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4

I may be misunderstanding your question, but it seems that what you are asking for, would depend greatly on your goals and many other factors. “Optimal normal overall body flexibility” varies depending on age, gender, health, body type/size, level of activity and functional needs. There are many variables. For example, flexibility goals for the hamstrings ...


4

It really isn't that big of a concern. The biggest difference in stress on the back is that the shoulders are hit slightly differently. The overhand grip spreads the weight of the bar across the whole shoulder, and the suppinated grip hits between the spine and shoulder blade. So yes, there is a slight imbalance. But a big part of it is just like your ...


3

There are several things you can do, just know that in a raw squat (no squat suit or compression briefs) the glute involvement is primarily at the bottom, and the hamstrings are only moderately used. With a squat suit, the leverages change and loading the hamstrings is more important. That said, the glute and hamstring activity is still ...


3

To start, if you notice that you feel pain rather than a burn or soreness in your hamstrings, it may have to do with your squat stance, rather than lagging hamstrings. However, the hamstrings are more often underdeveloped compared to their quad counterparts found in front of them for most trainee's, so a muscle imbalance isn't out of the question. And while ...


3

I'm willing to bet you don't do single leg work at all. It's not fun, but it is necessary to deal with things like this. Single leg work that supports squats include things like the following: Split squats Lunges Single leg press Bulgarian split squats (one leg elevated on a bench) Pistols You'll want to do as many reps as you can with the strong leg, ...


3

I think you are over-thinking things too much. Yes, it's important to have equilibrium in your exercise, but understand the purpose: It is to make sure your joints stay in proper alignment when at rest. The weight I use for my rows is much lighter than my bench press. I make up for that fact by doing more reps with the rows than I do with the bench. ...


3

Seems like too many comments and not enough answers! You need to do backstroke along with freestyle, because: Backstroke covers certain muscles a lot better than freestyle, and Gym can't perfectly replicate backstroke swim time. If you're going to swim as much as you do, you may as well get comfortable with a second stroke. Doing different swimming ...


3

I notice two omission from the previous well articulated answers: 2 major imbalances in muay thai are: 1) Muay thai is not a seasonal sport like wrestling or baseball -- so there is a time imbalance. There is no off-season, thus no extended unloading phase...there is not a dedicated time to do the basic strength training that @Dave recommends. Often, ...


3

You can kind of answer your own question, with a little basic knowledge of anatomy and the mechanics of Muay Thai. The best way is to break each movement down into their component muscle groups. Feet/Calves/Shins - I group these together as many of the tendons and muscles for both run through the same area. The calves and other extensors are used to ...


2

The short answer is that you find someone who specializes in analyzing static and dynamic postures and movements and have them give you program to follow to correct any areas of dysfunction. The more information and knowledge that you have, the more able you will be to find the practitioner that can meet your needs. Here are some ideas: Physical Therapy ...


2

Since your question gives the impression that you are at least a somewhat experienced person when it comes to exercising and working out, then there are two possibilities that suggest themselves. Improper form - You've got something in your lifting form that is wrong so you get an imbalance in how the muscles are being used. It's either learned or your ...


2

I'd say Cable Rows, Bent Over Rows, or Pull-ups.


2

No exercises will automatically improve imbalances. It is important to work on the specific imbalance one might have. For instance, if someone is kyphotic they should certainly put more of an emphasis on rowing type movements to improve the strength of the back muscles. Doing the same amount of pushing and pulling work will not yield any change in the ...


2

I tend to descend to the left a little bit as well. Conscious effort to fix the form in a complex movement and then adding weight on top of that will probably not help the problem. I personally have found that too much conscious effort can be effective if you know for sure that you are hitting the right muscle groups because it forces them to work harder ...


2

Consider what sort of exercise you're doing by using the car. Unless you have a considerably different car than usual, it's a combination of pushing at relatively low intensity and maintaining your leg at a fully extended or mostly extended position (I personally found that, more often than not, holding the leg hovering in readiness was as much a part of the ...


1

Hypertrophy (muscle building) through yoga is definitely unorthodox, but with a well thought out plan and an appropriate diet, it's certainly possible (to a degree). I recently heard a Ben Greenfield podcast on the subject. He had a dude on there touting his methods. I haven't gotten into it myself, but here's his youtube channel... looks like he has ...


1

I agree with Sean Duggan in that I don't think you should worry about it too much. When you are not driving, both of your legs are working pretty hard and evenly carrying your body around every day with your day-to-day activities. If you are concerned and self-conscious though (and we don't want you to be!), you could certainly consider going to the gym! I ...


1

If you are at a stop light or a traffic jam, put the car in neutral and then release the clutch. The car won't stall, your leg won't get so tired, and it saves wear and tear on the clutch (don't forget to either set the parking brake or keep your foot on the brake, though, to keep from rolling).


1

There is more than one type of grip training available, and you want to make sure you select the right one: Pinch grip (plate pinches, etc.) Crushing grip (tennis ball, "captain's of crush") Supportive grip (deadlifts, farmer's walks) Since your stated goal is to handle more weight on deadlifts, you want to make sure you train your supportive grip. I ...


1

I assume you use regular grip rather than mix grip because otherwise you would just be doing mixed grip in whatever direction made you stronger. Just keep working it. If you're nearly failing in the left hand, but holding steadily with the right, it means your left hand is working harder and should thus catch up eventually. I don't think there's anyone who ...


1

The symmetry problem impacts a lot of people. Anyone who has an injury generally only has it on one side of their body (a torn ACL in the right knee, a torn rotator on the left from a couple of years ago, etc). So a lot of standard training paradigms apply to you, as you noted in your question. Barbells are fantastic strength training tools, arguably the ...


1

Whatever imbalances or omissions muay Thai creates will be washed away by the use of basic strength training. Heavy resistance is simply dramatically more effective than technique work at growing muscle. Correctives I find that proper muay Thai technique involves a hunched upper back and frequent pushing (punching) movements. These are best balanced with ...


1

The Merck Manual has a table of normal ranges of motion for each joint. (If someone could help me get the table into this answer that would be great--I don't see a simple method.) I haven't gone through every one, but for some movements that I require for lifting, running or sport, I have compared myself to what can be reasonably expected of a functional ...



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