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7

The nature of those two movements is different. The lorry driver performs continous, non-changing movements which wear out the cartilage of the joints and the tendons and ligaments. Every movement induces slight inflammation in the structures involved. One difference is that the lorry driver performs the same movement every day, without the possibility of ...


4

Muscle strains can be tricky to heal, mostly because people won't take the proper amount of time to let them heal properly. Given a full healing cycle, then you shouldn't have any more risk of reinjuring the bicep than any other muscle in the body. You note that the pain is in the center of the bicep, which almost precludes any tendon involvement, so it's ...


4

Not much you can do. If you are restricted enough that you can't run, and can't even lean on the bars (Much less get into aero position), its going to be just trying to keep in the best shape you can. What I would honestly do (Especially considering swim is your weakest point), is do the trainer for now. Sign up for Trainerroad, or get some of the ...


3

Granted, this is somewhat opinion based, but, I can relate to your situation, although, in a slightly more serious vein. I was a competitive bodybuilder for many years. Initially, I was diagnosed with a herniated disc, but, later diagnosed with a slightly more serious condition that ultimately required surgical intervention by a neurosurgeon. So, for your ...


3

I would look into pilates. There are a lot of great free work outs on youtube that would be helpful for you with an injured knee. you could try POPpilates, she has a lot of free work outs on youtube. Or you can try Nike training club. its a free app in the itunes store. Very similar to insanity or p90x. but you can break it down into areas to work. You could ...


3

What lifts shouldn't you do when suffering a muscle tear, cartilage tear, soft tissue damage, hard tissue damage or broken bone? Well, until your doctor says otherwise, I'd stay away from: Deadlifts Squats Bench press Overhead press Bicep curls Tricep curls Quadricep curls The frequently unheard of Quinrecp, Hexacep and Septecep curls Running, jogging, ...


3

Tonny, Sorry about the shoulder injury. There are minor alternatives to planks; however, they all involve shoulder usage. In my opinion, if you cannot perform plank (an exercise that requires no movement) due to shoulder issues, no other single exercise exists as a substitute. This source highlights some exercises that can be done to replace planks; ...


3

Injury sucks and it can never heal quick enough. To let it heal completely, you will need to have patience, though. First of all - and yes, I'm being preachy, bear with me - see a specialist. A trip to your physician is never really wasted time, even if he just tells you to slow down. In the worst case scenario you're really hurt and doing nothing can lead ...


3

First of all, if your fingers are constantly under stress and they are not recovering properly, this can lead to nerve damage in the wrist and elbow which is known as a repetitive stress injury. Much of your 'finger' strength in rock-climbing and tennis is generated by your forearm. So increasing forearm strength will increase the strength of your fingers. ...


3

I herniated a disc ten years ago and it changed my life. In the long run for the better. I was 6'4 250 lbs with a bodyfat percentage well north of 20%. I was not healthy. I was playing a lot of baseball and the combination of the excess pressure on my midsection from being overweight and the wear and tear from excess rotation (swinging) was something my ...


3

The best I could find was a 2005 study which focused on older adults. They haven't identified the actual components causing the associations, but the relationship is there: Thus, the data are consistent with the notion that exercise may facilitate wound healing, in part, via neuroendocrine regulation. There's the elaborate mix of hormones of ...


3

I would have to see the videos in question, but I suspect that most of the time they are talking about stretching to increase the range of motion. For the vast majority of the general public, this isn't going to be a problem as "normal" day to day flexibility should be more than sufficient for basic fitness and lifting routines. If, however, you have ...


3

"Injury" in the context of weightlifting typically refers to repetitive strain injuries. Lifting heavy weights is meant to stress the muscles, but too much stress (high weight or not enough recovery) can cause a muscle to tear. Heavy weights also strain the tendons and joints. You could encounter knee pain due to an overused patellar tendon, or shoulder pain ...


2

Some of it is person dependent, but it's not the muscles that generally get injured. The things that tend to deteriorate are the joints, cartilage and bursa. These wear down over time, and can lead to injuries. Every sport/activity when practiced for a long time has its own "signature" injuries due to long time, repetitive motion. Golf, for example, has a ...


2

Here are some core workouts I can think of that shouldn't use the shoulder. Superman (without arms extended) Crunches Reverse Crunch Bicycles Side Crunch Source: I hurt my shoulder back in January and did a lot of these instead of the plank family.


