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24

You will find a lot of advice on the Internet about this one, most of it is not demonstrated. This is what the British Journal of Sports Medicine says about it: Recent research suggests that the timing of the intake of protein related to exercise may be more important than the total amount of protein consumed in a day. In the case of resistance ...


12

There's some contradiction as to what's the most important part: timing, quantity etc. I have found pretty good studies that indicate that the post-workout shake doesn't really make a difference and then there are studies like the one Duopixel quotes that suggest the opposite. There are also many variables even regarding the post-workout shake: with/without ...


12

I cannot provide a link to an official analysis of the training/instruction program of an elite military facility. What I can do is tell you of my own personal experience with it. You mentioned the lack of regeneration and rest, and you are absolutely right. The idea behind the selection process is to completely maim you psychologically and put you to the ...


10

Medical Clearance to Exercise A C-section requires that you get medical clearance before you begin postpartum exercises. Assuming that you have clearance (and 4 months post would seem likely that you have) here are some considerations in getting your postpartum belly back in shape: Weight Loss vs Laxity and Weakness There are actually 2 concerns in ...


9

I've spoken to 2 sports nutritionists on this very subject over the past year, and both told me that protein is ineffective in post-recovery workouts, that the muscles can't absorb protein after working out. They said to eat a high-protein breakfast instead. They also said that carbs are all that count for recovery, and that you should eat carbs ...


8

Sorry to disappoint you, but having lots of time is not necessary at all for getting your body in top shape, and it won't contribute to your gains. For better or worse, the program I recommend (based on current scientific research) simply doesn't take very long: Strength training with standard compound exercises, which are bench press, squat, deadlift and ...


8

Always be changing up your routine at least every couple months. Muscles tend to adapt to the training that you give it, so you must do what's called 'muscle confusion' by using different exercises in different ways. This can mean changing from flat bench press to incline bench press, increasing/decreasing rep range or number of sets, or even trying things ...


8

The answer is that yes, you can gain muscle without gaining significant strength. While there is some correlation due to leverage, size is a physiological phenomenon whereas strength is more neurological and depends on the efficiency with which your nervous system coordinates the firing of motor units. The keys to growing muscle regardless of what your ...


8

The Wikipedia article about Running states: A cold bath is a popular treatment of subacute injuries or inflammation, muscular strains, and overall muscular soreness, but its efficacy is controversial.[14] Some claim that for runners in particular, ice baths offer two distinct improvements over traditional techniques. First, immersion allows ...


7

There are both physiological and neurological reasons to build in rest. Even elite athletes who take on volumes of training most of us would not be able to comprehend have smart periods of lighter training and even full rest periods. Physiologically training works by stressing the body just enough that the adaptation allows you to recover and the body ...


7

Immediately after (like within 30 minutes or sooner) dump a bunch of protein into your system. I like chocolate milk, but anything with protein and carbs and fluid is good. This helps your body recover faster as it starts off will all the raw materials it needs. If you can handle it, a cold bath (ice cold is optimum, but very hard to take) can help reduce ...


7

You are correct to be suspicious of the "one muscle a day" prescription. While that method works fine, it is perfectly possible and very productive to do whole-body exercises every time you work out. Many Olympic weightlifters do what's called Bulgarian training, which is training five or more days a week, sometimes several times a day. They use whole-body ...


7

The good news is that there is more than one way to achieve your goals. That means that you can have two answers that vary within a certain degree and they will both be right. In short, there is no "best". The related question that @Informaficker linked to in his comment applies to this conversation. It's also important to understand that many successful ...


7

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


6

A lot of the answer depends on your goals and the exercise you are doing. Our bodies are marvelous creations that can adapt to a wide range of stresses over time. However, there are a few principles you can use to apply to your exercise regimen: Muscle is torn down and exhausted while you exercise Muscle is built back up when you rest--usually ...


6

Think of it as a gentle meat tenderizer. But instead of weakening the muscle by pulverizing it, the added pressure and use simply promotes blood flow to massaged areas. Foam rollers are great recovery tools because they generate similar benefits as a sports massage, but can be performed by one's self.


