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12

Why it won't work Martial arts are highly skill-oriented and require significant feedback from an instructor, as well as copious amounts of sparring (either with striking, such as boxing and Muay Thai, or with wrestling, such as judo, Brazilian jiu-jitsu or wrestling). "Learning" a martial art without those two key components is almost always a fruitless ...


7

Body weight squats will help with leg strength and balance. Bicycle crunches and situps for oblique and core. Pushups or elevated pushups for triceps. I would avoid excessive bicep curls as big biceps will decrease your punching speed.


7

For those that are not aware, Dollyo Chagi is a roundhouse kick, and Yop Chagi is a side kick. Flexibility is key for Tae Kwon Do (TKD), as the style heavily favors kicking, and especially for World Taekwondo Federation type sparring (Olympics) it is the major scoring technique. Very little scoring in WTF is done with hand techniques. From the description ...


6

Back bridges (where you go into a bridge, lower yourself to about 20 cm above the ground, then raise yourself back into a full bridge – think an upsidedown pushup) are excellent for strengthening your back, which will improve your mobility on the ground; very useful for a grappling-based martial art. Developing your hand strength with grip trainers (e.g. ...


6

I've been in the martial arts (Isshinyu Karate) for 25+ years and I have to agree, depending on what if any martial arts training you have, the best and most effective way is learning with a skilled instructor. HOWEVER - there are many things you can do while saving up to prepare yourself: get a heavy bag - nothing teaches you how to punch hard like a ...


6

Looking at your numbers, strength is not an issue if you are a local/regional level player, you are all set. It looks like your biggest problem is the lack of mat time. 1 to 4 sessions a week is not enough and no amount of weight lifting is going to change that. 4 sessions a week is a minimum if you compete locally and you should be putting some serious ...


6

It seems like you have already been doing most of the high intensity interval training with BJJ and Muay Thai, and that is one great way to get rid of your belly fat. However, here are some rules to remember when it comes to losing belly fat and gaining muscle mass at the same time: Watch your diet closely - make sure to cut out as much sugary foods as ...


5

Sure...? It could work if you have phenomenal recovery. If you've been doing an hour or two 6 days a week for a while and feel OK, feel free to add a third hour. If you're starting from zero, or from just MMA, or from four days a week training, I doubt your plan will work unless you build up to it very, very gradually. Some Concerns About Your Plan You ...


5

Clap push-ups In this exercise you assume the push-up position, then performs a push-up in an explosive manner, launching your upper body off the ground to a height where the participant has time to clap their hands together then place their hands back on the ground in the original start position. In this exercise the participant continues to perform ...


5

My sensei has always taught me that speed and power are in the technique. If you get the technique down, the rest will come. He also taught me that all my power comes from the core--or body. Both your punches and your kicks originate in your hips, and the rest of your muscles support it. That's how you can generate enough power to break a board only 3" ...


5

First - don't focus on single muscles - muscles do not work independent from each other. A punch is a combination of shoulder, lats, delts (I don't think biceps really come into play-at least in a major way). The biggest inhibitor to speed is muscle tension, if you feel yourself tensing while delivery, you're slowing yourself down. Plyometric pushups ...


5

Don't underestimate the importance of just exercising your technique for increasing speed. Often the problem is not so much how fast can you throw your hand forward, but how fast can you do it correctly, with the proper rhythm, form etc. That's what makes a correct quick punch difficult to do. It's not so much the muscle contraction, it's that there are many ...


5

This is a question only you can answer for yourself. Actually, all three of your scenarios are correct. If you train too much you will stop gaining and it will take longer to heal. If you do too much in one session you have a higher risk of injury and you will probably get burnt out. Personally, I do martial arts on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday and weight ...


5

I strongly recommend adding yoga to your home exercise routine. It seems to help me recovery from muscle soreness faster. Additionally, it really helps me keep still in between kata moves (not sure which style you do). Personally, I haven't seen much flexibility improvements from it, but I know of others who have seen a difference.


5

One of the first rule of training periodisation is that to maintain your gains during a recovery phase, you need to keep the intensity level high. So you can reduce the frequency or the overall load but keep the intensity high during your workout. Keeping your strength training workout once a week will allow you to maintain your strength level without ...


