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11

Cardio training doesn't necessarily lead to muscle loss, but generally, training time is limited, and if you're preparing for a marathon, you don't have the time to spend in the gym, and your body will be busy adapting to the stresses of long distance running, which are different than the adaptations needed for sprinting 100m, dunking a basketball, or moving ...


10

This article has links to actual studies showing no significant benefit to doing cardio with hand or ankle weights: ...if you are walking at a 3.5 mph pace and burning 5 calories per minute--adding a hand or ankle weight may make it feel harder, but you aren't actually burning more calories. A 2002 study in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical ...


10

I run only as fast as I can breath through my nose. Our respiratory system is designed such that for any level of aerobic activity in which we regularly participate we can obtain sufficient oxygen by breathing through our nose. I don't know what kind of pace you want to run at, or how long you mean by long distance, so there's considerable room for ...


9

You don't want to overdo electrolytes, so if you're going to get them from fruits or vegetables, don't add much of anything. An avocado is a great example to get potassium. Also, bananas are great as well. Presumably unprocessed banana chips (dehydrated banana) would be a good start. Celery is also a good way to up your sodium levels. All of your ...


9

I've used this illustration in a previous answer, and it really does a good job of demonstrating the idea: The things we care about on the illustration (in relation to your question) are the sarcoplasm and the myofibril. The myofibril is the part of the muscle that actually does the contraction, where the sarcoplasm is the part of the muscle that stores ...


8

Yes, there are benefits to training in the heat, but there are also risks. As @Ivo pointed out, you are far more likely to overheat / heat stroke / dehydrate when exercising in hot weather. However, if you take the proper precautions, there are benefits to be gained from training in the heat. What's more, these benefits will directly impact your success in ...


8

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From ...


7

Mens muscles are stronger. That's the biggest factor. They have stronger muscles, denser bones, mostly related to the effects of testosterone. Women are slower than men by an average of around 10% across all distances. You can see examples of this split, look at junior and young categories for many sports, and women are just as competitive as men (or ...


7

There are going to be a few different questions that will somewhat dictate the time needed to train. How much have you run in the past? - If you haven't run much, then getting to the point where you can do 50 miles (roughly 80k) is going to take longer than someone that has a more extensive running background. You also need to progress slower, as your body ...


6

The nature of tennis is 3-5 second bursts of speed with 3-5 seconds rest for around 30 seconds, followed by 30-60 seconds of rest. This suggests that the Phosphagen and Glycolitic pathways will be be called on the most. If you are able to play explosively for an hour or more before fatiguing, it is likely that the problem is not fitness, but nutrition. Your ...


6

There is nothing wrong with running outside. Simply wear layers and take precautions when running where ice buildup is likely. I spent quite a few years running cross country at 8000' elevations for college, and outside for the vast majority of it. This included during rain, snowstorms, predawn in the dark, etc. If you would rather run indoors, a treadmill ...


6

Any kind of training can produce increases in muscle mass. Aerobic training simply stops doing so very quickly, since it doesn't require much strength to perform. Aerobic training requires a small degree of strength repeated over a relatively long period of time. The body is more stressed by the requirements of repeating the exercise over a period of time ...


6

In both cases West-to-East and East-to-West jet lag does apply (not north and south / south and north). Basically your body and brain are completely out of sync due to the departure time and arrival time when travelling through different time zones. I strongly suggest arriving a few days (atleast 3, some people prefer 1 week) earlier before your marathon. ...


6

Absolutely do not heel strike. It's not necessary, and you won't want to do it anyway because it will be painful. When you run on clean asphalt with proper form, it should be quite comfortable and you generally should not get blisters or excessive wear on your feet. If you start with half a mile to a mile max barefoot in the first week and gradually ...


6

Jim Wendler, a big strong weight lifter, says this: I believe [high schoolers] should be at least to do the following before they even lift weights; 50 push-ups with proper form (no A-Frame or saggy ass) 10 strict pull-ups 100 sit-ups 25 parallel dips Be able to hold various bridging positions for at least 30 seconds. Have some kind of ...


