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12

You don't need to just strengthen your lower back. You are having lower back spasms and difficulties but it's not because your lower back is weak. It's because of systemic issue directly related to your sedentary lifestyle. As such no 'band-aid' solution will help, instead you need a comprehensive overhaul. What you probably suffer from Muscle ...


7

A couple exercises helped me with lower back weakness. In my warm-ups and morning workouts, I did these: Cat-cows from yoga, to get blood flowing in the lower back and to get used to firing those muscles. I did a set of 10 immediately after my warm-up. Round-backed deadlifts with very, very low weight, performed slowly with a distinct pause at the top and ...


6

Squats are probably the most common and are a very effective leg exercise. There are a lot more options that are available to you depending on your weight set and any available equipment. For a good increase in raw leg strength, you can also do Chair Jumps. Get a (solid, stable) chair, and standing 6" away from it, jump up onto it and back down. This ...


5

You might want to shorten your running distance, but increase your speed. Long jogging sessions can cause wear & tear on the body. And especially if you're not giving your body enough rest in between this could be making your back worse. I used to run 3 miles every day, and although my endurance was great, I was living with pain every day. Much later ...


4

My son asked me to take a look at this question. I'm a second-generation phlebologist, myself the son of the man who coined the word "Sclerotherapy" (=injection treatment of varicose veins) in 1939, and who founded the organization currently called the "American College of Phlebology" (it started as the "Phlebology Society of America", which I ran for about ...


4

There are a couple body weight exercises that can help your Glutes and Iliopsas. Unfortunately for one of them you still need some equipment. Iliopsas: Situps (can be performed weighted) Front kicks/Round house kicks (only perform body weight, and do both) Glutes: Squats (can be performed body weight or weighted with dumbbells or barbells) Side kicks ...


3

Squat (back squat, front squat, overhead squat) Deadlift Clean & jerk Snatch Lunge Step-up


3

You're question lacks a little bit of detail about what your workouts looked like, but general causes for exercise related lower leg injuries are: Running too fast, puts massive strain of the soft tissue around your shin bone. The only way to cope with this is slowly built up your exercise to allow the tissue to strengthen. Run at a speed that you're still ...


2

Strength is built and demonstrated with intense exercise. In this context, "intense" means "it is increasingly difficult to do repeatedly". An intense squat for someone would be a weight they could only squat two or three times--or only once--before failing. Intensity is inversely related to duration. If I can do something five hundred times, then by ...


2

Bikes are definitely not a substitute for squats The motions are vaguely similar and workout out many of the same muscles but biking is cardio and squats are for improving strength. You might be the best biker in the word but that doesn't mean you can automatically come out and squat 400 pounds. Another thing to keep in mind is the squat is a more full ...


1

Just because the session is short does not mean you can't get anything done. There are massive challenges in programming for a post recovery surgery, and I honestly think you would be far better served from seeking physical therapy from a professional that works with athletes. We don't know enough about your particular case to comment safely, and not being ...


1

If you're going to exercise while recovering from a heavy surgery, first get your doctors to sign off on EVERY exercise you plan to do. All that being said, this should be a time of rest and recovery for you. Focus your efforts on recovery, healthy eating, and maybe start a hobby to pass the time, maybe even spend the time reading books on fitness and ...


1

All recovery is shared All training takes a toll from all other training. This can be minimized by working separate parts of the body or separate metabolic pathways, but in the end your ability to recover from any workout is shared across all workouts, all you eat, all your stress, all your sleep. Running and arms work sounds fine That said, if you're ...


1

The only effect I have seen is sometimes my arms or shoulders will get sore while I run. This all depends on how hard you go with both running and arm work. I don't think working out your arms will HELP running in any way if that's part of your question whether it have an "effect". Although if you do find your arms ever getting tired during runs, ...


1

As long as you eat sufficient calories, your running workouts and push-ups will not interfere with each other.


1

I'm a ski instructor who is working on similar things. I picked up a copy of "Total Skiing" by Chris Fellows, and it has a lot of useful information. Specifically, it has a set of evaluations for physical strength and balance, and then a set of exercises to work on for each of the areas.


1

Hip thrusts Best for glutes and some hamstring involvement, this movement works on a horizontal plane. Cable standing leg raise Great r.o.m. for hip flexors, can also be done with ankle weights, rubber band or rubber tubing this also works on a horizontal plane. These two exercises are a great start to strengthening key muscles for the 100/200 meter ...



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