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1

I would stretch them out first and try to increase your flexibility. Maybe you are not recovering from your workouts sufficiently. Not knowing you, it is hard to hypothesize, but those are the only issues I can think of outside of an existing injury.


1

From what you've said I'm assuming the volume in your legs is largely muscle, but also with thighs the size of an olympic cyclists, presumably a somewhat significant level of fat. Achieving this size due purely to muscle is very difficult. (This is however a big assumption, so please correct me if I'm wrong.) The 10lbs gained during training is likely due in ...


0

I am sure the size of your legs is a combination of genetics and hypertrophy from the exercise you have participated in. I agree with the taking in less calories. You will lose weight, but there is no guarantee where the weight will come off. I would working getting leaner overall through exercise and diet, but at the same time learn to accept your legs as ...


1

A lot of it depends on how much volume you are performing and how much you are lifting (intensity). Not knowing that, it is hard to comment. I have performed 10 sets of 10 reps on a squat protocol and it will take me 5 days to recover. Where as I can perform 3 sets of 12 reps on a split squat on a Monday and I am ready to go again 48 hours later on the ...


3

For the sake of vocabulary, I think you're talking about "training recovery". There is short term recovery, like the time you need between sets, but you mentioned supercompensation so you're talking about something more like: I just did a bunch of compound barbell lifts, how long until my body will be stronger because of the exercise? You can get ...


0

Go for maximal strength workouts. Those develop strength rather than mass. And, follow these other nine steps in the link below. Sorry for linking a "men's fitness" page but the principles are very sound nevertheless :) http://www.mensfitness.com/training/build-muscle/10-ways-build-strength-without-size


2

Not being able to you in person, it is hard for me to say what this is doing to your body. I can say that after 2 weeks, the majority of your strength gains can be attributed'neural' adaptations. Meaning that your brain has become more efficient at sending messages to the working muscles. After 6 weeks, a higher percentage of your strength gains will be as a ...


2

I think we all have genetic predispositions when it comes muscles. I find it very difficult to build up my chest, but have no problem building muscle in other areas. If would continue squatting and performing other lower body exercises, I would cut back on the volume quite a bit and maintain the intensity (weight/tension). Not knowing what your current ...


4

Within a few weeks, you'll start noticing increased muscle definition. This will depend upon your body fat: the less fat you have the easier it is to see muscle definition. Your low carb diet will probably throw you into ketosis, and you're probably calorie deficient (although that's a big assumption), so you'll be doing a lot of fat burning. You will ...


0

I think a lot of it comes down to protein intake. If your calories are low and your protein intake is low, then a lot of your weight loss will come from muscle. If you up your protein and maintain the calories where they at, then you have a fighting chance at losing the majority of your calories from adipose tissue (fat).


1

Regarding being thin and wanting to put some strength on, there's a very well written answer over here I'd recommend checking out. I usually skip meals or eat little. I drink a lot of juice (Apple Juice) which I know has a lot of sugar. Juice is pretty terrible to be honest: it's like all the bad parts of fruit with none of the good parts. Your body ...


0

Yes - but only if you wear it all the time. Odds are good that any sort of strength-augmentation suit would be rather uncomfortable to wear for long periods. Think about wearing a back-brace, knee-brace, and elbow-brace all at the same time. Likely you couldn't wait to take it all off.


1

Mephisto already alluded to it, but I'll call it out again. The only way to ensure a weak leg is doing it's job is to exercise each leg independently. Any single leg work that you can do properly will work, but there are several options. Some examples are: Leg press, single leg BW and/or dumbbell lunges Split squats One thing has me concerned ...


1

I suggest you build up strength gradually by doing leg presses but pushing with one leg only (of course, alternate legs, although the strongest one will not benefit much until the weakest one catches up). I mention the Leg Press because it is the closest thing there is to a basic, compound leg exercise like the squat, but with the leg press machine you can ...


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When you are talking about legs, there is only one word that matters: squat. It is the one exercise to rule them all. Start my simply doing body weight (BW) squats. If you cannot do that, then start by doing mobility stretches to address any areas preventing you from doing a proper BW squat. The focus here should be teaching your body the movement, and ...


3

Honestly, I'd ramp up over a couple weeks. Week 1: half the volume of work Week 2: 3/4 the volume of work Week 3: back to full volume Cardiovascular fitness is easy to lose, but also very easy to reacquire. Strength is slower to lose, but 4-5 weeks won't see any significant differences. However, the bigger concern is the health of your tendons and ...



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