2

Shoulder injuries are one of the most difficult injuries to overcome. They are right up there with knee and neck injuries. My recommendation to you is to stop all weight exercises that involve the shoulder immediately. Allow the joint to rest properly for at least a month before returning to using weight and begin slowly. Low weight, low reps. In the ...


2

Recovering from injury is a tricky thing, especially for active people who want to get moving again. Strength exercises can definitely help with injury recovery, but not knowing the specifics of your situation, I'd definitely suggest seeing a professional, like a physiotherapist, for an assessment and recommendations. My guess is that you'll need to start ...


2

Although weakness or limited mobility anywhere in the kinetic chain may lead to excessive pronation as a compensation, limited ankle dorsi-flexion is often a prime culprit. To test your dorsi-flexion range you can see if you can fully squat without lifting your heels or losing your balance. Or another quick lunge test uses a ruler and the wall. If you find ...


2

A few thoughts... Dehydration is a common trigger, and it's easy for that to happen if you work out for long periods. Milk of magnesia is your friend. It works by changing the osmotic balance of your intestines and keeping more water in the intestinal tract, making things softer. Great when you are having issues. I cycled regularly with hemmorhoids and not ...


2

You can probably try and work around the restrictions your doctor has set and train in the coming months and do this triathlon - and maybe you'll do ok, but maybe training too early will weaken it, and you'll do irreparable damage and never do a triathlon again. Maybe you'll injure your arm so bad that you can never lift anything heavier than a paper cup ...


2

Because the rails restrict the sled to a single degree of freedom, I would think not: loading the machine asymmetrically should not result in any noticeable change in the forces on the user or the effort needed to perform the exercise. This, of course, assumes that the friction of the sled on the rails is not significantly altered by the asymmetrical ...


2

Yes it can. Many professional athletes have life-long injuries from their training. Find a good physical therapist who can help you - it sounds like your having some im-balances that can be solved.


2

I injured my low back and groin while deadlifting as a young man. Had an MRI, inconclusive about the degree of herniation (hence it must be slight), but apparently there was damage to the casing of the disk. Have an intense "full" and "hot" feeling in my lower legs at times. Was very worried at first, because I did not know how to alleviate the symptoms ...


2

It's pretty subjective, as it's going to be according to your own healing rate. However, the reason that they have not really caused any pain before, is that while they are turning black and falling off, they are still acting as a protective cover for the nail bed (Much like a scab for a scrape/cut). In this case, I am assuming that for health reasons, they ...


1

I also recommend an expert to look at it. I would probably start with a PT instead of a doctor, but either should work. Back muscles are weird. You can have cases where a muscle is persistently tight but not painful, and then some occurrence will trigger it to get painful. The fix will likely be some combination of massage, pressure-point therapy, ...


1

First and foremost, if you haven't already, go and see a professional about your back. Even minor back injury is very serious and can cause further damage if it's not properly dealt with. You should really get advice from an MD or physical therapist to prevent any further injury. Even if you have to really baby your spine, there's a lot you can still do in ...


1

I agree with everyone's comments above - check with your doctor to see if walking and/or running would be appropriate for your condition. And working with a physical therapist would help you establish an appropriate exercise program. Without good sensation, one of the biggest problems you could face is skin problems. Even a simple blister can turn into a ...


1

The jury is currently out, so the best answer right now is either "it depends" or "we don't know". The common lore is that it does three things Flushes waste items out of the muscles due to the restriction/release of the cold and then warming Reduce swelling and tissue impacts Slow down the post trauma metabolic effects. Studies on the subject have been ...


1

I don't think they will help the achilles problem. My advice: You don't need to stop running necessarily, but you don't want it to get any worse. Start with active stretching (running drills), start running slowly and work up to the pace you are aiming for. You could also try heating your achilles up before you go run as well. Afterwards check out PNF ...


1

I am not sure if a Calf sleeve is going to solve your problem, it certainly won't hurt. Here is what I suggest: Stretch before you run Ice after and often during the day Take Ibuprofen to reduce the swelling Avoid hills if you can: The strain on your achilles is greater as you ascend a hill Slow down, the less strain you put on your achilles the less ...



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