6

I'm going to answer in a general sense, as the same advice works when you are doing squats, deadlifts, and other exercises. There comes a time where you just can't keep hitting the same exercise and expect to increase the next time you do it. Essentially, you need to vary the weight intensity and volume over time. Weekly Progression Both Texas Method ...


6

There's no easy answer. It depends on a few variables: The stress you've exposed your muscles to. How close you are to your genetic potential. How good your recovery is. You (probably, based on your fitness as explained) could do 20 pushups a day, every day, and have no problems. However if you tried to push your 1RM (single maximum effort) bench press, ...


5

As @Nick mentioned, there are a couple of changes to suggest. Switch up your workout, with a focus on compound lifts. Stick with a tried and true workout if you don't feel comfortable making your own. I suggest Starting Strength or Stronglifts 5x5. I would also suggest lowering your reps to 5. Five seems achieve the maximum effect for training (From the ...


4

If you're doing a full body workout 6 days a week, you absolutely need the rest week. If you are working different muscle sets each day then it's less important. The body does need time to catch up to the new muscle that you are building. The body's internal organs have to gain strength to handle working those muscles, and without the rest, your body can ...


4

There can be a number of things going on from muscle imbalances to alignment problems. The problem is that they can feed off of one another. For example muscle imbalances can pull your spine out of alignment, and the alignment makes it difficult to balance the exercise. Basically when you have one group of muscles significantly stronger than another ...


4

A lot of it has to do with your programming. If you are training for 3-4 hours a day, 5 days a week, you have a great potential to do too much. Here's the deal: Overtraining is accompanied by a loss of performance, and in more serious cases can be accompanied by symptoms that look like clinical depression. MMA fighters and military are not training ...


4

Sounds like a tall order. Before you begin, understand that you are bound for a world of pain as your body reacts to a sudden increase in activity with DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness). If you are pretty much detrained, then you have a short window of time where you can make increases every day. Strength Training Starting Strength, now in it's 3rd ...


4

You can find a lot of great information online - search for "recovery nutrition". There are two areas that are important: First, you need to rehydrate, unless you are one of those rare people who actually drinks enough to stay hydrated on the ride. Second, you need to replace your carbohydrate stores. There is a "golden window" after the end of exercise ...


4

You have made solid progress. Congratulations, keep up the hard work. If I were you I'd switch to a program that adds weight weekly or monthly, such as Rippetoe & Kilgore's Texas Method from Practical Programming, or 5/3/1, or another similar program. That will keep you adding strength for quite a while longer. I'd consider switching up exercises, to ...


3

After strenuous exercise, ice is used to vasoconstrict the blood vessels that are leading to the area that is inflamed. This helps to slow the inflammatory response and will protect the area from further injury/inflammation. Ice only works for the first 24 hours, and it only needs to be used in a 20 minutes on and then 20 minutes off. After that, heat ...


3

As far as I know, the totality of research does not indicate any benefit of pre- or post-exercise stretching to recovery time or injury reduction. That is not to say stretching is totally worthless, because it can enhance mobility and range of motion, just to say that it doesn't matter when you do it in relation to your workout. I am not aware of research ...


3

I have three things that I changed about my diet when I started training in martial arts: Drink more water. I drink a gallon a day. You'd be surprised how much you sweat while working out. Have you ever weighed yourself before and after a heavy leg day for example? Take a fish oil or other omega-3 fatty acid supplement. Once you get into training kicking ...


3

You are probably over-thinking this. Here's what is happening: Your body needs energy to adapt to what you are asking it to do Since you told your body you need it to build muscle, that's what it started doing After a week off you may not lose any strength, but your body was starting to adapt to lower demands on it As you get older, it takes longer for ...


3

Although I cannot fully answer this question with specific scientific evidence, I can provide input that supports the assumptions of the original question. The original author assumes there is a scientific basis for the physical fitness programs used by the elite fighting units of the United States' military. At least one response called this assumption ...



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