In some cases, strains come from muscle imbalances or weakness, and in other case they can be related to technique. In either case, when you do strain a muscle the following protocol works well: Rest. When it is no longer causing a lot of pain, you can start on the rehab. Compression and light work. It's better to do a lot of volume with low weight to ...


4

BackInShapeBuddy has given you some great tips. Here is my advice in addition to scientific evidence to prevent recurrent muscle strains: You will need to start performing dynamic warm-up. In addition, I strongly recommend you to perform 2 sets of 10 reps of burpee push-ups before any chest exercises from now on. You will also need to start training ...


4

Ask yourself this question: What's the likelihood of re-injuring the finger? The finger will take as long as it takes to get better, and running isn't going to change that significantly enough to worry about it if at all. As long as there is a low likelihood that you are going to hurt the finger again doing any activity, there is no reason to avoid ...


4

I think the most versatile shoulder exercise is the handstand push-up (HSPU) or a variation of it. The benefit of this movement is that no equipment is required. I understand that as a personal trainer, your clientele may not have the ability to perform this exercise, so there are quite a few options for scaling based on the fitness level of the trainee. ...


3

DOMS is an inflammatory reaction due to eccentric overload and structural alteration (ref). DOMS is distinct from an acute strain. It can be treated symptomatically as an inflammatory process (ibuprofen, cold, massage). It's also been observed that high-speed, rapid concentric muscular contractions may provide relief (same ref). Anecdotally, I support this ...


3

Finger injuries from climbing often involve strains of the tendon and/or tendon pulley, inflamation, partial or full tears and/or joint ligament sprains. You would need to see a doctor for a diagnosis, preferably a hand specialist with experience treating climbers. If you need treatment, look for a specialized hand therapist (either a physical or ...


3

I'm going to caveat this answer by informing you I am not a physical therapist. The routine I'm linking to is from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: Rotator Cuff Shoulder Conditioning Program. Some high points are: The rotator cuff needs to heal. If your client has pain dealing with any of the exercises outlined, don't do them. Strengthening ...


3

Injury sucks and it can never heal quick enough. To let it heal completely, you will need to have patience, though. First of all - and yes, I'm being preachy, bear with me - see a specialist. A trip to your physician is never really wasted time, even if he just tells you to slow down. In the worst case scenario you're really hurt and doing nothing can lead ...


2

I could do a front lever when I was 20-22 years old. Haven't tried but I don't think I have a chance now. I find that it is a tendon/balancing exercise. One of the great things about it is that it really picks on your least acclimated body part. It shows you where you need to work. Practicing Get a partner who will take some body weight off of you ...


2

Based on my own experiences, I can only say that the shock wave therapy did help on the pain in my feet from PF, but not enough to help me start running again. The later took 9 months and a very slow start-up after that. Now - two years later - I run 40+ km/week and participate in all the half-marathons I can find the time for... I still tape my feet (the ...


2

One of the problems with competitive or repetitive sports on the growing body is that they can cause the body to grow with asymmetries. Young athletes who do not have knowledgeable enough trainers are likely to develop problems over time with muscles, fascia and joints as uneven strains are created. Now you are left with figuring out how to correct the ...


2

I ran long distances for two years in minimalist shoes, and have just now realized that yes, minimalist shoes are great for improving your form and reducing injury, but they still mask just enough of your senses to make it harder to perfect your form—specifically, running efficiently with as little impact as possible. Also, minimalist shoes need to fit quite ...


2

There's no universal cap on barefoot running. People do ultramarathons barefoot, and marathons that are entirely on asphalt. But pretty much any source on barefoot/minimalist running advice is going to tell you to ease into it to build up the strength in your feet. If doing more than 10k causes you pain, listen to your body and keep it to shorter runs for ...


2

In general, good PTs tend to distinguish between two kinds of people. Some clients will be extremely sensitive to pain. These folks will, in general, benefit from being told to exercise even when it hurts a bit, as it will prevent muscle loss &c. Other clients will be significantly less sensitive to pain (case in point, I once finished a 10mi ...


