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in my opinion, if you got this sore after a training doesn't matter in any part of the body, is a good sign of growing the muscles.Are you stop for like sometimes and continue training again? or do you train often? Daily motivation and sharing


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Muscle soreness is irrelevant to muscle growth. It's just a sign you haven't exercised these particular muscles recently. Provided you've had enough rest and good calorie intake in the last few days, you are more than good to go and do the exercises. It's not a good idea to do it if you've done any intense leg exercise in the last ~72 hours. Spend 5 min ...


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Feeling sore is not a sure sign you are growing. If I understand you right, you haven't been working your legs for a while before this workout (you seem to contradict yourself in the next sentence), in that case, it's normal to feel sore. Higher rep count also seem to make you more sore, at least that's true for me.


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I think there's many reasons: Some likely do leg work but perhaps run a split routine and leg day is a day you're not in the gym. Some may do a leg intensive sport and working the upper body in the gym is a way to compensate On the other hand some may do an upper body intensive sport and so legs just aren't a goal for them Finally there will be some ...


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Many reasons, primarily because leg muscles aren't as visible and often not considered as important aestetically. This is the same reason people don't workout their back enough. Of course, in the long run, doing arms and chest will make you look silly and it will be obvious that you aren't really strong. Some people also think that because they ride their ...


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The general principle is that if you are looking to maximize your muscle mass, you work the larger muscles more than the smaller ones (i.e. more fatigue inducing reps). That means you would work your triceps more than your biceps, your quads and glutes more than your hamstrings, etc. You would also work your back and your general core more than everything ...


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There is no reason to train them more often, because as MÃ¥rten says, the fact that your legs are bigger, ensures that you use more weight, thus training them more. How often you train them depends entirely on your goals. For instance, a general worker-outer like me will do a split, and just rotate the days. But if you take a person who is actively looking ...


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Well, they already are. If you compare leg press with bench press, you'll probably leg press about 3 times as much weight as you bench. So the proportionality to muscle size is already there. Adding more reps or sets to your legs would be out of proportion.


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Your leg muscles will adapt to the workload placed on them, so it's not really possible to definitively say whether or not your legs will get bigger. If the effort you are putting out is more than you did squatting, then yes, your legs will grow. If it is the same, then your legs will stay about the same size, and if the bike effort is less, they will ...


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According to Wikipedia, The main muscles at work in cycling are the quadriceps and hamstrings in the upper leg, and the gastrocnemius and soleus in the calf. These muscles contract in a sequence that creates the pedaling action. The quadriceps and hamstrings do most of the work when you ride a bicycle. Assuming you do not know too much about how ...



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