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7

Well, on the scary side, squats can lead to lower-back problems, spinal compression, torn ligaments in several parts of the body, burst capillaries, blown knees, or compound fractures of the leg. On the other hand, major injuries are rare, and even the minor ones are unlikely with good technique (keeping your knees over your feet and a straight back). And ...


6

There may be hope for recovery. Here are the hard truths. Some injuries are permanent. Some injuries are temporary. Some injuries would be temporary, but are not taken care of properly, so they become ongoing problems. There is no way people on the internet, who have never seen your knee or your wrist, can tell you if your injuries are permanent or ...


6

The bottom line is you want your shoulder in a neutral position. That doesn't necessarily mean full scapular retraction, but it's a cue that helps a lot of people. Considering your level of experience, and the fact you came off of injury I would advise you to use that scapular retraction, but only to the point where your shoulder is in a neutral position. ...


3

You have an injury. The Internet can't help with a physical injury. You need to go see a doctor and assess the situation. We have absolutely no way of helping you since you provide little to no valuable information about the injury. And even if we knew, you have no way of knowing who's qualified, and who's pretending. We do not give medical advice.


3

Unfortunately, this is very much individually determined, but there are a few things that you can look out for. If you have persistent soreness, it may not be healed or may not be healed properly. If that is the case, you may need to visit your health care provider and possibly be referred to a specialist. If you still note weakness, that may or may not be ...


3

In addition to squatting (light and heavy are both beneficial), I'd suggest looking at Ido Portal's squat mobility routines, as superbly organized and referenced by Antranik. Here's the link; look into the Mobility-Hips/Legs/Spine section. These drills should get you started, but don't stop at that. Look for other such drills and also explore your own ...


3

My personal philosophy for using straps is to use them when I don't want my grip strength to limit the effect an exercise will have on a muscle group I'm trying to work. If I'm doing Romanian deadlifts, barbell shrugs, barbell rows after deadlifts (conversely, I don't use them on Pendlay rows since I reset the bar between reps), or Kroc rows, I'm more likely ...


2

I've been through a similar endeavor, and in my case, it was a case of a pulled muscle. It's very normal to have low flexibility turn into muscle-pulls. Especially during squats, where a very heavy load is placed on muscles that are required to be elastic, or be destroyed. I suggest you start stretching your lower body quite thoroughly. Not only is it going ...


2

Ref foam rollers.They don't work for me! Here is my story. I am 74 in a very good shape, I exercise regularly and I practice moderately a number of sports, including bicycling, kayaking and windsurfing in summer. Last winter, one year ago, I had sprained a back muscle while unsuccessfully resisting falling on the ice on my way home. A week after,the ...


2

This question brings back memories. I’m a competitive rower and I had a similar situation. Although, my symptoms were more situated in the rhomboid/trap region without shoulder inflammation. I did, however, have some discomfort in the shoulder. Here are some of the exercises/stretches I had to do as part of my rehab. Thoracic Extension Thoracic ...


2

I'm in the no-strap no-glove camp. I trained for a while in powerlifting, and if you lift raw you can't use straps. So I'm of the mindset that a deadlift is how much you can lift, and that includes how much you can hold onto. To that end, once I get up north of my 5RM I'll use a mixed grip. I think if you need help holding onto the bar at 5RM or lower then ...


2

I've been sidelined with achilles tendinitis for 8 months now. I can't run or bike either; the only thing I can do is swim. Swimming has worked well for me; I highly recommend it. You won't mess up your achilles further but you'll retain cardio fitness. Any stroke works, and swimming is gentle enough that you can do it for hours if you want. A word of ...


2

Given the limitations the questioner encounters, a simple solution would be to either to hit the heavy bag for half an hour a day, or sit and perform lightweight dumbell exercises going through the entire range of possible joints and muscles, also for half an hour. Keep up a steady pace, elevate the heart rate, and keep going for the full 30 mins. In my many ...


1

First, I'll echo Alec's comment. If you've been diagnosed with spinal stenosis, you should seek the advice of a qualified therapist. Additionally, you may wish to get another opinion and an MRI as x-rays are not the best indicator of spinal stenosis: The X-rays can show the doctor various signs associated with spinal stenosis, including loss of the ...


