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15

Nope, it's completely impossible to target and reduce fat in one spot on your body. The only way to lose fat in your thighs is to lose fat everywhere. On the other hand, you can target and improve the look of a specific body part. For your thighs I would suggest squats (but I suggest those for just about anything). Simply sprinting would help the ...


10

Itching/tingling indicates an increase in bloodflow due to expanded capillaries and arteries. This problem should go away as you increase your level of physical fitness. If the itching comes with a rash though, it's more likely to be exercise-induced anaphylaxis (an allergic reaction).


10

"Lower Body Exercises" Let's define our terms. In lifting, squats and deadlifts are considered the primary "lower body exercises", but in truth they develop strength in the entire body. You could focus on "legs" specifically by using machines (leg press, leg curl), but that would be wildly inefficient and unproductive. Heavy barbell squats and deadlifts ...


10

Here is some of the the best available evidence regarding knee problems and osteoarthritis (OA): Virtually all activities require weight bearing will put stress on the knee joints Activities and sports that will put more stress on the knees are (football, jumping, long distance running, soccer, and any other sports that require constant cutting, pivoting ...


9

No You cannot target specific areas of your body to lose fat*. See this answer to a similar question. Why It's called the Spot Reduction Myth. I explained it in this answer: Belief in spot reduction means that you think exercising your arms/abs/thighs/butt will specifically reduce the amount of fat on that area of your body. This is a ...


8

Properly performed full squats are not unbalanced. (Also, I doubt that a medicine ball is heavy enough to produce any muscular imbalance anyway.) I worry somewhat that the 90 degree angle you describe is not deep enough, so I advise you to read this history of squat depth recommendations. Squat deep, with the crease of the hip getting lower than the top of ...


8

That's the difference between conditioning and strength. Try 200lbs for 20 reps to get another view into conditioning, or pushing a sled. A well rounded training program will address the following points: Skill: if you compete or are learning new exercises, you have to hone your technique Strength: this is well understood, you have to be strong enough ...


7

Preface: this is anecdotal, and I Am Not A Doctorâ„¢ When I first began doing squats, I noticed exactly the same thing. I never had it as bad as you, but I did notice that on my way home from the gym, while walking to the bus, I could barely get the strength to continue walking, and if I tried to run I would almost collapse. The main cause is probably that ...


7

I'm all for the minimalist shoe movement. I wear Merrell Trail Gloves almost exclusively, including at my standing desk at work. However, there is something to be said for using the right tool for the job, and for biking VFFs are not the right tool for the job. That's not to say you can't wear them, especially if you have cage or platform pedals on your ...


7

The bizarre thing about delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is that we still don't really know what causes it. Though people like to attribute it to lactic acid buildup, that's probably a misconception. As stated in the article: Researchers who have examined lactate levels right after exercise found little correlation with the level of muscle soreness ...


6

As Sparafusile said, you can't target fat loss effectively. Try adding mass to your upper body instead to look more proportional. Also, with regards to Sparafusile's suggestion of doing leg exercises, this will certainly help with improving their composition. They might not lose size, but instead of looking flabby, they'll start to look more toned.


6

Make sure you're getting enough potassium. Sodium and potassium are both critical to fuel your muscles. The typical diet is rarely deficient in sodium. But it is common to have low potassium levels. In fact, an increase in physical activity will increase your body's demand for potassium. That could explain the prolonged soreness you're experiencing.


6

Air squats, forward and side lunges, sprawl, wall chair, and lots and lots of jump rope. (if possible) Vary it between lots of fast reps and holding in place for 30+ seconds or however long you can stand it. Do them correctly and form first, reps second. You'll majorly mess up knees and back if you do them with bad form.


6

You help muscle growth all over your body by using heavy compound lifts. The two exercises that provide the biggest bang for your buck are full depth squats (to parallel) and deadlifts. These exercises target: Calves Hamstrings Quadriceps Gluteous Upper and lower back Abs adductors and abductors (squats) forearms (grip on the deadlifts) biceps ...