2

Step 1: consult a doctor to determine: If it's really hemorrhoids The severity if it is And the protocol to remedy it. If the hemorrhoid was caused by lifting, then know it won't get any better if you continue lifting the way you do. You can work through minor hemorrhoids, but refine your technique. Step 2: fix your form You'll find that you need to ...


1

Why do you want to "train shoulders"? Are your clients bodybuilding? If they're doing movements that involve the shoulders, e.g.: push-ups (with hands on a chair or stool if regular push-ups are too hard) pull-ups (with assistance if necessary), and dips ...then why the need to hit yet another deltoid? Unless they're bodybuilding clients (in which case I ...


1

You should always train them together. Naturally most people have a muscle imbalance, right arm stronger than left arm is a common one but as long as you train them together they'll eventually even out even if physical appearance may be slightly different. Just because you don't feel as though you've pushed to the limit doesn’t mean you haven’t made an ...


1

You should distinguish between pain in fact of sore muscles due long workout or real injuries (in my experience most time you can make a difference) running injured is a bad idea. But it sounds like you need to know whats going on with your body for real. I would advise you to contact a Osteopath, its an advanced kind of physiotherapy and they have deep ...


1

Your biceps like to provide assistance when performing exercises for the back, however if you use a pronated grip (or overhand grip)to do your back exercises it puts the biceps in a weaker position to help out. This forces the brachioradialis muscle, to pick up the slack and aid in assisting the bigger muscle group working. The brachioradialis muscle is ...


1

Your hamstrings are connected to your lower back muscles. Many times tight hamstrings can cause lower back pain because they force the lower back muscles to stretch. The answer isn't to stretch the hamstrings before - that can cause more harm than good. Stretching after you are hurt doesn't help either. The key is to wait for after the recovery and ...


1

I do not agree with strapping your ankles unless you are battling through an injury and the bracing is critical to you being able to perform/play. I really really oppose any young athlete to wearing hi-tops, braces, or anything else that hinders ankle movement. First and foremost you are debilitating the strengthening of that region of your body. The ...


1

Dynamic Warm Up - You mention stretching before workouts. Consider a dynamic warm-up rather than static stretching. Physical Therapy - Also, since you have repeated strains, you may need some physical therapy to improve postural alignments and soft tissue restrictions. They will evaluate where you are tight and where you are weak and give you specific ...


1

I've cracked ribs four times. The amount of time that it takes for the bones to knit does not depend on whether you are taking painkillers or not; it takes about 6 weeks either way (for me, at least). Advice from my physician with cracked ribs (broken ribs are different) is "you can do whatever you can tolerate. Try to breathe deeply a few times an hour ...


1

Grant Grimes is the only person who I've seen discuss on the internet how to integrate the front lever into generalized training. His program has been posted many places across the net (for instance), but here's one excerpt that may have you: I did gymnastics movements first because I viewed them as a skill I wanted to improve. If you just want them for ...


1

Here are some replacement exercises, however, as stated above, it can not be replaced entirely due to the complexity of the exercise itself. Lat Pulldowns (compound, overhand grip) Pull-Ups (compound, weighted, overhand grip) Bent Over Barbell Rows (compound) Seated Cable Rows (compound) One-arm Dumbbell Rows (compound) Pullover Machine Kneeling Cable ...


1

For what it's worth, I've been a minimalist runner (mostly in Vibrams) for the past few years. At first, there was a lot of pain as my feet and "spring" built strength, then things settled down. I did notice that as I slowly increased the mileage, I would often hit a wall and flirt with some pain like you describe (sometime underneath in the plantar ...


1

You might find this post in T-nation very interesting. A summary: a study with runners suffering from an Achilles tendon injury, healed very well by performing eccentric exercises, aka negative phases. Eccentric exercises seem to be very useful for healing tendonitis, in several studies. More details in this answer Additionally, you may find useful to ...



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