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Increasing 5-7kg in 2 months is something you can do while staying pretty lean. To increase primarily upper body mass and still maintain your vertical jump is also pretty easy. Diet Your diet needs to change so that you are increasing your mass by no more than .75 kg a week. That will keep you pretty lean, so it won't adversely affect the vertical too ...


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As long as your upper body weight is clean(no fat) you don't have to worry to much ! unless you gain some 10kg only on your upper body. :) As for training in 2 months you wont be able to gain 5-6 kg of clean muscle and maintain your vertical leap. The best type of training you can do is HIT type (maybe 8 times a week- depending on your level); short and ...


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Considering that one of the biggest improvements you can make for improving your vertical jump is to get strong (PDF), I'd say there's no problem with gaining upper body muscle mass at the same time as you improve lower body strength. Get started squatting, deadlifting, chin-upping, and dipping.


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Don't put to much work into getting your arms big ! The arms serve to give you momentum and create the required balance once you get into the jumping position. You have to understand one aspect of the strength training for track & field or speed sports in general. If you are center, yes you will need to get some weight on those arms, if you are a ...


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Muscle mass on your arms will help you create momentum when you throw them up. Also don't neglect core strength. You can impart lots of force with your legs, but go nowhere if your back isn't strong enough to transfer it to your arms, chest, shoulders and arms.


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Be aware you do not need to fully recover from one training to benefit from additional training, especially if it is different in nature. Dual factor training takes this into for advanced lifters (example http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Programming#What_is_dual_factor_periodization.3F_I_don.27t_understand_this_stuff. ) You may not need to worry about ...


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First of all we should know what you workout looks like. The muscle recovery time depends on your genetics, your experience and your training program. Of course, a beginner will take some more time to recover from a workout. Also, If you are able to recover from a workout in 12 hours, for sure you haven't trained with the correct intensity. This doesn't mean ...


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aerobic exercise should be considered a viable option for combating the decline of aerobic capacity and loss of muscle mass that occurs with the normal aging process. Until then, you and I will have to stick with good old weight training.


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I really didn't get serious about strength training until thirty, and if you look around you'll see people setting records and being incredibly fit in their 40's (and beyond). A good friend of mine is a spokes-model for a supplement company, and his <5% bodyfat shirtless image is on posters in a lot of supplement chain stores. He's 46 this year. In ...


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It's never too late to improve your health and fitness. You may not be able to get the exact physique you want due to reduced testosterone, but, that doesn't mean you can't improve on what you already have. As we age we don't produce the same amount of hormones as we did early in life. All that means is that fitness gains may be harder to achieve. It does ...



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