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Recommendations With Little Impact on Joints Biking: If you have access to a stationary bike or you have an actual bike, this is a good exercise for you. There isn't a lot of stress on the joints and you can go at your own pace (although going fast is recommended). If you have access to a Spin class also, I would recommend it as you would have a lot of ...


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Not much you can do. If you are restricted enough that you can't run, and can't even lean on the bars (Much less get into aero position), its going to be just trying to keep in the best shape you can. What I would honestly do (Especially considering swim is your weakest point), is do the trainer for now. Sign up for Trainerroad, or get some of the ...


4

My susceptibility to neck strains decreased significantly after I started focusing on overhead mobility. For me that meant overhead presses, overhead squats, one-arm overhead pressing while in a squat, plus—and this is important—all the mobility work necessary to support those exercises. I suspect that other methods of increasing stability overhead would ...


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I am a veteran runner (and I have also suffered ITBS when I began to run). Even worse, I have what's called "Morton's Toe" so that I am not even supposed to be running according to orthopaedics and podiatrists I am very sceptic in regard to stability additions to shoes for beginners and gait analysis. The reasons for that is common sense: When you ...


3

"Injury" in the context of weightlifting typically refers to repetitive strain injuries. Lifting heavy weights is meant to stress the muscles, but too much stress (high weight or not enough recovery) can cause a muscle to tear. Heavy weights also strain the tendons and joints. You could encounter knee pain due to an overused patellar tendon, or shoulder pain ...


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I herniated a disc ten years ago and it changed my life. In the long run for the better. I was 6'4 250 lbs with a bodyfat percentage well north of 20%. I was not healthy. I was playing a lot of baseball and the combination of the excess pressure on my midsection from being overweight and the wear and tear from excess rotation (swinging) was something my ...


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Granted, this is somewhat opinion based, but, I can relate to your situation, although, in a slightly more serious vein. I was a competitive bodybuilder for many years. Initially, I was diagnosed with a herniated disc, but, later diagnosed with a slightly more serious condition that ultimately required surgical intervention by a neurosurgeon. So, for your ...


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I would have to see the videos in question, but I suspect that most of the time they are talking about stretching to increase the range of motion. For the vast majority of the general public, this isn't going to be a problem as "normal" day to day flexibility should be more than sufficient for basic fitness and lifting routines. If, however, you have ...


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It's pretty subjective, as it's going to be according to your own healing rate. However, the reason that they have not really caused any pain before, is that while they are turning black and falling off, they are still acting as a protective cover for the nail bed (Much like a scab for a scrape/cut). In this case, I am assuming that for health reasons, they ...


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The best I could find was a 2005 study which focused on older adults. They haven't identified the actual components causing the associations, but the relationship is there: Thus, the data are consistent with the notion that exercise may facilitate wound healing, in part, via neuroendocrine regulation. There's the elaborate mix of hormones of ...


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Shoulder injuries are one of the most difficult injuries to overcome. They are right up there with knee and neck injuries. My recommendation to you is to stop all weight exercises that involve the shoulder immediately. Allow the joint to rest properly for at least a month before returning to using weight and begin slowly. Low weight, low reps. In the ...


2

Recovering from injury is a tricky thing, especially for active people who want to get moving again. Strength exercises can definitely help with injury recovery, but not knowing the specifics of your situation, I'd definitely suggest seeing a professional, like a physiotherapist, for an assessment and recommendations. My guess is that you'll need to start ...


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Yes it can. Many professional athletes have life-long injuries from their training. Find a good physical therapist who can help you - it sounds like your having some im-balances that can be solved.


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Because the rails restrict the sled to a single degree of freedom, I would think not: loading the machine asymmetrically should not result in any noticeable change in the forces on the user or the effort needed to perform the exercise. This, of course, assumes that the friction of the sled on the rails is not significantly altered by the asymmetrical ...


2

I injured my low back and groin while deadlifting as a young man. Had an MRI, inconclusive about the degree of herniation (hence it must be slight), but apparently there was damage to the casing of the disk. Have an intense "full" and "hot" feeling in my lower legs at times. Was very worried at first, because I did not know how to alleviate the symptoms ...


