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11

There was a 2010 study that touched on this a bit, and suggests there's more going on than muscle memory. Effects of previous strength training can be long-lived, even after prolonged subsequent inactivity, and retraining is facilitated by a previous training episode. Traditionally, such "muscle memory" has been attributed to neural factors in the ...


10

There's no easy answer. It depends on a few variables: The stress you've exposed your muscles to. How close you are to your genetic potential. How good your recovery is. You (probably, based on your fitness as explained) could do 20 pushups a day, every day, and have no problems. However if you tried to push your 1RM (single maximum effort) bench press, ...


10

It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), but you'll note the Delayed word there. The pain usually shows up 24 hours later and is gone around 72 hours. It's actually not fully understood (2003 analysis in Sports Medicine): Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective ...


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


6

Nathan, first, please check out this answer on myofibril vs sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. With muscular endurance, you are dealing with (to simplify things greatly) three variables: Myofibril: how many contracting fibers you have in the muscle (e.g., one elastic band vs a bunch of elastic); how strong you are Sarcoplasm: how much stored energy your muscle ...


5

The problem you are running into is one of context. The answer to the problem depends on what's causing the progress to stall. Neither answer is inherently wrong, nor is either answer more correct. For a better answer to your question, I have to introduce the concept of periodization. At it's simplest definition, periodization is the process of ...


5

Is it better to focus on one group of muscles each day of weightlifting? You will be very well served by doing Starting Strength of Stronglifts 5x5. Ignore everything you've ever been told, and follow either of those two programs for 6-9 months like a religion. Do you think I should do more cardio than 30mins, if I can hold it?(Time is currently ...


5

The soreness that you experience is called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). So by definition it is delayed. What causes it? When you exercise, the muscles get damaged. That damage is a signal for the muscle to grow and get stronger. That signal stimulates inflammation. Any inflammatory process produces local pain. Why is it delayed? It takes a day ...


4

I'm a bodyweight training addict. In my point of view doing 1 x 50 is better than doing 10 x 5 because you have the same volume but in less time, you have more intensity. The first commandments in a post of Paul "Coach" Wade about calisthenics mass is "Embrace Reps" and the 4th is "Limit sets" source : ...


4

The phrase is a marketing slogan. That said, it is based on the principle that if you do the same thing time and time again, your gains will plateau at some point. By varying what you are doing and targeting the muscles in different ways, it will take your body longer to "get used" to a particular routine/exercise, which results in plateauing.


4

I'm super surprised no one has mentioned the major source of muscle imbalance in climbers: climbing is a pulling sport more than a pushing sport. This results in overdevelopment of upper-body pulling muscles (biceps and back) relative to pushing muscles (chest and triceps). I personally have a friend who climbs 5.14 and yet has terrible back pain that ...


4

Six months is really not a long time. You can get to advanced level in 2-3 years (with proper programming) and spend six months just to put on 5-10kg to your lifts after that. By taking six months off, you might miss out on maybe 3-4 pounds of muscle gain. Obviously you don't want to go backwards on your legs, so keep in mind the detraining rates outlined ...


4

Within a few weeks, you'll start noticing increased muscle definition. This will depend upon your body fat: the less fat you have the easier it is to see muscle definition. Your low carb diet will probably throw you into ketosis, and you're probably calorie deficient (although that's a big assumption), so you'll be doing a lot of fat burning. You will ...


4

The Problem with Ab Exercises Most ab workouts/routines you see are mostly if not entirely composed of bodyweight exercises. These are great for beginners, because there is such a sharp learning curve due to the high body weight and lack of muscle. Unfortunately, they have a significant disadvantage. The problem is as your muscle grows stronger and adapts ...


4

It should be noted that it's very hard to make good studies showing wether exercise helps or not. All you can do is to ask old people about their history of exercise and correlate it with their health (or ask their relatives if they are dead.), but this correlation will contain unwanted components. For example; people who exercise often eat different food ...


4

I know that bodybuilding makes you heavier, stronger and more attractive, but is it really beneficial for one's health in the long run? Bodybuilding is not strength training. Bodybuilding is a very specific practice to improve one's looks. Strength training, by contrast, is training to improve the capabilities of one's body. Strength training is the ...


