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5

The problem you are running into is one of context. The answer to the problem depends on what's causing the progress to stall. Neither answer is inherently wrong, nor is either answer more correct. For a better answer to your question, I have to introduce the concept of periodization. At it's simplest definition, periodization is the process of ...


2

I'm super surprised no one has mentioned the major source of muscle imbalance in climbers: climbing is a pulling sport more than a pushing sport. This results in overdevelopment of upper-body pulling muscles (biceps and back) relative to pushing muscles (chest and triceps). I personally have a friend who climbs 5.14 and yet has terrible back pain that ...


1

I've picked up this as it was mentioned on another SE site. I don't think this is true. I do not think that climbers suffer from muscle imbalances, in fact this type of imbalance would be very detrimental to climbing ability. Almost every climber I know has better posture than the average person. Most climbers work hard on posture, it's very important as ...


1

Cellular oedema would reverse rather quickly after exercise. As far as pump goes, there is one simple explanation, and one complicated one. Cellular oedema due to an influx of Na and H2O probably contribute, but not as much. The simple one is that while exercising, there is local hypoxia and hypertension. This causes the vascular resistance to decrease, ...


4

Exercising after eating is safe. The other answers here are based on personal opinions. When you eat, the process of digestion is aided by the parasympathetic nervous system (rest and digest). When you exercise your sympathetic nervous system releases adrenaline, which inhibits the peristaltis in your gut. This in terms makes the food move more slowly ...


2

To gain weight generally requires you to gain both fat and muscle. The body generally doesn't partition all calories to the muscle (unless you are in your teens with a very lucky hormonal profile or you are taking steroids). The general rule is 1 lb of fat for 1 lb of muscle (1:1 partitioning), also you will probably gain a lb of water and glycogen. If ...


0

Gaining mass is a product of a excess food and lifting regularly. Gaining lean muscle is slightly harder. My top tips: Eat regular small meals: 4-6 moderate meals a day, try to stack up on protein (egg, meat, fish), carbs (potatoes (baked preferrably - not deep fried) rice and pasta (opt for wholemeal)) + VEGGIES (yes you need them, the nutrients from ...


0

As a general rule I try to wait 30 mins after a meal before doing any type of lifting (45-60mins before I attempt cardio) If I workout any time less than this I can feel quite sickly. Also depends what you have ate, a light sandwich is no problem, give it 15-20 mins, if your having a hefty meal you probably want close to an hour.


-1

After meal assuming you did not drink much water after finishing meal. You should take 20mins rest. Since our digestion process starts and and doing max 10 (no reps) pull ups / chin ups after rest would be fine, since you said you don't want to go for walk.


0

You probably won't see this addressed in the texts and papers as it is a somewhat rare occurrence that doesn't affect the general sporting population. In this study, they address alveolar hypoxia due to lung injury and/or climbing at high altitudes (Everest type altitudes) that causes pulmonary edema. Both of these would impair the gas exchange at the ...



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