Hot answers tagged

10

Physically, and as long as you don't starve during your break, the negative effects will be negligible. Mentally, I can't tell you the amount of people I know who took a short break after just a little while going to the gym and never came back.


5

High level Olympic weight lifters suffer a ~10% loss in strength after a month of not training. Anecdotally, I'll take a week off every couple of months (by choice or chance), and if anything I get a bit more flexible and can get back into the weight room with less nagging inflammation. On the one week side, and definitely if you're out near two weeks or ...


5

The first routine is low on overall weekly volume in terms of sessions in the gym and I would recommend if you chose this route to achieve hypertrophy what you understand that as you develop into a intermediate/advanced lifter that the time you spend in the gym during these 3 session will increase to a significant amount. Whole-body programs are designed to ...


3

What you've read is false. You may not end up with a bodybuilder's body, but push ups is a fundamental exercise everybody does, whether going to a gym or not. It definitely helps you gain muscle mass as long as you keep challenging yourself and altering your workout to target different areas of your chest as well as to prevent your body from adapting to the ...


3

Psychological issues aside (as requested), there is the big, BIG issue of physiological restitution. You've probably heard of the muscle group rest period of 48-hours since both your layouts seem to follow it. But your central nervous system (CNS) is going to be taking a hit 6 days in a row if you follow the second routine. While your muscles may be ...


3

No, protein supplements are made of whey protein, which is the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained. It's not a synthetic product of any kind. I haven't tried the Gold brand in particular, but I can see that it's being sold by some of the most reputable sites (including here in Norway), so I see no reason doubt its quality. Your father ...


3

"Building muscle" is a very broad term. Will your program allow you to build muscle? Yes. Will you look like a bodybuilder? Probably not. Calisthenics 1-2 times a week, assuming properly executed, has the ability to give you good results. Bouldering - that depends... From what I know (and guess), probably won't build big muscles, but will give you a very ...


3

Regarding fat loss, I'll point you towards some info on how "abs are made in the kitchen" (ie: diet is the biggest factor) and strength training is superior to cardio for fat loss. You're not going to be able to use one of the truly kick ass strength training programs because they are all about barbells, primarily because of the compound nature. What I ...


3

For anyone actually wanting to do that workout None of these answers are correct when applied to the workout linked above. The bodybuilding.com email response is also wrong when applied to this workout, I assume they have given a generic answer on what 5 x 3,2,1 means but it has nothing to do with the workout linked. The workout calls for five sets of 3,2,...


2

Objectively Absolutely! There's nothing wrong with taking a break from training, especially after working so hard. Besides, it's not like you'd listen to us if we tell you not to take a break :).. If you feel you need the rest, take a break. One week break will have little impact on your performance, provided you've been working really hard during your ...


2

Timing isn't as important as you may think. The 'Anabolic Window' has been proven a myth (see here for a study). Instead, calculate your total calories for the day and find out where you are. Estimate your sustainable caloric intake - the amount of calories to neither lose nor gain weight - and add 500 to that. Ask yourself other things like: What else am I ...


2

Despite the technical verbiage above, OP is correct to be questioning why a sprinter should have such pronounced upper body musculature. Not only would you naturally have to perform regular and intense hypertrophic exercise to develop such muscles, not the best use of energy for a sprinter, but the intense regime and diet of an Olympic athlete should really ...


2

Where are you getting this information? Unless you have some sort of muscular dystrophy, you can ALWAYS build muscle. It doesn't matter if you're building it for the first time, or re-building it for the tenth. Why would lost muscle mass be lost forever?


2

The shoulder muscles that contribue to the broad shape are primarily the deltoid muscles. This is the muscle that forms the bulk of the shoulder muscle mass, with three heads (Anterior, medial and posterior) that inserts on the humerus. This muscle is primarily involved with shoulder abduction, or moving the upper arm out away from the body. So for swimming,...


2

DEXA stands for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Apparently it is often abbreviated as "DXA" these days, for reasons I'm not sure about. The technique consists of taking an X-ray image of the body at two different energy levels of radiation. When taking an X-ray image of someone's body, some portion of the rays is going to be absorbed by the body, while ...


