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9

There's no easy answer. It depends on a few variables: The stress you've exposed your muscles to. How close you are to your genetic potential. How good your recovery is. You (probably, based on your fitness as explained) could do 20 pushups a day, every day, and have no problems. However if you tried to push your 1RM (single maximum effort) bench press, ...


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


6

I really didn't get serious about strength training until thirty, and if you look around you'll see people setting records and being incredibly fit in their 40's (and beyond). A good friend of mine is a spokes-model for a supplement company, and his <5% bodyfat shirtless image is on posters in a lot of supplement chain stores. He's 46 this year. In ...


6

Your training really depends on your goals. There are several factors that program writers have to consider: Training effect: will this help you achieve goal X? In this case increase in muscle mass. Recovery: how quickly can someone train again if they do this routine once. Or what can they do while the body is recovering from some earlier work. As ...


3

If it is more muscle you are looking for then bodyweight exercises are probably not the best idea. You will gain size, but only to a point. If you want results then going to the gym is your best option. A combination of overhead pressing and bench pressing will give you the upper chest development that you seek. I would suggest a barbell based strength ...


2

There's so many correct answers to your question. You can get closer to that guy's physique, but understand that it's going to look a bit different on your body. There are two major components to building a great physique, and you can't skip either one: nutrition and training. Nutrition is composed of total calories, macro nutrients and micro nutrients ...


2

You can, but its not optimal. Low carb is OK for fat loss, sub-optimal for muscle gain. Personally I carb cycle so training days are relatively high carb - 150g or so. Non-training days are low carb, 50g of carbs. Here are a few links to help: Why it is bad: http://www.examiner.com/article/low-carb-diets-make-it-hard-to-build-muscle Some links that ...


2

While I do agree with the trainer that your plan is very convoluted, I do not agree with her idea of a better plan. Also, what Kneel-Before-ZOD said is quite right, but I feel like I could add something worthwhile. Now brace yourself, this got much lengthier than I first intended. First off, what you're doing is volume training. 32 sets per workout is ...


2

Arrg, To gain muscle mass, you need to consume lots of protein, either through meals or through meals and shakes (my recommendation). I'm not certain what exercises you're doing, but hopefully, they are weightlifting. You won't bulk up with cardio exercises. The most popular programs that focus on gaining strength (and mass) through weightlifting ...


2

First of all, get rid of the idea of putting on 10kg in 6 months without gaining fat. A six-pack-neurosis is not your friend when you're trying to build muscle. No biggie though, fat is easily cut once you've got the muscle base to work it off. Second, your stats are very atypical for an intermediate lifter (see my comment above). If you don't hit the ...


2

I would suggest that 2 seconds up, 2 seconds down is good technique, and should be followed in most exercises. If you need momentum to complete the set or to do the exercise then the weight should be reduced, as this is not good form. In regards to whether it's for muscle gain or endurance, good form should be for both. To look at muscle ...


2

To gain weight generally requires you to gain both fat and muscle. The body generally doesn't partition all calories to the muscle (unless you are in your teens with a very lucky hormonal profile or you are taking steroids). The general rule is 1 lb of fat for 1 lb of muscle (1:1 partitioning), also you will probably gain a lb of water and glycogen. If ...


2

Stretching doesn't build muscle. But it does have an important effect on your muscles that makes it useful both post workout and after any period of being still (sitting, sleeping, etc.). The muscle spindles are accustomed being at a "resting length". Say, if you sit in a chair for hours on end, your hamstrings become accustomed to being shortened. The ...


2

It's never too late to improve your health and fitness. You may not be able to get the exact physique you want due to reduced testosterone, but, that doesn't mean you can't improve on what you already have. As we age we don't produce the same amount of hormones as we did early in life. All that means is that fitness gains may be harder to achieve. It does ...


1

Increasing 5-7kg in 2 months is something you can do while staying pretty lean. To increase primarily upper body mass and still maintain your vertical jump is also pretty easy. Diet Your diet needs to change so that you are increasing your mass by no more than .75 kg a week. That will keep you pretty lean, so it won't adversely affect the vertical too ...


1

Considering that one of the biggest improvements you can make for improving your vertical jump is to get strong (PDF), I'd say there's no problem with gaining upper body muscle mass at the same time as you improve lower body strength. Get started squatting, deadlifting, chin-upping, and dipping.


1

Strength Endurance Continuum The strength endurance continuum shows that strength and endurance are at opposing ends of a spectrum. Focusing on one end of the spectrum (for example strength) sacrifices the other (endurance). People tend to view this scale as being a trade-off between strength and size, but as you'll see in a bit, this isn't entirely ...


1

A research paper entitled Resistance exercise load does not determine training-mediated hypertrophic gains in young men written in 2012 showed that a weight as low as 30% of 1RM can contribute to muscle growth, as long as you work to failure, which is around +30 reps and for >2 sets: There was no correlation between phosphorylation of any signaling ...


1

If you trainer gave you these supplements, that gives you reason to be skeptical (even suspicious) about his knowledge of the body, its mechanisms, and diet & nutrition. Let's go over a couple of his recommendations: Vitamin C 3000mg per day - Recommended daily intake of vitamin C is about 90mg for an adult male but many athletes can require upwards ...


1

You are not losing weight because you your calorie intake is greater than your calorie expenditure. While this isn't directly attributable to your workout shake, they still have calories - albeit nearly 100% protein. If you which to lose weight but arent, you need to adjust it so you use more calories than you consume. This can either be done by additional ...


1

The routine you posted, as well as the one in the link you provided in the comments, take some ideas of High Intensity Training (HIT) to make single sets work. The general idea behind HIT is going as hard as you can, often using intensity techniques. Once the set is done, you gave it your all and there's nothing more to do, so you move on to the next ...


1

There are many different variations out there. It depends on your goals, how your body works, what kind of training program you're doing. For example, some people can go straight to their repitition weight whereas people like me, need to warm-up to it. This is where the variation of the weights come into play. Since I am unsure of your goal, I'll take my ...


1

As a former competitive bodybuilder, I can tell you that there is no one recipe for gaining mass. My "pros" and "cons" for a routine would not be the same for you. That's because everyone is an individual. It's all about forcing your muscles to overcome their desire to adapt to workload. One sure way to help that is to change up your training routine as ...


1

The acute effect of exercising (any type of exercise) is that the muscles become engorced with blood. This serves to increase oxygenation, remove metabolites, deliver nutrients and anabolic hormones. A muscle that is engorged is, obviously, larger and tighter than one that is not. This is the reason behind your "toned" muscles". Another thing that happens ...


1

It certainly does not completely prevent it. One of my roommates had Marfan's and, while lean, he had enough strength to be able to hurl a 200-lb male across the room (he also had a bit of a temper on him). He did not have a workout regimen, but had grown up on a farm, so he probably grew up with a fair amount of physical activity. I suspect that someone ...


1

Strength and conditioning coach Kelly Baggett espouses a bodybuilding-style approach for short-term gains: If you really wanna gain 10 quick pounds, high volume and high frequency training will certainly do it. You probably won't make any strength gains but for short term optimization in hypertrophy you might try something like the old 3 on 1 off routine ...


1

I've seen lots of answers for questions like these that say, "good for warmups or small muscles, but not good for gaining mass in larger muscles." Ha ha, dude, get some real weights. It sounds to me like these answers assume that you're using one skimpy band, like the kind they use for physical therapy. Yes, for those single bands, the resistance is ...



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