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7

So you went for a long run for your current training level and felt tired for a few days afterwards? That would be expected and rather the point. You're trying to stress your body so that it will adapt to the stress and then some (supercompensation). This process means that you will be a bit tired. I'll note that some of the commenters wanted to calculate ...


6

With the exception of a track event, most everything else will have hills. I've heard hill repeats referred to as "speed work in disguise". What they have in common is rather than the steady-state output you can build up on the flats, you need the ability to generate a lot more output, and then recover quickly back to your steady-state maintainable race ...


5

The amount of milage your run every week is dependant on your age, fitness level, trail vs road, goals and finally the definition of "Run vs Jog". The hard part is that as humans we are all different and our bodies all react differently to training. Some people can run 60k or less and successfully "Run" an ultra. The other variable is how many races you ...


5

Nowadays, most training plans for Marathons, includes both lots of LSR and later a fair bit of speed work. The common idea is to first build up your ability to run long distances on fat and later add speed. As the first part will inevitably slow you pace a bit over time, the later part is needed to get the speed back into the run. E.g. the first 8-12 ...


5

Basic speed workouts have these benefits: Fast twitch muscle fiber recruitment: speed work is one of the only ways to recruit fast twitch muscle fibers. If you do sprint training, your body will learn how to recruit those muscle fibers for faster running in workouts and when finishing races. Puts a large amount of stress on the central nervous system: by ...


5

Both steady state and HIIT workouts (among others) are useful for running fitness. Each type of effort has its own purpose. HIIT stands for High Intensity Interval Training. HIIT methods are usually 10 - 60 seconds of very intense effort. In the running world, this is speedwork. While speedwork is important, it's only one part of getting to a high level of ...


5

Most of my answer is already contained in this answer, although the questions are not really duplicates. A couple things that I will reiterate: The biggest mistake that the vast majority of runners make is going too hard on their easy days, and not hard enough on their hard days. Speedwork is the icing on the cake, make sure you bake the cake first (i.e., ...


3

Running in a crowd is not necessarily dependent on having large muscle mass, but rather technique and being willing to stand your ground. Brent is right, the race isn't won in the first 800m, but it can be lost. I would assume that the coaches are doing drills and workouts to emphasize being able to near sprint out of the gate for position (400 - 800m work) ...


3

If you can't run 10k without stopping, then you are either running too far, or too fast for your current fitness. I would recommend a program created by a cross country coach named Barry Pollack, dubbed the 3:2:1 program. In this, you have 6 runs per week, 3 short, 2 medium and one long. Your medium run is double your short runs, and your long run is 3x ...


3

First, just thought I'd mention that it says when joining this stack exchange that questions should not be opinion based. That said, I usually hang mine on a fold up clothes hanger, or over a railing outside. If these aren't options, you could just rinse them in the sink or toss them in a fresh bucket of water.


3

There is a rule of thumb that anything below 80%HRMax is working within the aerobic zone, whereas above you are heading towards threshold and anaerobic zones (being able to sustain these harder efforts for less and less time). Personally, when training aerobically, I aim for roughly 75% and not higher, even when it comes to hills. There is thought within the ...


3

As Julii alludes to, "zones" are pretty much arbitrary, as you are burning fat as a fuel in all zones, just the percentage to which it contributes to the whole is different for different effort levels. As you get higher in intensity, the more you rely on stored carbohydrates (glucose), and the lower in intensity, the more you rely on fat. They are both still ...


3

No. There is a history of athletes training in sweat suits for weight loss, and in some very limited capacities it makes sense. As a fighter, you want to be as big and strong as possible for your weight class, but just barely in that weight class. As such, running around in a sweat suit is a good way to dump a few pounds of water if you're getting weighed ...


2

If you're interested in not carrying water or carrying smaller quantities, you could be creative with your running routes. Find a neighborhood, running track or path where you can park your car to retrieve water. By running short loops or out-and-back patterns, you can either simulate a race by getting water every two miles or, what I prefer, which is to ...


2

If you are looking for ways to increase your speed at a given distance, I would suggest running over distance. We raced 5k, so we ran anywhere from 1.5x to 4x that distance. If that is a problem for you (because of injuries or whatnot), look into other forms of cardio that are lower impact. Cycling, swimming, rowing come to mind. Keep in mind the injury ...


