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You often see people looking at the bottom of a running shoe to see if it needs replacing, for example by seeing whether it has much “tread” left. This is not the right test of whether a shoe is finished: the main determinant of the longevity of a shoe is not the extent of wear to the outer sole, it is the compression of the mid-sole, which is the spongy ...


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Have you seen cyclists? They generally have legs that are much larger than their upper bodies, especially those that do time trials. So, I don't recommend cycling if your goal is to prevent thicker legs. What's going on here is almost entirely genetic and won't be significantly affected by controlling diet. My advice is to focus on upper body compound ...


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In addition to the answers already received, I would suggest you to do weight training for your legs in the gym. It develops mitochondria in your muscle cells, which play important role in (up)hill running.


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I am no expert, @Michał, so you are warned in advance. I have three remarks: You could consider a threadmill. This will give you any desired angle, your muscles may get proper training. Running up and down the staircase should be good too, certainly, but it wouldn't position your foot the way a steep road would. Running the staircase should be helpful ...


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So that's: ~50 miles. 3.8 mph (50/3.8 = 13.2) or 16 minutes/mile 792 minutes (13.2 * 60) = 4,391 calories (for a 170lb average person) Honey generally has 21 calories per 5ml, so that's 3 calories per ml. 4,391 (total calories) / 3 (calories per ml) = 1,463 ml. Feel free to double check my math on all of that, and it's based entirely on the average of a ...


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Many trail races have un-runnable hills (except for elites - and even for them. Ellie Greenwood (WS100 course record holder, current Comrades champ, etc.) is known for a spectactularly fast speed hiking style. Like most things in running it's down to what works for you. I would consider keeping upright so that your lungs get maximum air. You lean into the ...


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Part of the difference that you are noting is genetic; some people are naturally better at aerobic sports, and some are better at putting muscle on. In running for example, you don't see sprinters become marathoners, nor do you see marathoners become sprinters, no matter how hard they train. They don't have the genetics for it. For a given person, however, ...


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If you're talking about entering ketosis via a ketogenic diet that's pretty interesting that you felt problems lasting for weeks. Most research I've seen, and my own experience, shows ketones consumption happening ~48 hours after carbohydrate restriction. I'm sure there's a huge variety in there, but 7 weeks seems excessively long. In this 2004 study that ...



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