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13

It depends. With ibuprofen in particular, the anti-inflammatory properties are beneficial. Initially inflammation is important for healing an injury, but too much inflammation is detrimental. Based on that I prefer to take ibuprofen if the inflammation persists, but not immediately after getting the injury. Pain killers can also indirectly contribute to ...


6

Taking ibuprofen or other NSAIDs (anti-inflammatories that reduce pain and swelling) before for exercise can mask pain. Pain can be a warning sign to stop an exercise to prevent joint or soft tissue damage. Therefore, if you take it before exercise, you risk aggravating a problem.* However, if you have painful joints that prevent you from exercising, ...


6

Well, it's not outdated to be sure. I'm an Exercise Science major at Ball State U and I hear that you should not sit down immediately after intense exercise. I'm not exactly sure of the mechanism but if I remember right, it is because of the way venous blood returns to the heart. Muscle contraction is a large mover of blood back to the heart by pushing blood ...


5

The general idea behind the rule of "don't sit after working out" (and I am not a medical expert - I don't know how valid this is) is that if you go from an intense workout to just sitting and not moving at all, blood will start to pool in the lower areas of your body. This will later cause muscle pain and extra stress to the body. In my mind, this at least ...


3

I don't know about blood pooling or all that jibber-jabber. I do know that if I sit down right after sprints, barbell squats, deadlifts, kettlebell work, or judo, then my back and hamstrings will (without fail) get tight, lose flexibility, and possibly cramp up. I do not know the method, but I can vouch for the phenomenon.


2

Long-term use of any type of constipation treatment (suppositories/laxatives) can be detrimental because they reduce the amount of nutrients absorbed by the body. One recommendation to counteract constipation is to increase the amount of fiber in your diet. Naturally occurring fiber is best - fruits, whole grains, vegetables, etc - while chemically ...


1

You better consult a specialized doctor to answer your question. I am not a doctor. However, I also have PFPS. If you can read German, read this recent article. p 18-22. One of the closing sentences: "Ein umfassendes physiotherapeutisches Therapiekonzept setzt eine sorgfältige muskuläre Funktionsanalyse voraus." Translation: "For a comprehensive ...


1

If it's low-intensity, the workout won't have any relevant effects on the blood test. Even if it was a high-intensity workout, the test results might be influenced by it, but probably not to the extent that you'd get a false positive of any abnormal indication. There are countless other factors which influence these tests, such as time of day, amount of ...


1

I've also found that if I sit immediately after a session of long, intense cardio, I can experience a brief bout of low blood pressure (I.e., my vision narrows and I almost black out). I used to experience this when I was doing road cycling and / or mountain biking. If l rode really hard, then stopped and lay down in the grass, I'd feel the above symptoms ...



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