2

First, let's think about this in a more general sense (i.e. it's not a specific person that causes this problem). For example, when you haven't run for a couple days, and you pass a runner while you're driving, do you feel strangely jealous? Do thoughts go through your head such as "Ugh, I haven't run in two days. And look a this person trying to rub it in." ...


2

The sweat is not really causing the odor. Bacteria that begin to break down the oils and other items contained in the sweat are what cause the odors. Once these get embedded in the clothing (I've found synthetics to be particularly bad for this), then even heat can bring out the odor. What I generally do is take off my shoes, spray them with an antifungal/...


2

Everyone body behaves differently to temperature and humidity, but you can look at the "Heat Index" If the heat index is high enough then you know that you will have to adjust your pace for the race. For example: If you are running a Marathon at 90f and 90% humidity the heat index will be 122. If the temp is 80 and the humidity is 40% then the heat index is ...


2

Your "steady" pace will get faster : the aim is to run faster for a longer time. It also makes running "slow" easy in comparison. I ran my first half last year and only did 40-90 min steady runs for training. This year I included more intervals and hills, with one long run per week. I definitely feel faster on my long runs ! The important fact is that I ...


2

To answer your question directly, I'll point you to a previous question about incorporating running and strength training together. More broadly though, I think it's worth noting that the cross country coach at your local high school probably isn't a high level trainer putting people into the Olympics (or even an xc scholarship). If you want to make the ...


2

Training for a marathon is a hard and feeling tired is normal. However the more you train the better you will start to feel. I trained for my first marathon with 4 runs a week, but I did find that I was tired and I also got injured. This was mainly due to adding to much mileage too quickly. I am assuming that you were on week 3 (20k) of your plan and that ...


2

Looks like you don't have the strength to handle that weight. Most likely a better way to go about it would be starting with a basic strength program until your muscles are strong enough to deal with the load. Things like heavy squats and deadlifts (starting strength type of program), combined with unloaded running and uphill sprints. If you have access to ...


2

Progressing A treadmill is a very good place to gain stamina, but only 1km is very little. Suffice to say, if you want to complete a half marathon, you won't be running 1km per day, and then suddenly 21km on event day, right? If you run on a treadmill you have the luxury of setting a steady tempo for yourself, and seeing how far you can get at that tempo ...


2

After a break from a season of consistent mileage, you should run a week at lower mileage (if you were running an average of 45 minutes a day on easy runs, you might do 30 - 35 minutes a day your first week back with no long run), but then you can quickly pick it back up to your normal mileage. After that, you should continue following the 10% rule.


2

After a marathon or any race many people, I cant think of a solid reference - maybe Greg McMillan, suggest to do a reverse taper. Using McMillan's it would be 50% of normal (20 miles) for following week, 75% of normal for the next (30 miles), 80-90% for the third week, and back to normal from there. Alternatively, Hal Higdon relates a saying from some other ...


2

First you should make sure you are not over doing in in your training, but having said that if your long run is at 13 miles then yes you can do a Marathon in 15 weeks. Ideally you want 16-18 weeks for training, but if you are already running 13 miles in sub 2 hours you are in decent shape. You should look at a Marathon training plan with a goal of around 4 ...


2

I experienced the same problem and I might have figured out the answer: The heat is caused by friction. This friction is produced because your feet can move within your shoe...so my suggestion is get some thicker, breathable socks.


2

I suppose those are really good questions, because most the formulae just work on rules of thumb & probably we're all too individual for the formulae to work perfectly for everyone reliably. But the question makes me wonder if the whole idea of zones is just a bit hokey, since the transition points are probably not fixed even for individuals; probably ...


2

Your body adapts to whatever you are doing. If your job involves cutting up vegetables then your mind learns the movements required and over time improves the speed and efficiency with which you can complete the task until it becomes a subconscious level of response. This is discussed in "What is Reality" in reasonable detail and in this interview with a cup ...


2

Bike and running both use the leg muscles. They don't focus on "different" muscles, it's the same muscles producing the same type of motion with a different emphasis on where the power is placed. Can you improve one by doing the other? It depends. If you are at the low end of the scale (just starting, getting back into shape, etc) then yes, running can help ...



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