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16

Whether or not it is necessary to wait an hour depends on you, actually. Some people can drink a lot and go run, some people can't. However, unless you are chronically dehydrated or exercising in extreme weather conditions, you won't need water for most of your runs. You should be getting most of your hydration from your diet during the course of the day, ...


9

Two main tips (note that I used to run in Wellington, NZ which is famed for both its hills and its wind). Firstly, a headwind is basically a hill you can't see - treat it that way. Techniques like small, quick steps to preserve momentum are most useful. Secondly, for a sufficiently strong wind you can draft off people. Tuck in behind someone in front and ...


8

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From ...


7

Mens muscles are stronger. That's the biggest factor. They have stronger muscles, denser bones, mostly related to the effects of testosterone. Women are slower than men by an average of around 10% across all distances. You can see examples of this split, look at junior and young categories for many sports, and women are just as competitive as men (or ...


6

Especially in running, I am a firm believer in "If it isn't broken, don't fix it". The whole movement of Chi/Pose and extreme minimalist shoes has grown out of a misconception and bad application of "heel striking". Heel striking does not mean that your heel touches first, it has to do with where your foot is when the majority of your weight falls on it. ...


6

In both cases West-to-East and East-to-West jet lag does apply (not north and south / south and north). Basically your body and brain are completely out of sync due to the departure time and arrival time when travelling through different time zones. I strongly suggest arriving a few days (atleast 3, some people prefer 1 week) earlier before your marathon. ...


6

For the most part, the science is still unclear on the long term effects of things like long distance running on the body. Some studies have suggested that it can be bad for knee cartilage (in beginners), but goes on to say that their findings were likely not clinically relevant due to experimental error (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24045919). Other ...


5

It sounds like you're off to a great start with minimalist shoes. The first rule is to start slow and increase usage gradually, and you have done so. The shoes Make sure the shoes fit perfectly. You can get blisters and pain in minimalist shoes pretty easily, especially on long runs, if they don't fit perfectly or you're not wearing them correctly. Also, ...


4

"Proper running form" is much more comprehensive than just the foot strike. Running with a fore/mid/heel strike are all valid IF you're not suffering as a result and the rest of your mechanics are sound. Focusing on foot strike alone will not yield a more efficient run. It is my opinion (after several years of running and trial and error) that getting your ...


4

Interesting conversation and results. I like to use what is known as the Yasso 800 method named after Bart Yasso. Instead of using your half marathon time, base it off of repeated 800 meter efforts. To test, run a series of 800 meter controlled efforts with ~400 meter jog in between. The average time in minutes and seconds of your 800s will be your ...


4

I think breaking 3 hours or better for a marathon or 1.20 for half is very unlikely on training just at the weekends. Of course it depends on your starting point, and if you do lots of other cardio work during the week. Even if you are extremely talented, you still have to train to get the good results. I know many people who run sub 3 hour marathons, and ...


3

Your questions suggest to me that you have not done major distance on an elliptical machine (or the road) before. Therefore, I strongly recommend that you treat this like a road marathon and follow all the normal advice for that e.g. if you can do 10km now then a 4 month programme will have you in shape to complete this. Clothing, nutrition and hydration: ...


3

Stick with whatever routines you have used to for your LSR/long-distance training! You know it works. "If it ain't broke..." It is a very, very common mistake to overdo all the preparations for the first marathon... usually with less-than-optimal results. I did that as well for my first marathon: Eating a lot more pasta than usual (almost the double than ...


3

My first marathon was 4 months ago. I did not worry about what I read on the Internet, but rather made sure that I felt good. Above all, I tried not to mess with my eating routine. I was much more afraid of upsetting my stomach than of running low on carbs. I even had a glass of wine the evening before because, well, I liked to. Granted, I did eat lots of ...


3

I have had the exact same problem for the last year or so, but I have gotten around the problem by tying my shoes in a slight different manner (see below). From the various expects I consulted when I encounted the problem, I understand, that it usually is one of two problems for my age-group (47): a stress fracture in the foot or a inflammation of the ...