6

For the most part, the science is still unclear on the long term effects of things like long distance running on the body. Some studies have suggested that it can be bad for knee cartilage (in beginners), but goes on to say that their findings were likely not clinically relevant due to experimental error (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24045919). Other ...


5

Calf tenderness is a common occurrence with barefoot/minimalist running. The achilles is in the back of the leg, from the knee to the back of the heel. It is NOT a shock absorber, but is a stabilizing muscle and propulsing muscle. It works harder when one runs barefoot. Barefoot running is something that needs to be very gradually introduced into a ...


5

I actually run in vibrams, and when I first began my calves were extremely sore for the first week or two. I think this is due mostly to the fact barefoot running forces people to run as nature intended, on the ball of the foot, causing the calf to work harder in order to support the weight. This would also put more tension on the Achilles tendon since it ...


5

You should always breathe in through both your nose and mouth and out through your mouth. you cannot get enough of the needed oxygen only using your nose or mouth by itself. You should allow air to enter through both your mouth and nose when you're running. Your muscles need oxygen to keep moving and your nose simply can't deliver enough. Make sure ...


5

Minimalist running shoes are shown to increase cadence and decrease stride length. Decreased stride length - many heel strikers become forefoot strikers. This usually allows for more efficient pace because the leg lands under the body's center of gravity. It also means the big muscles are being used for propulsion and the small muscles aren't "braking" ...


5

If your doctor has recommended not running for a month, I would suggest not running for a month. Sure you can exercise now, but it will probably lengthen your recovery time and potentially aggravate your injury further. When in doubt, a doctor who has assessed you the internet. If you want a second opinion, try another doctor or a physiotherapist, but I ...


5

The best thing you could probably do would be to find a dedicated runner's shop. We've got one where I live and they are really specializing in running shoes. A good runner's shop should be able to do several things for you: There should be trained employees, who are themselves runners (or do sports at least) and know what they do. They can assess your ...


5

Long-distance running is a natural human activity and is not inherintly bad for your knees I can't find a decent journal article, but the general consensus is that running is not bad for your knees. It is theorised that endurance hunting (i.e running after an animal until it dies of exhaustion) was the first form of hunting of humans. Bad shoes lead to bad ...


5

Treadmill Video - Can be done on your own. Although imperfect, if you have access to a treadmill, you can set up your video camera and film your running form from the side, the back and the front if the treadmill doesn't block the view. I also think it helps to do both side views because there can be left -right differences. If you can hook your camera up ...


5

Yeah you should rarely, if ever, plan on adding more than 10% in either distance or speed per week as a general rule. More to the point of your question is whether you want to increase aerobic speed (how fast can you run 10k) or burst speed (how fast can you run < 1k). If the latter, then yes, bodyweight exercises like squats, one-legged squats, box ...


4

Your improvement makes complete sense. By switching to the Vibrams, you probably changed from a heel striker to a mid-foot striker. You've also traded the stability, cushioning, and restriction provided by the shoes for strength in your feet and legs. You are now stronger and have better form. If the shoes are the only variable you've changed and your ...


4

I will address this simply from the standpoint of increasing the amount of time you can run, but I do want to point out that there are other factors that may influence this, such as your nutrition, hydration, other workouts around the run, things of that nature. You are running approximately 30 minutes, 3x a week, for around 9-10 miles total distance. If ...


4

Nathan makes some amazing hydration products that are specialized for distance running. I found the Minimist to be the best of their camleback-like products. It only weight 6.5 oz when dry, holds 50oz of liquid and has enough pockets for fuel for a 4 hour run. The cavity that holds the bladder is a bit bigger than the bladder and you can use that space to ...


4

"Proper running form" is much more comprehensive than just the foot strike. Running with a fore/mid/heel strike are all valid IF you're not suffering as a result and the rest of your mechanics are sound. Focusing on foot strike alone will not yield a more efficient run. It is my opinion (after several years of running and trial and error) that getting your ...


4

I've personally never altered my diet for anything shorter than a marathon (my current half PR is 1:29). The purpose of increasing carbs for longer distances (runs longer than 2 hours) is to maximize glycogen stores. I would be skeptical that your body would actually need any extra stores for a run lasting less than 2 hours. A sensible diet of 60-70% carbs ...



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