Hot answers tagged

6

I think you should ask yourself exactly what you're looking to accomplish. If you want to run a 10K in under half an hour, that's a whole different ball of wax than wanting to run a competitive time for your age, which is different than just finishing it without walking. They're all "running a 10K", but the training is a lot different. There's no right or ...


5

For running, you will see the best results from a consistent program, and shorter + more often is usually better than longer and less often. To start, I would look at many of the couch to 5k programs, and use that until you can comfortably run a 5k. Once you get to that point, you can start a regular running program to get you to where you need to be for ...


4

4 weeks before an Iron man - I wouldn't try anything new. You are probably going in a taper in 2 weeks, and you should already be at the peak and ready for the race. Yes, Gels are a personal (and some medical) choices, but just continue with what got you through the half, and you'll do just great. There are Gels, Gums, powders, pills (and probably 20 ...


4

To keep going for long time periods, you need to stay hydrated and to take in calories, primarily in the form of carbohydrate, and salt, to replace what you have sweated out. You can generally absorb somewhere around 250-350 calories per hour while you are exercising, and if you are working hard, you can sweat a liter an hour, or more if it is hot. I ...


2

Basically, unless you know more or less exactly how many calories you're gonna burn daily, you will lose some muscle. Obviously, if you have a good estimate of how much you will burn, try to eat over this amount + your bodyweight in lbs x 15 (which is the amount of calories required for bodyweight maintenance for an average male) in calories. I will discuss, ...


1

Honestly, you won't lose your muscles in 15 days, that is too short. I know that hiking can be tyring sometimes (I live near the alps and hike often), but that is not enough to really lose muscles. Last year I spent one month in South America, at high altitudes (+3500m), most of the time hiking, I did not lose any muscles (but I burned fat, that was cool!). ...


1

Start by running shorter distances and work your way up. Push yourself to run the whole distance even if you are jogging at a super slow pace (obviously don't push yourself if you begin to feel pain). If you want a little more structure, you can google for "8k training plan" or "half marathon training plan" ect. depending on the race. What's nice about ...


1

Gradually moving towards barefooting and minimalist shoes (xero shoes, vivobarefoot, vibram five fingers) solved the issue for me. If you search the web about this, you will find very controversial information. Some sources point at going barefoot as a cause of plantar fasciitis, other ones state that it helps solving it, by reinforcing the feet muscles ...


1

Depending on how much your gait is off, you will require that much support. If its only minor and you usually walk, then you dont have any serious concerns, but if you are having discomfort or you jog often, then you need to buy a shoe specifically designed for your gait. In fact i have the same issue with a slight gait and i often run and sprint too. I ...


1

Most weight gained during longer runs is water weight - fun fact you're more likely to drink too much water during a long-distance run than not enough. (It's Wikipedia, but it's got a lot of good sources.) A quick search shows that Kilian Jornet competes in Ultramarathons of 100+ km where maintaining adequate nutrition is difficult mainly for logistic ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible