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When you are talking about legs, there is only one word that matters: squat. It is the one exercise to rule them all. Start my simply doing body weight (BW) squats. If you cannot do that, then start by doing mobility stretches to address any areas preventing you from doing a proper BW squat. The focus here should be teaching your body the movement, and ...


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Honestly, I'd ramp up over a couple weeks. Week 1: half the volume of work Week 2: 3/4 the volume of work Week 3: back to full volume Cardiovascular fitness is easy to lose, but also very easy to reacquire. Strength is slower to lose, but 4-5 weeks won't see any significant differences. However, the bigger concern is the health of your tendons and ...


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Another answer recommends Abdominal Roll-outs. I'd not recommend you to directly jump to the Abdominal Rollout exerceses shown in that answer. Its an advanced exercise. My recommendation is start with physio ball or Exercise Ball ab exercises and then proceed to Ab roll out workout. Even in ab roll workout start with the most versions and work your way up ...


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Planks are isometric exercises, great for warming up & an important skill to build for future (more advanced) exercises. They challenge your bodies ability to recruit muscles in combination to stabilise your body/form - for efficiency I limit my isometric exercises to 1:30 end goal. I add ~5 second increments each session to gradually progress the load. ...


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I want to clarify some points for you, which will help you decide what to do: You've been working to add muscle and mass. You've only been working your legs. Muscle responds to Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands (SAID principle) What is unclear is whether you want to keep a more balanced physique with increased mass, or reduce your mass to where it ...


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If you want to lose muscle mass or fat, no matter where it is, you need to burn more calories than you take in. I would normally say continue exercising, but reduce the amount of carbohydrates and fats you are eating, and eat more lean protein (fish, white meat chicken) and vegetables. However, you mentioned that you're recovering from weight loss, so may ...


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Six months is really not a long time. You can get to advanced level in 2-3 years (with proper programming) and spend six months just to put on 5-10kg to your lifts after that. By taking six months off, you might miss out on maybe 3-4 pounds of muscle gain. Obviously you don't want to go backwards on your legs, so keep in mind the detraining rates outlined ...


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But I just have two glasses per day, that's healthy, right? For all these conditions [colorectum, liver and breast cancers, essential hypertension and chronic pancreatitis], low intakes, corresponding to daily consumption of two drinks or two glasses of wine (25 g/day), have shown significant risks. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10790907 The ...


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It's OK, but certainly not good for you Since you're not getting plastered-drunk on two cans of beer, you're not impeding muscle-growth much. Beer does have plenty of calories, and they are liquid calories, so your hunger-levels don't notice them as much. I would recommend keeping the beer-drinking to weekends - an everyday habit can add-up in calories. ...


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Be aware you do not need to fully recover from one training to benefit from additional training, especially if it is different in nature. Dual factor training takes this into for advanced lifters (example http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Programming#What_is_dual_factor_periodization.3F_I_don.27t_understand_this_stuff. ) You may not need to worry about ...


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First of all we should know what you workout looks like. The muscle recovery time depends on your genetics, your experience and your training program. Of course, a beginner will take some more time to recover from a workout. Also, If you are able to recover from a workout in 12 hours, for sure you haven't trained with the correct intensity. This doesn't mean ...



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