4

First off, rid yourself of the "I could eat anything in any amount" mindset. You couldn't, and here's why; In order to gain weight, it's a simple case of eating more calories than you spend. A lot of people say "oh, I can eat 4 helpings of taco, and I won't gain any weight". Well, for the trained eye, this resolves into "he ate a lot there and then, but ...


4

This is fairly similar to a question I had answered here: Which exercise program is better for fat loss? To start, keep in mind (as another user had answered in the linked question) your diet is your key factor. So regardless of your choice, it is how and what you eat that will determine your results. As someone who is already fit and wants to add muscles, ...


3

While you could blame genetics, biking up enough hills and eating enough food will get you big legs. Nothing to be done about that. So don't do that. If you want less leg muscles, you need to burn them. You want to train longer at a lower intensity. You also want to consume less protein so that your body can't build new muscles and ultimately can't maintain ...


3

I want to clarify some points for you, which will help you decide what to do: You've been working to add muscle and mass. You've only been working your legs. Muscle responds to Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands (SAID principle) What is unclear is whether you want to keep a more balanced physique with increased mass, or reduce your mass to where it ...


3

Honestly, I'd ramp up over a couple weeks. Week 1: half the volume of work Week 2: 3/4 the volume of work Week 3: back to full volume Cardiovascular fitness is easy to lose, but also very easy to reacquire. Strength is slower to lose, but 4-5 weeks won't see any significant differences. However, the bigger concern is the health of your tendons and ...


3

I think we all have genetic predispositions when it comes muscles. I find it very difficult to build up my chest, but have no problem building muscle in other areas. If would continue squatting and performing other lower body exercises, I would cut back on the volume quite a bit and maintain the intensity (weight/tension). Not knowing what your current ...


3

For the sake of vocabulary, I think you're talking about "training recovery". There is short term recovery, like the time you need between sets, but you mentioned supercompensation so you're talking about something more like: I just did a bunch of compound barbell lifts, how long until my body will be stronger because of the exercise? You can get ...


3

The advice contained on a number of health sites (eg NHS UK or Harvard Medical School) positively recommend progressive "resistance" training twice every week (in addition to cardio-vascular training) - because of the health benefits it brings. Not only are you conditioning your muscles, but also combating loss of bone density as well as strengthening and ...


3

I have not tried out 5x5 training myself but it consists of two full body-workouts: Workout A: Squat, Bench Press, Barbell Row Workout B: Squat, Overhead Press, Deadlift, You train three times a week, alternating workout A and B, and resting at least one day between two workouts. You never train two days in a row because your body needs days ...


3

70 days of inactivity will have a muscle atrophy effect. There are measures to limit the extent to which muscle wanes, but still, without use, they will deteriorate. I don't know what NASA is planning to do to counter these effects, but researchers have found that neuromuscular electrical stimulation can keep muscle protein synthesis active in comatose ...


3

Short answer: Don't worry about it. This is a detail. Long answer: Restitution is very important, but as long as you don't go back to the gym and start doing another upper body workout immediately, you're still resting. You can, for instance, compensate by eating a bit more, and providing more nutrition to the muscles. So long as this is something that ...


2

The more repetitions you can do, the more you are moving towards endurance training. That is to say, you will develop muscles that can perform the same motion over and over without tiring as easily. Heavier weight with fewer repetitions is more for building muscle mass. That being said, just performing 10 sets of push-ups for 5 repetitions will not build ...


2

In the wide group of people I climb with, the opposite is true. I'd have to agree with Liam - these days, climbing training is incredibly well balanced, with most folks combining a high degree of cardio workout with core strength, and isometrics, along with weights for extension and flexion. Hunches seem to have been an issue earlier than ten years ago, ...


2

Lowering a weight slowly then explosively curling it is doing a "slow negative". For fast punches and kicks you should be working on your basic barbell lifts: squat, deadlift, power clean, overhead press, push press. These are the best method for developing a high power output. Add in some fighter-oriented bodyweight and dumbbell work from Ross Enamait and ...



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