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6

Short answer: Yes, see The 60-Day Challenge. It will get you to a base level of strength, and help burn fat – assuming you don't overcompensate with the amount of food you eat. However, I would look into body weight exercises to help the rest of your body. For example: Dips Pistols Back extensions Glute-ham raises Reverse rows When you get strong ...


6

If you by "effective training" mean run faster, then I would concentrate on interval training based on Jack Daniels work (also on Wikipedia). You can find a page that will help you with all the relevant numbers here. E.g. if you run 7:15 per mile, then you should consider training intervals where you run 400m in 1:55 then jog 1 minutes and repeat this 4-6 ...


4

I don't have a standard regimen for you either, and I hope that someone posts one. I use the Energy Zones methodology for swimming, and while this document is specific to swimming, the exact same principals apply to running. The zones relate to metabolic processes: aerobic recovery, aerobic development, mixed anaerobic/aerobic, anaerobic, and creatine ...


4

According to Jack Daniels, the difference is the following: interval training aims to increase your VO2MAX by targeting high intensities, which can't be maintained for a longer period. By design it achieves to maximize the overall volume for those very high intensities because you have breaks between each interval. longer (several kilometres) tempo runs ...


4

I can see why this sounds confusing, but most runners record there training in miles or kilometres per week. So if you were to take 10-15% of your weeks running miles, I would think that's what it means. However, if your target is to improve your 10k, you may be better to do 10-15% high intensity running. Personally, I would think this will be more ...


3

You can use max heart rate to determine training zones assuming you can get an accurate max heart rate. There are several calculations you can use to guess a max heart rate zone. However, max heart rates can very drastically and in many cases is NOT an indicator of overall health. Some people have really high max heart rates because they have a very high ...


3

Do you own a smartphone/tablet? If it's available then get yourself an app for Tabata/HIIT. I personally use „Bodyweight Training by Mark Lauren“ (also available as book), which is progressive, customizeable and has a ton of exercises (and video descriptions for the iPad). A timer for tabata and a sample HIIT workout is also built-in. I think you get the ...


3

For me, the gold standard is whether I can use the device to time the Tabata protocol. That protocol is 8x(20s exercise, 10s rest). The most common exercise is sprinting. This is a difficult protocol to time. Your device must: Be programmable to beep alternating on 20s,10s intervals. Loud enough to hear when your heart is pounding and the wind is rushing ...


2

Ok. Well, given the nature of the routine, this question is kind of ambiguous. Maintenance in this case may be considered maintaining a certain weight (since the routine suggests it's a weight loss routine), or it could mean conditioning level (since this routine involves a significant amount of metabolic conditioning). Or, maybe it's both. Let's examine ...


2

Well that depends on what your goal is. Your intervals should be less than whatever your goal distance is - perhaps 50-75% of whatever the goal is. You want the pace of the intervals to be consistent throughout the workout. The first ones will be easy but the last ones will be hard. As you get better, you want to reduce the rest time between intervals - or ...


2

This article does, in a long way, answer your question: The Marathon Myth: High intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T.) vs. Long Duration Training (L.D.T.) I have written several FitBit Articles this year detailing the efficacy of High Intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T. training). H.I.I.T. has been shown to develop much higher levels of ...


1

Here's some theory for you. You get better when you put stress on your system. Intervals have the potential to put a lot of stress on your system, and therefore give you lots of improvement. However, they only work if you can work really hard at them, and you can only do that if you are very well rested. If you do intervals when you are not well rested, ...


1

You could just do burpees, pushups, situps, air squats, etc. with various rep schemes (e.g., 5 rounds of 10 pushups, 25 situps, 30 airsquats for time, or as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of 20 burpees, 100 unders with a jump-rope, 15 v-ups). Here's a great guide for no-equipment HIIT workouts: ...


1

I run a lot and lift moderately. I would love to add more stair stepping in. It is a good alternative to running and it is easy on the ankles and feet. I think the most important key is to keep those reps moving. Anytime you hit a new machine treat the first few sessions as a baseline and try to improve. To get a good workout keep the pace going - what ...


1

Looks to me like you have pretty solid interval routine. Like any cardio (or strength) training, how you train depends on your goals. The way you are doing it probably gives you the most bang-for-your-buck as far as calorie burning goes. Personally, I would probably just work to stay in the high-intensity range a bit longer every time. A heart-rate ...


1

"Is adding some supplementation "just in case" a good idea? If so, how much should I add?" "Can the conditioning training interfere with my body recomposition program, which is based on eating pattern changes?" "Can this program hinder my efforts to improve my endurance/condition?" The answer to all these questions is... yes! To understand why, ill ...


1

Another method is the Oregon system. I followed the Jack Daniels system in college and the Oregon system after college. I had much more success with the Oregon system. Many have success with Jack Daniels, other's not. The important thing is that there is no magical way, everyone is different. A simple summary of what I might do with Oregon might be this ...


1

This may not be the answer that you're looking for, but it is the solution to the problem that I have which is similar. I also love the custom intervals on the RunKeeper, and am frustrated with it's inaccuracy sometimes with the GPS. First of all, some tips for making RunKeeper work better: If you don't mind a strap, get an arm band and run with the ...


1

(Q & an A, moved to answer for space.) Are you specifically seeking a "stopwatch", a single-purpose tool, a watch with interval capabilities, or a smartphone app (my recommendation)? Are you looking to track intervals, in which case anything with lap counting will do, or be notified at interval changes? Do you have simple, or complex, interval plans? I ...



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