4

All depends on where your weak points are....are you out of energy? focus on Tabata type of training. If you're not explosive enough then plyometric. If it's strength (and you have no weights/equipment at home) - pullups, pushups, dips, squats and situps...... My real recommendation - ask your teacher/trainer what areas you need to focus on (and he might ...


4

Don't forget that your body needs time to recover. A challenging strength training session will require 48 hours rest for the muscles to be fully recovered--and sometimes longer. However, it is possible to mix cardio and weight training. I personally follow this format 3x/week: Weight training first Cardio second Katas third (you have to be able to ...


4

The serratus anterior is the muscle directly responsible for punching. Wikipedia: The serratus anterior is occasionally called the "big swing muscle" or "boxer's muscle" because it is largely responsible for the protraction of the scapula — that is, the pulling of the scapula forward and around the rib cage that occurs when someone throws ...


4

Most people who are trying to gain weight have no issue with fat. That's a good thing, because the only thing that will help you gain is to eat a lot of food. To keep the weight on, you need to turn that food into muscle, which requires the right type of work to build that muscle. In short, the quickest way to build muscle is to lift heavy things. Those ...


4

You have two main questions: Gaining weight Being able to gain (or lose) weight is a matter of intake to output - simple, right? The output (burn) consists of your activity level including how your metabolism actually works. Each person's metabolism is different and can change based on age, genetics, etc. By eating 6 times a day, you are probably ...


4

These guys are in the Swedish national team in Shorinji Kempo. They compete in Embu (sort of form) In this video they won the European competition. They are now practicing for the world championship next year. They only do exercises for speed. They want to be faster since the Japanese are smaller and faster then they are. They do thrusters at about 60% of ...


4

Anderson Silva, who is what one could conservatively call one of the most successful counter-punchers in modern mixed martial arts, includes two elements in his training that I would say are vital to that success: Copious sparring, focusing on technique and defense Dodging a racquetball thrown at his head Other than footwork drills for agility, ...


4

Ok, given your program and what you would like to do (Along with the upper body restrictions), here's what I would recommend. Conditioning - I would concentrate on HIIT training for your lunch sessions, with an emphasis on agility and footwork drills. Leave the heavy lifting stuff for your lifting/mobility sessions. This will have the double effect of ...


4

Judoka do not have as high V02max as other sports like bicycling, rowing. In this study LEVELS OF ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC CAPACITY INDICES AND RESULTS FOR THE SPECIAL FITNESS TEST IN JUDO COMPETITORS. They have measured good judoka. They seem to be around 52 ml/kg/min . I think you can reach that in if your not already there in 45 days with Intervall/HIIT etc. ...


4

A good place to start looking is ExRx's list of stretches per muscle. Generally, whenever you feel that a muscle is not flexible enough for your goals (what you described as "tension"), you should try to make that muscle more flexible. For the kicks you mentioned, it seems to me that hip adductors and hamstrings would be the muscles involved, but I never ...


4

Losing fat and maintaining weight implies building muscle. Building muscle and losing fat at the same time is difficult, although there is the phenomenon that sometimes works for novices. The only thing you can do is keep on overloading your muscles in order to signal your body not to use muscle protein as an energy source eat enough protein For advanced ...


4

What you're addressing is also known as cortical remodeling. The human body is constantly recycling bone, at the rate of about 10% replacement per year. Impact and load bearing sports (Soccer, martial arts, weightlifting, running, etc.) are known to help retain bone mass density (BMD), while non weight bearing sports (swimming, cycling) do not have the ...


3

I have three things that I changed about my diet when I started training in martial arts: Drink more water. I drink a gallon a day. You'd be surprised how much you sweat while working out. Have you ever weighed yourself before and after a heavy leg day for example? Take a fish oil or other omega-3 fatty acid supplement. Once you get into training kicking ...


3

Another good way to increase speed is to do whatever sequence of punching/striking moves you normally do with hand weights, slowly. Remove weights and do it as fast as you can. Hand weights back on, slow. Off, quick. Do that three times and you'll be amazed at the change. Note: We did this in my martial arts class yesterday, and it made a dramatic ...


3

The most effective way to train for martial arts is to do it daily. I assume you have forms of some sort? By practicing those forms daily, you will increase your ability to do them correctly as well as to do it longer. This will help you with the type of cardio you need to do SAMBO. In addition, strength training does help. It's supplementary so it's OK ...



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