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No. There is a history of athletes training in sweat suits for weight loss, and in some very limited capacities it makes sense. As a fighter, you want to be as big and strong as possible for your weight class, but just barely in that weight class. As such, running around in a sweat suit is a good way to dump a few pounds of water if you're getting weighed ...


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As user19362 said, choice of clothing is very important when you are exercising. By wearing a jacket when the temperatures are elevated, your body will not dissipate heat as efficiently as it would if you were not wearing a jacket (sweating cools the body via evaporation, and you will be trapping the moisture under your jacket). This is not a good means for ...


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Our feet absorb more force during running as compare to other body parts.So you should give extra care to your feet because foot is the most frequently injured part of the body.Proper shoe selection should be there, once you purchase right shoes then you need to maintain them and replace them when they are worn out.


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Tie your shoes with Runners Knot , if friction is the reason, friction as with movement of feet in shoes.It will keep your feet stable inside shoe.


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As Julii alludes to, "zones" are pretty much arbitrary, as you are burning fat as a fuel in all zones, just the percentage to which it contributes to the whole is different for different effort levels. As you get higher in intensity, the more you rely on stored carbohydrates (glucose), and the lower in intensity, the more you rely on fat. They are both still ...


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There is a rule of thumb that anything below 80%HRMax is working within the aerobic zone, whereas above you are heading towards threshold and anaerobic zones (being able to sustain these harder efforts for less and less time). Personally, when training aerobically, I aim for roughly 75% and not higher, even when it comes to hills. There is thought within the ...


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I suppose those are really good questions, because most the formulae just work on rules of thumb & probably we're all too individual for the formulae to work perfectly for everyone reliably. But the question makes me wonder if the whole idea of zones is just a bit hokey, since the transition points are probably not fixed even for individuals; probably ...


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After a marathon or any race many people, I cant think of a solid reference - maybe Greg McMillan, suggest to do a reverse taper. Using McMillan's it would be 50% of normal (20 miles) for following week, 75% of normal for the next (30 miles), 80-90% for the third week, and back to normal from there. Alternatively, Hal Higdon relates a saying from some other ...


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Pay attention to if your feet are rubbing or not, I find the socks I use make the difference. I tried some short basic cotton socks and my feet get very hot. Then I got some puma socks that are meant for running and breathe a lot (my shoes also breathe pretty well) and I noticed a major difference. Make sure your shoes are good for your feet. I'm not ...


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I experienced the same problem and I might have figured out the answer: The heat is caused by friction. This friction is produced because your feet can move within your shoe...so my suggestion is get some thicker, breathable socks.



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