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I've done the ketogenic diet for some months last year. Some of this is thus anecdotal and highly personal, your mileage may vary. First I'll go with some actual objective stuff. The ketogenic diet, before becoming a health fad (not necessarily a bad thing) had been used to treat epilepsy. This means you can find some medical literature about it and there's ...


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It's quite normal to feel "weak" on a ketogenic diet, at least compared to one with a normal amount of carbs in it. You need energy from either fat or carbs. Fat is stored for longer and the energy "lasts" longer(but spikes less), whereas carbs spike quite fast and drop off more steeply. From the sound of it, perhaps you aren't getting enough good fats in ...


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If anything, I'd definitely avoid cardio in your case. Here's a study (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7380688) where people, who exercised after their glycogen reserves were already wiped out, burned away 13.7 grams of proteins per hour of exercise (that was measured through sweat alone), which is an equivalent of a little below 70 grams of muscle mass. ...


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I think you could better just keep on lifting. As said above you won't hit the same numbers, but there is always a technical flaw you could try to work on. You could also use the time you are now not lifting to learn new movements. I can't tell how experienced you are but you could try other types of squats as example: goblet squat front squat box squats ...


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Give your body a break. Increase your calories for a week or two, then reduce them about ten to 20 percent a day. Your body will get out of starvation mode and you will slowly start losing again. Worst thing to do is panic when the weight goes up and return to your body punishing routine.



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