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I posted this as a comment to Eric's answer which is pretty much on the point but to add a bit more specifically to answer your points. A warm up and some dynamic stretches to begin with. You can static stretch at the end of the work out. From a sports injury perspective a professional sports physio would get you to warm up for 5 minutes then dynamically ...


2

Despite some answers naysaying stretching, it depends on what physicals activities you are going to do and -- what I read -- was consistency. The people who had fewest injuries were those who either regularly stretched before their workout -- OR -- regularly didn't stretch. Those that stretched inconsistently were the most like to achieve the "injured ...


12

First off, ask your trainer how many athletes he or she has trained that have won national, regional, or international titles. Personally, my belief is that unless you have trained someone that's made the Olympic team (or around there), you should probably put your ego in check and emulate what the Olympic trainers are doing. Training isn't an art project ...


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Recent research indicates that stretching might be more of a pre-workout magical ritual than an actually useful functional component. It was taught as the "correct" way for decades and most people never questioned it (then again, so was "a low fat diet makes you skinny"), so you're likely to still run into it with PE teachers and fitness trainers, i.e. ...


5

Static stretching very slightly decreases the chance of injury at a strong detriment to strength. Its not necessarily wrong but if you want to lift heavy may be wrong for you. Cardio before lifting worries me though, as its likely that you will tire out many of your weakest muscles (much of your abdominals for example) before you even start lifting, causing ...


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Within-participant comparisons reveal and inverse logarithmic relationship between ∆muscleCSA and V•O2max. In other words, although we all love adding muscle, it can absolutely be detrimental to some other exercise adaptations, like work rate in activities of middle and long durations.


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Hypertrophy is the sole phenomenon of muscles getting bigger. (This can be considered a distinct physiological process, but is difficult if not impossible to trigger separate from increases in strength, endurance, and so on.) Hypertrophy in and of itself slightly increases strength due to leverage advantages that come with greater cross-sectional area ...


2

You need to reduce your calorie intake so you have a small calorie deficit (around 200kcal/day would be good, 500kcal/day as an absolute maximum) - this will facilitate the weight loss. However at the same time you need to be very disciplined with what you eat, maintaining a high protein intake and continuing to work out is key to maintaining your muscle ...


2

It all depends on your idea of ripped. Yes you can more easily lose weight doing sports but "generally" the answer to your question is no as it is not very easy to put on muscle when practicing sports due to the lack of increase in resistance each time you play. Let's say you are playing soccer (football for Non-US). Sure you may be able to run more each ...



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