1

I tore my ACL about half way, and was told at the time i would be on crutches for a minimum of six months, so that was over 30 years ago. I was working on fire protection on the 8th tallest building in the world at the time, and taking 6 months off was not in the cards. So i started working out like a fiend, and rehabbed my way out of the worst of it. ...


1

Sprains in joints only get better as they heal and working with the range/weight they support. If the pain is particularly bad or recurring I suggest visiting a sports clinic or other suitable health care provider and getting an x-ray done. When I had a really bad sprain I had this done and the doctor checked to make sure cartilage, joint and bone had no ...


1

Most of the common leg exercises involve the knee (joint, tendons and muscles). Therefore you could just pick any exercise which involves the knee to strengthen it. The muscle you should be targeting the most will be the muscles of the quadricep (front leg). By strengthening the muscle you will also strengthen the tendons. You should not over do it though, ...


1

Calm down......there is no cause for anxiety. REALLY! In addition to the splendid answer provided above, I'd chime in and remind you that Weightlifting (and exercises in general) is a long-term program. Even if you take a year off to heal properly, you'll easy bounce back when you decide to continue lifting. What you don't want is to turn a ...


1

It depends on how bad your injury is. When I went through a pretty serious sprained ankle injury, I did a lot of physiotherapy exercises for improving the stability and the ROM of this area before starting leg training again, including treatment with electricity and a very painful stretching massage. Only about 3-4 months after the injury I started working ...


1

I don't retract my shoulderblades fully, but engage pretty forcefully the muscles that retract the scapulae in most major exercises: front squat, back squat, deadlift, overhead press, pull-ups, and so on. If you're rounding your upper back forward during any of those then something is weak and wrong.


1

I dont think that there is a general approach, there are some practical advices and each person need to test the effiziency and benefit of them. Here are some recommendations that I follow, they might help you too: I contract while benching the whole movement through as I feel more stable, I also focus on keeping the shoulders low (away from the ears) ...


1

I would stay away from isolation workouts and go to compound workouts since other bigger muscles can help out in the routines. Types of exercises (dumbbell): Bench Press, Incline Bench Press (go light on this), Flyes Types of exercises (cables): Seated rows, lat-pull (use wide grip so you don't use too much shoulder), Cable Cross overs, cable flyes For ...


1

If your body is able to withstand the stress exercise places on your injury without worsening your condition, then you should exercise. How are you able to determine whether or not your body can withstand the stress? The only way is to exercise and observe the result. There are obvious risks involved in this. No one can advise you whether or not you ...


1

Yes, and I do not have a history of knee problems. I have 2 pairs of compression tights I wear for cold weather runs. I also have several pairs of non-compression tights both insulated and not. I like the feel of the compression tight, however, I do experience knee discomfort and pain when wearing them on any run over a few miles. It seems like the tights ...


1

I am experiencing the same thing. I have a history of knee issues (mostly ITB) and wearing tights for running (and sometimes even wearing skinny jeans throughout the day) seems to exacerbate the problem. I have been running very short distances (3-4k) at an easy pace for the past couple of months to ease back into things and not re-injure myself. The first ...


1

Due to the small market for the disabled, you really need to be creative. In some cases the disabled person will have equipment special made for them, and in others they will make do with something off the shelf. In the video, it looks like the person in question used an off the shelf strap that was tied in a way to anchor the bar. I've seen injured ...


1

Yes, by all means. When you do bicep curls, your primary goal is to stress your biceps, and as few other muscles as possible. Find a position and trajectory in which you only put stress on your biceps, so that your deltas are involved very mildly, merely to keep your arm position steady, not to help it pull the weight. It is impossible to avoid using the ...


1

Several years ago I began feeling a sharp pain in my left shoulder (behind my deltoid muscle, near the joint) during chest exercises. At first the pain was minor so I kept with my normal weightlifting routine. Over the next few weeks, however, the pain became progressively worse. It finally reached a point where I could no longer do any chest exercises (or ...


1

You need to find what works for you, depending on the severity and manner of shoulder impingement. For some people a flat bench press hurts but an incline one feels strangely fine. Others find that barbell work is problematic but dumbbell work doesn't cause issues. I'd suggest some experimentation, but again this all depends on how severe your impingement ...


1

Although elliptical machine can simulate running, it is very different than actual running. It's really good to recover from an injury and a great way to get the legs back in shape but to be able to run, you have to start running. In my opinion, you can try the couch-potato to 5K run since it's easy and builds your running abilities quite fast. And ...



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