Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

52

I prefer running outdoors for several reasons... It can keep your mind somewhat more engaged than when using a treadmill (i.e. taking in the scenery, etc.) (and possibly keep it away from the fact that you're exercising). You get to go somewhere and see things other than the inside of a gym. As Greg mentioned, the natural benefits of fresh air and ...


47

Evidence shows that more than 5 days a week training increases your risk of musculoskeletal injury. Rest is physically necessary so that the muscles can repair, rebuild and strengthen -- continuous training can actually weaken it. Without sufficient time to repair, the body will continue to breakdown from intensive exercise. Overtraining often occurs from ...


36

A few advantages to running outdoors: Sunshine (get your vitamin D!) Depending on smog levels and your gym's cleanliness and air filtration system, there is probably fresher cleaner air outside. If you run "barefoot" (e.g. Vibrams) on dirt/grass, you'll get some extra stabilizing work. If you get chased by a dog, you'll have extra motivation to really push ...


23

I've read a good article/study on this, but I can't find a link to it right now. The general idea for criticism regarding the treadmill that I recall was that the movement is not as natural as it seems, because the treadmill is moving your leg backwards instead of your muscles doing all of that and this apparently can create strength imbalances.


19

I'd say this depends on your fitness, the intensity of the workout and perhaps how much you've eaten the night before. Assuming jogging means a running speed of about ~10 km/h or ~6 mph, I expect you don't use that much energy that you can't cope with without jogging. More importantly, low intensity workouts mainly burn through fat and anything you would ...


16

Before dismissing treadmills I'll point out some advantages of running on [your own] treadmill: Even surface so the chance of injury (tripping for example) is reduced Less impact on knees and feet - no concrete For longer runs, no worrying about the toilet or carrying drinks with you More accurate measurement of timing and distance which helps for ...


15

Without rest, you will build muscle mass quicker than your supporting organs can build and adjust to enable their proper use. At that point, you will hit a plateau which you will be unable to cross. However, this does not hold true for aerobic exercise, where the Mayo Clinic suggests 30 minutes daily. This is more for muscle building and strength training.


12

I don't have any source for this but my chiropractor and my experience, but I advise against working out in the morning on an empty stomach. My goal is to burn fat through 30-45 minutes of low intensity exercise 3-4 mornings a week, but trying to burn fat without any carbs doesn't work; your body ends up eating its own protein (read: muscle). From ...


11

Plyometric exercises are specialized, high intensity training techniques used to develop athletic power (strength and speed). Plyometric training involves high-intensity, explosive muscular contractions that invoke the stretch reflex (stretching the muscle before it contracts so that it contracts with greater force). The most common ...


11

If you're only exercising for an hour at a time, no need to really eat much before, but I would suggest drinking water before and after, and if the run goes for longer than an hour, during as well. If you're only after weight loss, don't have a high carb recovery meal afterwards, stick to low fat protein. I find that I only really need to eat before ...


9

Kudos for wanting to be more active! Here are some tips: Enlist a gym/work-out buddy! Knowing someone is counting on you and holding YOU accountable for showing up will help motivate you to get moving. You can always walk to a mid-point and grab lunch together. But you must recognize if your "buddy" is making excuses and making it easier for you to quit ...


9

Sounds like you are doing great; and no, you are certainly not wasting your time. The new physical activity guidelines according to the cdc say that you can break up your exercise into 10 minute workouts and still get the health benefits as long as you are getting at least 150 minutes (2.5 hrs.) per week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as ...


9

It depends what you're doing right now. If you're not running that much right now, then yes, starting to run 3.2 miles, 2x per day will increase your risk of injury, specifically overuse injuries (like stress fractures, iliotibial band syndrome, achilles tendonitis, for example). However, it is possible to build up to that amount of load safely. There's a ...


8

Yes. Training for strength & power - low reps, heavy weight, compound lifts, explosive movements - can help your speed & acceleration. If you train your muscular endurance - high reps, low weight, Crossfit or Crossfit Endurance style metcons - you'll help your endurance running. However, it's worth mentioning a few things: Not all exercises are the ...


8

For me, the best non-aesthetic benefit to running outside is far better sweat evaporation (if weather cooperates), and therefore a cooler body temperature throughout my run. My gym is air conditioned and the vent is close to my favorite treadmill--but not close enough to make a dent in my insane sweating. Whereas when I run outside, even at a somewhat ...


8

The unevenness of the ground outside can cause you to workout different muscles.


7

Using landmarks [buildings, trees, signs, etc.], you can do interval sprints easier than having to deal with treadmill settings.


7

I'm assuming the chafing is where your thighs are rubbing. Longer shorts, long underwear and bodyglide will help cut the chafing.


7

Stick to what is working for you. If you cannot run everyday, but OK with running on alternate days, do that. Unless there is some deadline due to competition, there is no point in over-stressing yourself. I am not a big runner myself and used be even worse, but I learned that persistence leads to good results and persistence is not possible if you do not ...


5

You can multi-task if you go outdoors! At my old job, I used to run to the post office to drop off mail. You could end your run at the grocery store and then walk back with groceries as your cool-down. It's easier to do a hill workout naturally than constantly pushing the buttons on a treadmill especially if you want to do a really steep hill (which can ...


5

You should have at least some protein prior to exercise. This will largely serve to prevent you from overeating after your workout is over, and will provide some excess energy during your workout.


5

The owner of the gym I go to said to drink a full glass of orange juice. It's light, so you won't get tired, but it will also fuel you.


5

You're running and you're consumed with the running but do you have any goals? Many high-caliber athletes suffer from obsessive-compulsive like orders (http://commons.pacificu.edu/pa/30/) and personal experience, though it's not always a bad thing but that what helps push through bad periods of training. Someone above mentioned social running. That might ...


4

For someone who is new at the sport, strength training not only helps prevent injuries but will increase muscle mass thereby making running easier which means your endurance and speed improves. However, for the elite-athlete (i.e. marathoners) the endurance gains are far less from strength training but more from just honing their craft - they just run a ...


4

Any time you perform an activity that causes joint pain or soreness, you're doing long-term cumulative damage to your joints. Typically, soccer (football) should not cause knee joint pain. There are a few different things that can cause this: Incorrect or badly fitted footwear. Try some different shoes. Incorrect technique/balance/weight. If you're ...


4

Supercompensation would be some of the explanation if the goal is to get in better shape. As I understand it: When the body rests it creates more muscle mass than what was actually destroyed during the exercise.


4

No breakfast, but half of an energy bar before jogging is good to get some sugar and carbs in your system to get the jogging started. Then a not too heavy but well-rounded breakfast afterwards.


4

I've been going to gym for around 4 years, where I sometimes run on a treadmill, but I don't really enjoy it for longer period of time. But about 3 months ago, I started running outdoors every day and I totally love it. For me the biggest plus is, that I hafe to finish the track I choose. If I feel good, I take a longer track around the park and there's ...


4

No - tennis shoes are going to be slightly heavier and have more material/cushioning around the sides. They are meant for stability and lots of side to side movement. Running shoes are lighter and are built for forward movement. You will experience aches of all kinds of you do jogging/running in tennis shoes at any amount of frequency more than about a ...


4

Its funny I had something happen like this to me many years ago. My back would ache when I jogged for a certain amount of time but I was able to play soccer and basketball with no pain at all. I went and saw a dr about this who referred to a orthopedic dr. It turned out to be the following combination of things: I was overpronating basically my foot was ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible