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10

There's no easy answer. It depends on a few variables: The stress you've exposed your muscles to. How close you are to your genetic potential. How good your recovery is. You (probably, based on your fitness as explained) could do 20 pushups a day, every day, and have no problems. However if you tried to push your 1RM (single maximum effort) bench press, ...


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


7

Physically, and as long as you don't starve during your break, the negative effects will be negligible. Mentally, I can't tell you the amount of people I know who took a short break after just a little while going to the gym and never came back.


6

I really didn't get serious about strength training until thirty, and if you look around you'll see people setting records and being incredibly fit in their 40's (and beyond). A good friend of mine is a spokes-model for a supplement company, and his <5% bodyfat shirtless image is on posters in a lot of supplement chain stores. He's 46 this year. In ...


5

I would strongly consider dramatically increasing your intake of grass-fed meat. The fat can be good for you. A large grass-fed steak with a side of veggies drenched in butter from grass-fed cows is tremendously delicious, allows for great variety by changing up the choice of veggies, and is powerfully anabolic when eaten in sufficient quantities. Pastured ...


4

Coming up with a single function for muscle tissue repair with respect to time is literally impossible. Each individual is far too different for any one function to represent us all. It's the whole "one size does NOT fit all" problem that holds for pretty much any physiological issue. That said, there is a study that suggests that ingesting protein just ...


4

Muscle does not build faster than fat burns. It sounds like your main issue is not that you are not burning fat or gaining muscle, but instead you're not actually measuring those things. Your body is not entirely muscle OR fat. In turn, when you weigh yourself you are not only measuring those two factors. You're measuring fat mass and lean body mass ...


4

It's an inverse pyramid strength-training workout. Although this seems to be fairly low reps, it's used to encourage muscles to build volume. I wouldn't suggest hitting these kinds of reps though. Injuries are rampant when you load up on these weights. A more appropriate strength and volume building routine would be 10-8-6 or even 8-6-4 reps, each with ...


4

High level Olympic weight lifters suffer a ~10% loss in strength after a month of not training. Anecdotally, I'll take a week off every couple of months (by choice or chance), and if anything I get a bit more flexible and can get back into the weight room with less nagging inflammation. On the one week side, and definitely if you're out near two weeks or ...


3

After emailing bodybuilding.com, this was their answer: When you are conducting 5 sets of 3,2,1 you will do a rep range of 3, add weigh do a rep range of 2, add weight and then do a rep range of 1. The low reps and high weight will help with muscle building. You should be very fatigued by the time you hit one rep.


3

Strength programs like 3x5, 5x5, or other low-to-mid-rep heavy lifting programs are well suited to maintaining the same weight while doing body recomposition. Just don't eat a tremendous amount. The other option, which I like quite a bit, is to eat as much as possible of high-quality foods (meat, veggies, fish, eggs, dairy) while maintaining a high ...


3

Neither of these supplements are habit forming so no, your body will not "crave" them after you stop using them. However, the effects of both will subside when you stop taking them. If you need to supplement a weight gainer to pack on mass, you will likely need to continue to keep your caloric intake at a certain level to continue to sustain your bulk. ...


3

Yes, deadlifting once a week is better than not deadlifting once a week. It won't, however, work very well at making your arms or legs bigger. Maybe look into making a makeshift dip station at home for some quick tricep workouts that don't interfere with studying.


3

70 days of inactivity will have a muscle atrophy effect. There are measures to limit the extent to which muscle wanes, but still, without use, they will deteriorate. I don't know what NASA is planning to do to counter these effects, but researchers have found that neuromuscular electrical stimulation can keep muscle protein synthesis active in comatose ...


3

Regarding fat loss, I'll point you towards some info on how "abs are made in the kitchen" (ie: diet is the biggest factor) and strength training is superior to cardio for fat loss. You're not going to be able to use one of the truly kick ass strength training programs because they are all about barbells, primarily because of the compound nature. What I ...


2

As protein's a major requirement for bodybuilding vegetarians and vegans will naturally place a limit on the variety of nutrients available to them. I get my protein from multiple sources, meat, fish, dairy, supplements etc. That said it's not impossible to gain mass, you just need to seek out the right foods, but I would expect it would likely take longer ...


2

The resistance generated from bands is very similar to using machines in the gym and I know several people that have built impressive gains on machines only. Just take a look at Hulk Hogan who has built a lot of size using machines exclusively because of all his back injuries. The point is resistance is resistance whether it's bodyweight, free weights or ...


2

It's never too late to improve your health and fitness. You may not be able to get the exact physique you want due to reduced testosterone, but, that doesn't mean you can't improve on what you already have. As we age we don't produce the same amount of hormones as we did early in life. All that means is that fitness gains may be harder to achieve. It does ...


2

A lot depends on what you mean by "training" for your half marathon. Are you just trying to finish it, are you looking to get under 1:30, are you trying to qualify for a higher level race? Those are big differences in training intensity. The best I've found is going into running mode with a decent amount of mass, and then making sure you're lifting heavy ...


2

There's a study floating around that shows muscle increases simply from taking anabolic steroids, with no additional workload. So one would imagine that if you did something to yourself that increased your testosterone and human growth hormone, and had enough protein, you'd get (minute but) similar results. I don't know if there's any research specifically ...


2

Stretching doesn't build muscle. But it does have an important effect on your muscles that makes it useful both post workout and after any period of being still (sitting, sleeping, etc.). The muscle spindles are accustomed being at a "resting length". Say, if you sit in a chair for hours on end, your hamstrings become accustomed to being shortened. The ...


2

I just wanna add something (i might be wrong, a doctor confirmation would be appreciated) but 98% of mass gainers use high in sugar and high IG carbs as a calorie source. Aka maltodextrine or fructose etc. A high dose of sugar (not carbs, >sugar<) in the very long term can give you diabetes. So if you're like me and need a shitload of calories to pack on ...


2

I find the ACSM Position Stand is a very credible source of precisely what you want to know. Evidence category A is backed by significant Random Control Trials (RCT) with significant participants Evidence category B is based on limited RCT studies, or a subgroup analysis, or is a meta-analysis. Evidence category C is Non-randomized trials or ...


2

Unfortunately, you can't change the shape of your muscles (you're not going to be able to morph your peak to width ratio), but you can work on the illusion. If you're not already, consider adding reverse curls and hammer curls to your training program. Both of these lifts train the brachialis and the brachioradialis (as well as the biceps brachii). ...


2

Objectively Absolutely! There's nothing wrong with taking a break from training, especially after working so hard. Besides, it's not like you'd listen to us if we tell you not to take a break :).. If you feel you need the rest, take a break. One week break will have little impact on your performance, provided you've been working really hard during your ...


1

I personally love big calves, screw pants and wear shorts and show them off. But if you really want to lose them, then i'll try to help. Following these steps will not only burn some of your leg muscles tho, but from everywhere, so you may need to counter it by working upper body more. Basically what you need to do is lower your caloric intake, so your ...


1

Any exercise program is going to require calories to support building strength and muscle. While you make no reference to the exercises, sets, and reps you are performing, let’s assume that you are fueling your body sufficiently for the three training days. You can check that by using one of the many online calorie estimators. While they can approximate ...


1

I have managed to find a study (http://jap.physiology.org/content/89/1/81) where they measured the skeletal muscle mass of lower and upper body. Their sample was "large and heterogeneous" (468 people) so it's probably safe to say this table represents the average numbers (in the "All women" and "All men" rows): *SM stands for skeletal muscle. However, I ...


1

Bodybuilders tend to interleave periods of 'ripping' with periods of 'bulking'. If you want to gain muscle fast, you will need to eat big time and will have to accept also 'gaining' a bit of fat and you will need to do mostly anaerobic exercises and skip cardio. If you want to loose fat quickly, you will have to undereat a bit and work out with lower weights ...


1

I agree with Eric. The biggest mistake you can make is to remove or lower your weights. Keep the intensity up and if necessary, lower the volume by a set or two. I would try and get three sessions in a week, but keep them short. No more than half an hour. Stick with compound movements.



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