3

If you want to win a 5k, walking is a great start, but will probably not get you there on its own. Fast walking will help you build a strong base level of aerobic fitness. Your heart and lungs will develop and improve your capacity for running. After you build this base, your cardiovascular system needs to learn to function efficiently as you approach (or ...


3

In my opinion the furthest I would go in training pre marathon is about 22 miles. And I would only do 1 of these. The rest of the long runs I would suggest should be between 18-20 miles. The reason I say this, is that running the full 26 miles takes a lot out of you, and I think would have a negative affect on the actual marathon rather than a positive. ...


2

You don't really need to follow a specific plan, make up your own. With a 1:31 HM, you've already got pretty decent speed. One of the better "programs" I've seen is from a guy named BarryP on the slowtwitch forums, it's called 3:2:1. Basically, you do 3 short runs, two medium and one long. Each one is double the previous run. So, if your short run is 40 ...


2

Night sweats can be related to an increase in exercise intensity due to the affect of exercise on the endocrine glands and hormone secreations. In general, excessive sweating at night is caused by hormones. That is why menopausal women are prone to night sweats. However, there are also several other causes, including medical or medication causes so night ...


2

To add to the two previous answers alerady... Hydration as a WHOLE needs to be addressed more so than the hydration one understakes right before running. One should be adaquately hydrated in general. You do dehydrate as you sleep though through breathing (especially in the winter when the air can be dry) and sweat. You could also drink a less amount of ...


2

I don't mean this so much as a definitive answer so much an anecdotal one. A few years ago I discovered that my morning run times were measurably better, and I FELT much better, if I drank a whole liter of water right before bed. I continue to do this when I plan on running the following morning.


2

No. Marathons are significantly harder than halves and you will need to get your long run up to around 32km in order to complete. You mention that there is a couple of months in between. This would give you enough time.


2

Generally speaking, for running you should never wear cotton. Once it gets wet it chafes and that hurts. Options: Wear nothing under your shorts. Most shorts have a liner that may be perfectly sufficient. Wear short running tights. This is mostly for chafing to prevent the skin of the thighs rubbing together. You don't need to wear anything underneath. ...


2

This article does, in a long way, answer your question: The Marathon Myth: High intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T.) vs. Long Duration Training (L.D.T.) I have written several FitBit Articles this year detailing the efficacy of High Intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T. training). H.I.I.T. has been shown to develop much higher levels of ...


2

I ran long distances for two years in minimalist shoes, and have just now realized that yes, minimalist shoes are great for improving your form and reducing injury, but they still mask just enough of your senses to make it harder to perfect your form—specifically, running efficiently with as little impact as possible. Also, minimalist shoes need to fit quite ...


2

There's no universal cap on barefoot running. People do ultramarathons barefoot, and marathons that are entirely on asphalt. But pretty much any source on barefoot/minimalist running advice is going to tell you to ease into it to build up the strength in your feet. If doing more than 10k causes you pain, listen to your body and keep it to shorter runs for ...


2

I'm going to restructure your question a little bit to help you understand what's going on: Is it normal for mass to increase substantially going from marathon training to a hypertrophy based resistance training? The short answer is: yes. The longer answer has to do with the specific adaptations your body is going through in response to the training. ...


2

It very much depends on how long you have been running, but for someone who has been running a number of years. Yes I'd agree that early to mid 30's you are likely to see your best performances regarding the marathon. However, you do hear very good performances even in to later 30's. As I said, it very much depends on your running background.


2

Human's physical performances usually peak in their prime; this age can range from 18 till 35+. So, biologically speaking, our physical performance best will be a number between that range. However, just like many things in human life, we improve the more we practise and gain experience. As a result, the optimal age doesn't really matter. What matters is ...


2

There are a couple of things I would look at. Firstly, are your trainers suitable for running? If you are running in walking shoes it maybe worth investing in a pair of running trainers, as it maybe ths that this is the cause of the lower leg problem. Go to a proper running shop and they will help you choose the right pair for you. Once that is sorted, I'd ...



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