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6

When your knees hurt after running, it's usually an indication that your thigh/hip muscles are not strong enough, and your knees are bearing the brunt. You have to systematically strengthen your various leg muscles. Here's what has helped me (non-exhaustive list but covers the major categories) For the glutes Walt Reynold's ITB special (really important - ...


5

There is a certain technique of foot strike that runners use for distance running, and that's known as midfoot striking. Your issue, commonly known as runner's knee, seems to be likely from the biomechanical issue discussed in this article. In essence, if your footfalls are striking hard on the heel, then the entire shock of the impact is traveling ...


5

There certainly is a common error people seem to be making based on what I have read in this article: Improper sequencing. Front squats are deceiving because while it's a primarily knee-dominant movement pattern, you still want to initiate the movement from the hips first and push your butt back before breaking from the knees. It's an almost ...


5

Since the symptoms respond to NSAIDs, the injury is likely inflammation related. That's why tendinitis or synovitis is usually the diagnosis. Without allowing the tendinitis to fully heal, it can reoccur frequently. However, since I'm not a doctor I will limit my answer to the exercise related portion. Stair climbing, treadmills, jogging all produce a ...


4

Ok, this is in response to your comment, but it needs to be an answer. Comment blockquoted below: I use a stretching "machine" (not sure what to call it, it uses your own bodyweight) and also I stretch by crouching down, and also by standing and pulling one foot up behind Don't do that. At least not before you workout. There are two main types of ...


3

There is alot of good info about running injuries and ITB syndrome, so I'll try to highlight some of the answers that will help to answer your question: Regarding Warm-up: @Ryan gives a good running warm up with video links in answering this question: Best warm up for running. Generally dynamic exercises are recommended prior to the workout. Static ...


3

I wish I could always have perfect form but this isn't possible, say, on the last 2 reps of my last heavy set. I keep proper form >90% of the time. I think the proper answer to this question is to do everything in your power possible to maintain proper form at > 99.9% of the time. If that means dropping the weight, then do so. Gutting out those last ...


3

A common condition that matches your description is patellar tendonitis. It certainly could be other ailments as well. You can try taking a NSAID for a few days. I will typically take the maximum dosage of Aleve (naproxsen) for up to 4 days before reducing dosage over the next week at most. You don't want to stay on a NSAID for an extended period of ...


2

First, a small point. Right below your knee is not a muscle, that is the patellar tendon. I have a couple questions that might point out a few things. You say you haven't run in a while, and now you have been running a week. How long is a while? And in that week, how much did you run, and what kind of running was it? What kind of surface do you run on? And ...


2

I've had issues with my knees since I tore them all up at 14 years old. If it is an injury, you need to be super careful not to make it worse. When I push myself too hard, I'll have some stiffness and pain in the joint, and the soft area directly below the kneecap becomes inflamed and feels weird to the touch. Over time, with regular exercise without ...


2

The solution is in your question. You have pain only when you lose form, so the solution is obviously keeping good form. If you lose form towards the end than you are simply not concentrating, I don't believe it is muscular. Before the last sets take a slightly longer break (get your pulse down), then focus, and lift. Also, stop looking at the hot chicks! ...


2

The knee is very complex and it can be difficult to say what is good/bad for yours specifically. What is good/bad entirely depends on your condition and strength level. To make matters worse, even physios can disagree (depending on where and when they learnt, and how much they keep up with their science). For example, I've been told by some doctors and ...


2

What you're going through sounds similar to an experience that I had. I was a college athlete, I played basketball and tennis every day of the week and lifted multiple times a week. I had very bad pain in both of my knees and it was due to tendonitis above and below the knee cap. I was treated for this but the pain consisted. I finally went in and got my ...


1

LarissaGorilla, Reading and anecdotal experiences have shown that weight squatting helps with knee pains. While i can't give a resource-backed answer at the moment, my theory is that: Squatting improves the strength of your body, including your thighs, overall legs, and body. Because the legs are now stronger, the muscles are more able to sustain the ...


1

I have played around with this subject too, especially when I run in my huarache sandals. They slap the ground quite loudly and you can hear me coming a mile away. I read a good tip to combat this problem. When you're running, try to imagine that you are running on delicate rice paper. Land as if you're trying your best not to tear the paper - run softly, no ...


1

most probably your using to much of your heel like i used to, when you run or even walk for that matter, always pounce off from cushioned part of the foot underneath the toes (i know you understand what i mean), trust me its nothing to do with some knee syndrome or anything like that, thats simply finding a complicated answer for a simple question. just ...


1

Have it checked by a knee specialist. Could be a meniscus tear.


1

Yes, you should worry. I'd go see a doctor who may refer you to physio - not sure how it works in Germany sorry. Essentially, due to the slant in the pavement, you've been putting one knee (leg) under more abnormal pressure then the other. Running in reverse around the block is probably going to cause the same pain in the other knee. Seriously, I'd find a ...


1

I don't really understand your logic with your running direction; however, what you have is called runners knee. Its a very common knee injury where basically its inflammed from over use. There are tons of stretches you can do to be prevent this. Having a good muscular balance between your quadriceps and your hamstrings is crucial for runners to have if ...


1

I used to regularly suffer with IT band pain whilst running. I started running in January this year and up until approx. 2-3 months ago I would get IT band pain, however it was random as to when it happened. Sometimes it would be a mile into a run, others I could run for 10 miles and have no problems at all. I tried applying a tubi-grip type support to the ...


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Odds are your knees are not tracking out far enough. You should be spreading your knees as wide as possible throughout the movement. A perfect front squat is performed with the toes pointing straight forward. If you don't have the flexibility to do that, it's okay to point your toes out a bit. The further out your toes point, the worse it is on your ...


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Your knee is so important. If this were me, I would do two things. First I would lift lighter, as this means it will put less stress on the knee. If you do this and it still hurts, then you should go see a doctor and let them x-ray the leg to see what's going on. But like I said, look after your knee - it's so important!


1

If you don't already have a foam roller, get one! They're great for IT band issues and warming up/loosening muscles. I personally use a Stick for the same thing (pre & post run muscle stretching) but I don't have IT band issues so can't speak to the efficacy of a Stick on the IT band specifically.


1

As it stands, your question is way too vague to diagnose. The pain could be due to the ligaments in the knee, the muscles around the knee, bad form, bad equipment, muscular imbalance, tibial plateau fracture, etc etc. I would advise against any kind of knee caps (Not sure what they are) or sleeves or other structural adjunct without a sports doc saying "do ...


1

It's smart to get an assessment by a medical professional in cases where you have pain. However, it's also good to do basic maintenance on yourself. If you want to do some troubleshooting on your own, take a look at this article by Mike Robertson on knee pain. (I've linked to the first part; make sure to read all three.) To summarize what he says, as the ...


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For a similar answer, check this running knee pain thread. Knee pain does not just go away as it is caused by weakness. As a result, you need to strengthen the affected area. 4 reasons that usually cause knee pain while running 1) Weak Hips 2) Weak Thighs (Quads) 3) Tight Hamstrings 4) Tight IT Band This link shows a routine to address the 4 ...


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You should start swimming. I had runners knee for a while and my doctor recommended I swim because there is no impact.



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