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You can probably try and work around the restrictions your doctor has set and train in the coming months and do this triathlon - and maybe you'll do ok, but maybe training too early will weaken it, and you'll do irreparable damage and never do a triathlon again. Maybe you'll injure your arm so bad that you can never lift anything heavier than a paper cup ...


2

Here are some strategies I have found to be useful. Do not program a separate shoulder day. Prefer push/pull split routines instead. Otherwise your supraspinatus and front deltoids will work twice (during chest day and shoulder day) and so your infraspinatus and rear delts as well (during back day and shoulder day). This reduces their recovery ability and ...


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My habit is to go for a short run before committing to a race after an injury. What I'm looking for is any modifications to my running gait because of the injury. I know from experience that if I have to modify something because of pain then I simply shouldn't run. Otherwise, toughen up and run the race; even if just for more race experience.


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I would recommend you try a trusted training program. It's possible you're suffering from DOMS, not "joint pain". Regardless, if you're doing the wrong things it will be painful and short lived. If you do a good program, you'll strengthen your muscles and connective tissues (joints) in a safe and effective way.


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but i can't do cardiovascular training or most body-weight type training due to the strain my weight puts on my joints Why do you think you can't work your heart or upper body? There are lots of exercises you can do for your heart that are easy on your joints. The first that comes to mind is swimming, which is actually very good at training your ...


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Pain If you have possible injuries, you should absolutely consult a doctor, and not the internet. You will quite probably need a scan of some sort. If I had to venture a guess, I'd say you've pulled a muscle, or possibly torn a tendon/ligament, depending on the intensity of the pain. 60 bridges sounds like a possible cause here. Oh, and about those ...


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Nothing beats running of course, but it looks like you have to scratch that off your list entirely. You might want to give cycling a shot. With clipless pedals and shoes the force is delivered through the ball of your foot, not really at the toes. Also, you can drag the cleat back on the shoe that it's pretty far to the back of your ball. Very stiff shoes, ...


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“CrossFit Endurance coach and 100-mile trail run fanatic, Brian MacKenzie of Costa Mesa, California, scrawled a simple looking workout set on a whiteboard in his home gym, then spent five minutes teaching me proper rowing technique. I was in need of a workout to help me retain fitness while I rehabbed a foot injury, so he directed me to a rowing ...


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You can certainly find ways to keep your cardiovascular system intact while you let your toe heal. However, I think you may want to carefully consider the wisdom of trying to run a marathon less than 3 months after what you describe as "severely damaged" ligaments. If it takes "at least 6 weeks" before your doctor says that you can begin to run, that gives ...


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I've been through a similar endeavor, and in my case, it was a case of a pulled muscle. It's very normal to have low flexibility turn into muscle-pulls. Especially during squats, where a very heavy load is placed on muscles that are required to be elastic, or be destroyed. I suggest you start stretching your lower body quite thoroughly. Not only is it going ...


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Yes and no. If you're worried about permanent damage, pain is often the indicator that lets you know something is wrong. Therefore you should NOT take medication which inhibits pain. Instead, you could give the 5k a shot, but abort if the pain gets too substantial. But if, as you suspect, it's really just a minor injury, then the pain can of course be ...


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I yanked an adductor the other day. Just speaking from my own experience, it played out a little like this: Deadlifting was okay. Overhead pressing, bench pressing, pullups, and dips were all fine. Squatting I waited about a week, then started with ramping sets (empty bar, 50% of 1RM, 60% of 1RM, I think I maxed around 75% of 1RM. Olympic lifts I waited ...


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A lot of people are saying otherwise too. The important distinction is the difference between flexibility and mobility. People think flexibility is important, but it is actually inferior to mobility. I would recommend you to look at Kelly Starrett's videos and talks; also he has a very good book about mobility which is called Becoming a Supple Leopard. ...


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Just because the session is short does not mean you can't get anything done. There are massive challenges in programming for a post recovery surgery, and I honestly think you would be far better served from seeking physical therapy from a professional that works with athletes. We don't know enough about your particular case to comment safely, and not being ...


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If you're going to exercise while recovering from a heavy surgery, first get your doctors to sign off on EVERY exercise you plan to do. All that being said, this should be a time of rest and recovery for you. Focus your efforts on recovery, healthy eating, and maybe start a hobby to pass the time, maybe even spend the time reading books on fitness and ...



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