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6

Your training really depends on your goals. There are several factors that program writers have to consider: Training effect: will this help you achieve goal X? In this case increase in muscle mass. Recovery: how quickly can someone train again if they do this routine once. Or what can they do while the body is recovering from some earlier work. As ...


5

According to Nate Winkler, yes. There are things you consume that can impair or improve your ability to perform in the gym or on the field. A short list is as follows: Caffeine abuse. A dose of caffeine before training can be an effective way of being able to do more. However, if you consume so much caffeine that you are no longer sensitive to it, all ...


5

Consider this more as a longer comment but as an answer: Physical analysis Let my try to analyze the differences between weights and resistance bands from a "physical" point of view in two steps: free weights vs Cables and Cables vs Resistance bands: Free weights vs Cables The main difference in force production is that gravitation always points down to ...


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Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


4

I haven't been able to find any research specifically targeting a squat routine versus a different muscle group routine either, so some of this will be inference. I'd theorize that squats are designated as prime exercises simply because they are some of the largest, strongest muscles in the body, so they will have the largest overall response. This is in ...


3

If it is more muscle you are looking for then bodyweight exercises are probably not the best idea. You will gain size, but only to a point. If you want results then going to the gym is your best option. A combination of overhead pressing and bench pressing will give you the upper chest development that you seek. I would suggest a barbell based strength ...


3

How most anaerobic work outs work, as I understand them, is that they cause minor tears to the muscle this causes the process of healing to occur and strengthens the muscle adding mass to and strength to it in the process. The soreness comes from that, your body healing the small tears, so if you are getting sore less often when you are working out more ...


3

Gaining healthy weight is the same for vegetarians as it is for omnivores: lift heavy, eat big, prioritize getting bigger. The only difference is that vegetarians and vegans make it harder for themselves by not eating (or eating less of) some of the most useful foods: meat, dairy, eggs. These foods are great because high-quality versions of them contain good ...


2

Muscle gainers, protein shakes and the like are supplements. They are meant to supplement your diet if it is lacking in certain essential requirements. If you have investigated what your daily calorie and macro-nutrient requirements are, and you find yoruself falling short of what is neccessary to meet your goals, they yes continue to take them. However, ...


2

One rest day between workouts is generally fine. Not taking rest days for up to five or six days in a row can work too, if you're careful. Two rest days between workouts is less common and may be less effective but but can work. Soreness is not a good indicator of whether you should work out again.


2

Jordan, Ab hypertrophy is going to occur like any other muscle -- train them, eat a calorie surplus and rest. All of the exercises that you listed are good. I would mix up rep schemes though -- go really heavy on weighted crunches for 3x8-10. I'm new around here and not really familiar with the culture or any users, but I am assuming all of this ab work ...


2

It's times like this that your body is fatigued. More than likely it's a cumulative affect from the training you've done up till this point, poor nutrition choices, and possibly some life stresses in there. This is normal. Essentially your body needs some relative rest. Take a week and do deload work: half the volume, or half the volume and half the ...


2

While I do agree with the trainer that your plan is very convoluted, I do not agree with her idea of a better plan. Also, what Kneel-Before-ZOD said is quite right, but I feel like I could add something worthwhile. Now brace yourself, this got much lengthier than I first intended. First off, what you're doing is volume training. 32 sets per workout is ...


2

Arrg, To gain muscle mass, you need to consume lots of protein, either through meals or through meals and shakes (my recommendation). I'm not certain what exercises you're doing, but hopefully, they are weightlifting. You won't bulk up with cardio exercises. The most popular programs that focus on gaining strength (and mass) through weightlifting ...


2

First of all, get rid of the idea of putting on 10kg in 6 months without gaining fat. A six-pack-neurosis is not your friend when you're trying to build muscle. No biggie though, fat is easily cut once you've got the muscle base to work it off. Second, your stats are very atypical for an intermediate lifter (see my comment above). If you don't hit the ...


2

There's so many correct answers to your question. You can get closer to that guy's physique, but understand that it's going to look a bit different on your body. There are two major components to building a great physique, and you can't skip either one: nutrition and training. Nutrition is composed of total calories, macro nutrients and micro nutrients ...