2

Yes, but not as much as you'd get from standard weightlifting. How much all depends on how much muscle you have currently, and what your genetics (e.g. testosterone levels) are. If you DO pursue bouldering, be sure to spend some time doing 'pushing' exercises (push-ups, overhead-pressing, etc) to keep your shoulders balanced. Otherwise you might be at ...


1

Is 6 days better? Yes. You can bring more energy to each workout and get the same work done to higher quality which leads to better progress. Also you have more room for variation to keep you progressing. But you need to lay out the routine correctly. There are no black and white answers. Can you give an example of the routines? Ideas for setting it up ...


1

Doing all of these will be good for general conditioning and endurance. But for building strength and mass, not so much. That adaptation requires progress, which can take these forms: Increase the resistance (usually done by increasing weight lifted). Increase reps. Increase sets. Decrease rest times between sets. Increasing reps is not very useful for a ...


1

I have broken down the main strokes into their activated muscle groups. Note, you will have to do a lot (and I mean a lot) of swimming to see a big increase in your shoulders. It would be more efficient to follow a bodybuilding/powerlifting programme. Freestyle and Backstroke Core abdominal and obliques are important in rotating the torso for a longer ...


1

The answer to your question depends on what do you consider as building muscles. If you want to build "spindle-shaped" muscles, that look more natural, then climbing is a good option. However, if you want to build your muscles to look more like body builders, then climbing isn't gonna help you that much. In that case, you should do some heavy lifting. 3000 ...


1

In short, Yes you can. But, as you qualified, you'll still want to do your strength training as it will help you burn the fat much more quickly along with continuing to build and maintain your strength. The exact answer on whether you should do 45 min of cardio depends on your fitness goals. Do you just want burn fat? Do you want to build muscle? Or do you ...


1

First of all, I don't think that soreness is measurable nor a tool to estimate your workout efficiency. That being said, yes - your muscles need to recover before you train them again. The resting time recommendation varies, but most trainers recommend 1-2 days of rest after a workout for the particular muscle groups you worked on. Working out the same group ...


1

I've also heard that there are different cycles in training, bulking cycles and cutting cycles. Is it possible to build muscle mass without going through these cycles? Most definitely. I cringe when I hear relative beginners use the terms “bulk” and “cut”. Especially if they’re not competitive bodybuilders. In my opinion, “bulking” and “cutting” is ...


1

Don't worry, you have the wrong information. The only truth is, you can build back your muscles. Big and extreme changes like those on Christian Bale are not good for health at all. If your body is constantly in shock, after some time it can become "stubborn" in terms of difficult weight gain/weight loss. That's why balance is the best solution for your body....


1

As @Alex L points out in the comments: yes you can, but why not just use your body weight or free weights instead? Instead of doing one-armed lat pulldowns, do pull ups: it's the same motion, but there isn't a machine stabilising the weights for you and you are lifting your entire body weight. If that's too difficult you could also consider a one-armed ...


1

To build muscle mass and to increase strength, lower repetitions(try to shoot for about 2 to 6), are more effective. So yes, do low reps to gain mass. The squat is especially important, and work at least half of the major muscle groups on the body(legs, abdominals, back), but still primarily lower body muscles. I hope this helps and good luck with increasing ...


1

Your leg muscles will adapt to the workload placed on them, so it's not really possible to definitively say whether or not your legs will get bigger. If the effort you are putting out is more than you did squatting, then yes, your legs will grow. If it is the same, then your legs will stay about the same size, and if the bike effort is less, they will ...


1

The current theory states that there's two types of muscle mass, sarcoplasmic, and myofibrallar. Sarcoplasmic is mostly fluid, nigh useless. You can elicit sarcoplasmic adaptation through high reps, low intensity. Think body building. Myofibrillar is actual functional mass, i.e. a farmer who bales hay all day every day. So, in the end, make sure the ...


1

There are two main ways to decrease the size of a muscle; Don't use the muscle Or at least use it only when necessary. If you don't use the muscle, it won't be hypertrophied. From there, it could remain at its current size, or decrease in size (atrophy). Overuse the muscle (not recommended) Basically, if you use the muscle a lot, but don't provide it ...


1

In my opinion the best exercise to really get big hams is the stiff leg deadlift with the barbell or even with dumbbells as @Buddy said in his answer keep the reps between 8-12



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