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5

Yes. Nearly all parts of our body will atrophy if we do not use them: muscles, ligaments, neurons. If you train to be able to deadlift 300 pounds then stop lifting, you will very quickly be unable to deadlift 300 pounds. You will eventually be unable to deadlift 250 pounds. A great while later, you might be unable to deadlift 200 pounds. Unless you are ...


3

Juggling is a great cardio exercise anytime but especially when recovering from a lower body injury. It will also improve your coordination which is great since you play sports. Try it sitting in an armless chair. Detailed instructions and photos are in my Juggling for Fitness post on this site's blog. Have fun!


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If you take a look at my answer to a question on the max amount of protein the body can absorb, and use the ballpark number there, you will have sufficient protein to prevent your muscles from being catabolized. I'm assuming the diet is very low carb or ketogenic? Essentially, when your dietary carbohydrate intake is lower than what the brain demands for ...


3

I want to clarify some points for you, which will help you decide what to do: You've been working to add muscle and mass. You've only been working your legs. Muscle responds to Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands (SAID principle) What is unclear is whether you want to keep a more balanced physique with increased mass, or reduce your mass to where it ...


2

If you want to lose muscle mass or fat, no matter where it is, you need to burn more calories than you take in. I would normally say continue exercising, but reduce the amount of carbohydrates and fats you are eating, and eat more lean protein (fish, white meat chicken) and vegetables. However, you mentioned that you're recovering from weight loss, so may ...


2

The first 2 so called 'facts' you've listed I think you may find that with a little more research are not actually FACT. I really don't believe it matters when you eat. If 30 minutes before you go to bed is when you eat your last meal, then that's exactly when you eat. The whole 'no carbs before bed' thing is a bit of a myth based on everything I've read. ...


1

Your muscles and brain run on glycogen. More importantly for this question, Glycogen fuels your muscles. When you exercise with high intensity for 20 minutes or more this is when your body switches from a primarily carbohydrate based metabolism to a fat metabolism, as duration increases so does amount of fat burned for fuel. SO IN ADDITION I suppose ...


1

I used to workout a lot about 10 years ago then due to life ended up no longer working out. I started going back to the gym regularly about 1.5 years ago and I gained the muscle back very quickly. So quickly in fact that it took me a while to get used to the extra growth when going to bed at night. And I'm now adding new muscle. I haven't researched it ...


1

Chinups/pullups, dips (although that might seem quite boring to someone on crutches, pushups (resting your injured foot over the achilles tendon of your good foot), situps, jackknifes, seated overhead press (that might require the help of someone else to get the weights over to you), bench press, seated shrugs, a lot of grip strength exercises should work ...



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