2

You can, but its not optimal. Low carb is OK for fat loss, sub-optimal for muscle gain. Personally I carb cycle so training days are relatively high carb - 150g or so. Non-training days are low carb, 50g of carbs. Here are a few links to help: Why it is bad: http://www.examiner.com/article/low-carb-diets-make-it-hard-to-build-muscle Some links that ...


2

I would suggest that 2 seconds up, 2 seconds down is good technique, and should be followed in most exercises. If you need momentum to complete the set or to do the exercise then the weight should be reduced, as this is not good form. In regards to whether it's for muscle gain or endurance, good form should be for both. To look at muscle ...


2

To gain weight generally requires you to gain both fat and muscle. The body generally doesn't partition all calories to the muscle (unless you are in your teens with a very lucky hormonal profile or you are taking steroids). The general rule is 1 lb of fat for 1 lb of muscle (1:1 partitioning), also you will probably gain a lb of water and glycogen. If ...


1

The routine you posted, as well as the one in the link you provided in the comments, take some ideas of High Intensity Training (HIT) to make single sets work. The general idea behind HIT is going as hard as you can, often using intensity techniques. Once the set is done, you gave it your all and there's nothing more to do, so you move on to the next ...


1

If you trainer gave you these supplements, that gives you reason to be skeptical (even suspicious) about his knowledge of the body, its mechanisms, and diet & nutrition. Let's go over a couple of his recommendations: Vitamin C 3000mg per day - Recommended daily intake of vitamin C is about 90mg for an adult male but many athletes can require upwards ...


1

You are not losing weight because you your calorie intake is greater than your calorie expenditure. While this isn't directly attributable to your workout shake, they still have calories - albeit nearly 100% protein. If you which to lose weight but arent, you need to adjust it so you use more calories than you consume. This can either be done by additional ...


1

There are many different variations out there. It depends on your goals, how your body works, what kind of training program you're doing. For example, some people can go straight to their repitition weight whereas people like me, need to warm-up to it. This is where the variation of the weights come into play. Since I am unsure of your goal, I'll take my ...


1

As a former competitive bodybuilder, I can tell you that there is no one recipe for gaining mass. My "pros" and "cons" for a routine would not be the same for you. That's because everyone is an individual. It's all about forcing your muscles to overcome their desire to adapt to workload. One sure way to help that is to change up your training routine as ...


1

Strength and conditioning coach Kelly Baggett espouses a bodybuilding-style approach for short-term gains: If you really wanna gain 10 quick pounds, high volume and high frequency training will certainly do it. You probably won't make any strength gains but for short term optimization in hypertrophy you might try something like the old 3 on 1 off routine ...


1

The acute effect of exercising (any type of exercise) is that the muscles become engorced with blood. This serves to increase oxygenation, remove metabolites, deliver nutrients and anabolic hormones. A muscle that is engorged is, obviously, larger and tighter than one that is not. This is the reason behind your "toned" muscles". Another thing that happens ...


1

It certainly does not completely prevent it. One of my roommates had Marfan's and, while lean, he had enough strength to be able to hurl a 200-lb male across the room (he also had a bit of a temper on him). He did not have a workout regimen, but had grown up on a farm, so he probably grew up with a fair amount of physical activity. I suspect that someone ...


1

I don't think this question is answerable in the scientific literature. It is fundamentally vague, and once made specific the number of relevant variables is too great to form a simple answer at this time. What is our goal? What are we trying to measure? "Mass" is a useful term in casual workout-programming discussions, but are we looking to produce muscle ...


1

Some things to think about, assuming you "gainer" product is one of the many whey protein (+ creatine?) powder: The manufacturer will always tell you to take too much of it (and sell more of it that way) Supplement taking does not gain muscle, hard work in the gym does Extra protein intake can help maximize result of the hard work, and help with recovery, ...


1

Heavy compound exercises, e.g. squats, deadlifts, pullups.., are always good for building mass. Depending on your progression it makes sense that you do a full body workout (squat/lift, pushing and pull on every training day) or a split (1 day push, 1 day legs, 1 day pull). Optionally you can add isolation exercises in order to remove imbalances. And ...



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