6

I'll assume you're talking about lunge variants close to these: Walking lunge Standing lunge (forward) Standing lunge (backward) The walking lunge starts with the first part of the forward lunge (getting down into the lunge), and ends with the second part of the backward lunge (coming back up out of the lunge). While doing walking lunges, you never get ...


5

You say you are the ideal weight for your height. I'm assuming you mean according to the BMI measure. Your example would be the other reason I dislike that measure. BMI is a general indicator of someone who would be obese or underweight. It is by no means accurate, nor does it take into account your body fat. So, while you can't target where your body ...


5

I have found that running on really sore legs is a waste of time. My speed and endurance don't increase after those days and usually backslides. I will run on mildly sore/achy legs, but I will not run on really sore legs (the kind of soreness that does not go away after a few minutes running). If my legs are really sore, I stop and I don't run or do leg ...


5

Long-distance running is a natural human activity and is not inherintly bad for your knees I can't find a decent journal article, but the general consensus is that running is not bad for your knees. It is theorised that endurance hunting (i.e running after an animal until it dies of exhaustion) was the first form of hunting of humans. Bad shoes lead to bad ...


5

The stimulus that the leg press provides is difficult to replicate for the same reason that it has become a hassle for you, it allows for a lot of weight to be used. As mentioned by Berin, the weight you use for the leg press will greatly differ from the weight used on most other leg exercises. This makes it a hard exercise to replicate in terms of muscle ...


4

What about doing a Good Morning. Start Position: End Position:


4

I have a similar issue as I regularly play football so I try to run hard. I experience soreness especially in my thigh and calf muscles. I suggest you do some warm down and stretching after the exercise, this will help you bounce back sooner. I also have the benefit of a back yard swimming pool and after football I do a few laps and also some running in ...


4

This might be tough to hear, but you should also consider the fact that not everyone is gifted with a body that can handle pro-athlete levels of activity. If your legs are constantly tired/heavy, and you see no improvement (and ESPECIALLY if you see backwards progress), I would say your body is telling you it's not ready for that level of activity (at least ...


4

I read you previous post and wonder why you're not seeing a Dr. or a Sports Therapist to determine what the issue is with your knees. I go by the old advice of 'if it hurts, don't do it'. If you continue to run, you run the risk of doing more damage. If you do need to build up the muscles, tendons, etc. around your knees, I would recommend VERY light ...


4

Based on the information here and the information about your wife's knees having a low amount of cartilage, you want to avoid motions that require the knee to bend--particularly under weight. At first I was going to suggest weight training, as you are very controlled about the weight that you apply and it can strengthen the muscles and ligaments surrounding ...


4

Can lower body exercises help me? Absolutely Are they worth my time? Yes, and I've included ones that will get you out of the gym. If so, which exercises should I do? Start with lower body and core resistance training. Then move on to plyometrics. These will help with your running performance, reduce the chance of injuries and balance out your total ...


4

The only way to truly gain height (Assuming that you have stopped growing. An x-ray of your growth plates is the only way to determine that, although at age 30 it is extremely likely.) is for very expensive, painful and long recovery surgery. Basically they saw your bone in half, use a frame to suspend the bones a bit apart from each other and let the bone ...


4

There's more than one type of muscle mass, and training different rep ranges emphasize one over the other: Rep ranges 1-3: emphasizes myophibrilar hypertrophy (i.e. more protein pairs that actually perform muscle contractions) Rep ranges 4-6: balanced hypertrophy range (i.e. both myophibrilar hypertrophy and sarcoplasmic hypertrophy) Rep ranges 7-15: ...


4

Well that 'someone' is correct in some way. Your legs hold the biggest muscles (bigger than your back or chest) and it's a fact that muscles need a lot of energy. This means that big muscles burn more energy, so the bigger they are... you get it right. If you work your whole body though, you will burn fat much faster (obviously) Have a great time losing ...


4

This problem is called "valgus" knee. Its is more common for females due to the anatomy - wider hip and slight larger Q angle. However, here are some very common problems for most people with valgus knee, especially during squatting and landing: Weakness in hip abductors Weakness in hip external rotators Pronated feet (flat feet) Weakness in posterior ...



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